While an alarming number of young Black men end up locked up at least once in their lives, Black women suffer the most from being locked out-of their apartments. According to a recent Milwaukee study, one in every 20 renters are evicted each year. But in neighborhoods where most residents are Black, the numbers change significantly: One in every 10 renters is evicted every year, and those evicted are usually Black women and 40%  are Black single mothers. This has been referred to as the “feminine equivalent to incarceration.” While much focus has been paid to foreclosures and its devastating effects in recent years, eviction can have just as crippling an impact to one’s life as well. Not only does eviction go on your credit report and lowers your FICO score, but it will make it harder for you to find another apartment, as most landlords won’t rent to you. Higher rental rates, security deposits and penalty fees are also a factor.

If you see a possible eviction in the future,  here are a few resources that you may be able to tap into for help:

  • Charitable organizations like Catholic Charities
  • The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Local housing authorities which offer options for affordable housing
  • Your landlord may have a list of resources to tap into

  • http://thehappygoluckybachelor.blogspot.com Clnmike

    I think it’s unfair to not include the income and class of the women who are being evicted in comparison to others.

  • Karyn

    @Clnmike, but to do that would actually acknowledge that black people aren’t monolithic and we can’t have that *sarcasm off*

    • http://thehappygoluckybachelor.blogspot.com Clnmike

      Lol, I see your point.

  • dvine

    another tired asss article putting down AA women.. instead posting these bias assss studies kicking ppl back in, why not post uplifting articles and ways that single mothers regardless of race can do to avoid incidents such as these.

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