Brazilian Blowouts have been all the rage in salons nationwide. The intense smoothing treatment promises to improve the health of the hair by coating the cuticle in protein, which eliminates frizz and leaves our tresses luxuriously shiny. On their website, the company boasts several factors that supposedly set them apart from the rest: the products are non-damaging and contain no harsh chemicals, the treatment is quick and can be completed in just 90 minutes, results are immediate and last for up to 12 weeks, and they claim that all products are Formaldehyde-Free.

Well, recent studies done by Oregon’s Occupational Safety & Health Administration have found that last claim to be untrue. After the FDA received complaints of adverse health effects caused during application of the Brazilian Blowout, chemists decided to test the products in the lab. Keep in mind, precautions are supposed to be taken when hair products contain even .1% Formaldehyde. The two samples taken from different salons in Oregon found that the smoothing solution did, in fact, contain about 8-10% of the carcinogen.

These findings are only the beginning, and more tests are being done to confirm the safety of the Brazilian Blowout. But for now, the effects seem to be most harmful for stylists who are at danger of being exposed to the cancer-causing chemicals so frequently throughout the day. There have been complaints of eye irritation, difficulty breathing, headaches, and even nose bleeds. Yet and still, the hair company continues to defend the quality of their products; their argument is that since the samples weren’t taken directly from the manufacturer, the findings cannot be deemed reliable or valid. We’ll keep you posted.

Knowing this new information, would you still try a Brazilian Blowout?

Tags:
Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter
  • NiecyC

    Are they talking about the real Brazilian Blowout or the imitators? The real trademarked Brazilian Blowout does not contain formaldehyde.

  • It’s worth remembering that this investigation was only into a single product, called Brazilian Blowout and that the same name has become a generic term for keratin straightening, especially in the States.
    There are many other products which produce very similar results without the use of Formaldehdye. It’s just unfortunate that it was the leading product in America that fell foul.

    As a rule of thumb, Brazilian straightening products tend to come in two varieties. Thise that can be washed out on the same day and those that have to be left on for between 48 and 72 hours.

    It’s the first group, that offer ‘no downtime’ which tend to contain Formaldehyde or its equally dangerous derivatives.

    If you’re looking for a safe alternative, try a product from Brazil, where regulation is much tougher. For a start, you’ll always find a complete list of ingreidents on the side of the bottle. But it’s also worth noting that Brazil has much tougher legislation to protect consumers, and no products which could potentially harm end users would ever be sanctioned for sale in the first place.

    Have a look around online for names like Escova Progressiva (the generic term we use for keratin straightening in Brazil), or product names like Systema Rising or Zene Progress, which are both excellent products.

    Just because one leading company has decieved the public shouldn’t put people off what is a fantastic product for fighting frizz.

  • It’s worth remembering that the report was only into a single product, called Brazilian Blowout and that the same name has become a generic term for keratin straightening, especially in the States.
    There are many other products which produce the same results without Formaldehdye. It’s just unfortunate that it was such a high profile company that has been cheating.

    I guess it was a money saving option, as Formaldehyde is a good deal cheaper than the alternatives.

    As a rule of thumb, Brazilian straightening products tend to come in two types. Those that can be washed out same day and those that have to be left for upto 72 hours.

    It’s the first group, that offer sameday results which tend to contain Formaldehyde or its equally dangerous derivatives.

    If you’re searching for a safer alternative, try products from Brazil, where regulation is much tougher.
    For a start, you’ll always find a complete list of ingreidents on the side of the bottle. But it’s also worth noting that Brazil has much tougher legislation to protect consumers, and no products which could potentially harm end users would ever be sanctioned for sale in the first place.

    Have a look around online for names like Escova Progressiva (the generic term we use for keratin straightening in Brazil), or product names like Systema Rising or Zene Progress, which are both excellent products.

    Just because one leading company has decieved the public shouldn’t put people off what is a fantastic product for fighting frizz.

  • Mashana

    There is no way i would use this product,if it has those effects to a client just imagine what it will do to a stylist in the long run,I’ll stick with relaxers,thank you…IT’S A HEALTH HAZZARD……

  • Carrie Lisher

    Some say their product only contains “aldehyde.” Aldehyde is not a chemical, but rather, it is a grouping of chemicals with same basic components, a carbonyl center bonded to hydrogen and an R group. Formaldehyde is the simplest aldehyde, which is not bonded to an R group, but instead is bonded to another hydrogen atom. I’m not a chemist or scientist, but it seems that an aldehyde could easily be reduced to formaldehyde, the simplest of the family through a chemical reaction, perhaps involving heat from a flat iron?
    Just the fact that these companies would confuse this term with an actual chemical to allay our fears is reason enough for suspicion.

    The ones who do admit to manufacturing treatments with formaldehyde claim that although their product contains unsafe levels, the levels we are exposed to via fumes released during the process are acceptable by OSHA standards. My question is who is OSHA to say what is acceptable? What is the cumulative affect of being exposed to these fumes? What testing has really been done, and how thorough has it been if there has been any?

    I feel like we as stylists should stand up and and say we won’t be taken advantage of, won’t let our health be compromised, but it seems like we won’t because we’re either too greedy or too ignorant to care about this. I can’t seem to find any concrete information about any of these treatments through websites, nor through emailing them. I’m met with very general answers that gloss over the questions at best.

    I am currently being exposed to the Marcia Teixeira treatment, a known formaldehyde containing product, on a daily basis.