The HBCU Debate: Are They Still Necessary?

by Geneva S. Thomas

Alums of Historically Black Colleges and Universities are filled with alma mater pride. Former students continuously boast about their undergraduate experience long after graduating—how they were culturally enhanced, intellectually challenged—and even keep in touch with former professors. Arguably, no Black college graduate has the school spirit of HBCU alums.

But today it seems HBCUs are under attack.

Last month, President Barack Obama hosted a White House reception in celebration of the contributions of the 105 Black colleges and universities. Obama pledged to invest $850 million in these schools over the next decade. Shortly after, the 21st century HBCU debate fledged into full swing.

The recent anti-HBCU commentary couples a set of frightening statistics behooving us all—HBCUs alums, or not— to take a closer look. Moreover, according to recent studies over the past three years, the collegiate crests mounting the chests of metropolitan Black professionals in cafes and “it” brunch spots, are the real schools left behind.

According to Jason L. Riley, long time writer and editorial board member of the Wall Street Journal, 90 percent of African Americans don’t attend HBCUs. And for the 10 percent who do, the six-year graduate rate is at 37 percent—20 percentage points below the national average, and eight percent below the average of Black students at predominately White colleges.

Riley’s article goes on to list more disappointing figures about HBCUs. Quoting a 2007 study by economists Roland Fryer of Harvard University and Michael Greenstone of MIT, the research finds that over the last 40 years, HBCU graduate’s earning power has decreased vastly. “In 1970s, HBCU matriculation was associated with higher wages and an increased probability of graduation, relative to attending a traditional college. By the 1990s, however, there is a substantial wage penalty. Overall 20 percent decline in the relative wages of HBCU graduates in two decades.” Fryer and Greenstone boldly concludes, “By some measures, HBCU attendance appears to retard Black progress.”

What’s more, Riley reports that SAT scores from students attending schools like Howard, Spelman, Morehouse, and other schools considered apart of the “Black Ivy League,” are significantly lower than those attending state schools. More plainly, the real HU is still Harvard.

And the HBCU statistical slam doesn’t end there. Enter Richard Vedder, director of the Center of College Affordability and Productivity, and economics professor at Ohio University.

Vedder backs Riley, affectionately calling him a great writer, and in words to follow his disdain for HBCUs, like: “I find the idea of race-based institutions of higher education very disturbing in this day and age.” Vedder goes on to give his empirical version of the ineffectiveness of HBCUs in a 21st century America.

Although quoting much of Riley’s piece, Vedder adds, “In the Forbes rankings (full disclosure: I am in charge of compiling them), there are some 610 schools ranked, and not one the HBCU’s makes the top half of that list.” Vedder mentions that Spelman is 59th in the US News & World Report rankings, stating that the ranking is “good but hardly the best.”

But why should HBCUs be best when statistically compared to historically White institutions? Spelman, as great as it is,  is still a school designed to educate the daughters of slaves. We can not fairly evaluate the academic progress of Black students attending HBCUs without evaluating race in America. The real question is, while Howard, Spelman, and Hampton are well endowed, does this partial government funding truly address the ailing infrastructural needs of these institutions that have lagged on since they were founded?

Many HBCU alums will admit that while they were culturally enriched—seeing students and professors campus-wide who look like them on a daily basis—most of these coveted institutions are administratively challenged. Financial aid can come through too late, and facilities and materials are vastly dated. One alum of Howard says, “The Howard financial aid office is like that one uncle who owes you money, you know he’s wrong, but he’s my uncle, and you can’t talk about him.”

Still, as Michael Lomax, president and CEO of the United Negro College Fund, argues in TheGrio.com, there are a plethora of positive attributes of HBCUs to consider. Lomax reminds us that HBCUs makes up only 4 percent of all 4-year institutions but produce more than 21 percent of all bachelor’s degrees awarded to African-Americans. Lomax continues, “A National Science Foundation study found that the top eight colleges producing African Americans who went on to get PhDs in science and engineering over the previous decade were HBCUs—ahead of Harvard, UC-Berkley, MIT, Brown and Stanford.”

It seems that as we progress further into a largely imaginative post-racial society, all Black institutions, from sororities to universities, are being called to task on relevancy and effectiveness. All the more reason for us to step our collective game up.

  • http://AirInDanYell.tumblr.com Erin

    I’m still trying to figure out why we as Black Americans have to get rid of all of traditions while White America can keep all of theirs with no problems and no comments made. Instead of down-talking HBCU’s, we should be happy that people of color are actually going to school and graduating in general, no matter where they decide to attend. I can’t stand this constant debate.

  • JustSayingMann

    Why is there a need to compare HBCUs to those where the population is primarily WHITE?

    I have heard Spelman college is turning out more professional black women than any “white” institution and has a higher graduation rate for black women than “white” institutions. Why would you seek to end that?

    Some black people don’t prosper where they are reminded of their minority status look up Edmund Perry.

    On the other hand I don’t believe most HBCUs are up to par not only in terms of academics, but also faculty. Many are more or less “party schools.” Truthfully there are only three I would even consider “black Ivy league”: Spelman College, Morehouse College, and Howard University. The rest need to step their game up.

    However, no one should undermine the reality that HBCUs are turning out black professionals and have been doing so for years before we were allowed to attend PWI.

    Where would we be without them?

  • Carlos

    I think that HBCU’s are of great importance. I totally agree with Erin with the fact that we should not debate as to whether we should abort our tradition for any kind of reason. HBCU’s are just as important as any other institution in America. Besides, what’s more American than tradition?

  • Junie

    I may be the minority in this opinion but I think that it is completely fair to compare HBCUs to either more ethnically mixed schools and historically white ones both public and private because they are businesses underneath. You wouldn’t invest your money in a business that wasn’t turning a profit no matter who owns it. Just like every other type of institution, there is a gamble with whether attendance is actually worth it. An investment of $15,000/yr. or $60,000 for a 4-yr bachelor’s degree for a career that pays less than $35,000 is not exactly a return on investment and loan payments come knocking after a while.

    These statistics are very generalized and vague. Some fields are very specific for what schools they accept employees from. The same is true for state colleges vs. private colleges vs. technical. Ultimately, it boils down to the individual’s own records and accomplishments, so they must evaluate what will get them those things. Degrees in several fields are declining in value not just ones from HBCU. Performance and experience from other independent non-school sources are accepted by employers and evaluated against people with degrees and no valid skills.

    I think rather than questioning whether they should exist The-Powers-That-Be should be debating ways to reform some of the internal problems of the HBCUs. The complaints and praises of my friends that are currently attending different HBCUs (Tuskegee, Clark Atlanta, Spelman, Morehouse, Savannah State): the party scene, the close-knit community, the archaic financial aid and adminstrative systems, intense Black Box”-ing, outdated materials, the social atmosphere outweighting education, and the pros and cons of tradition. They share a lot of issues with inner-city schools but you wouldn’t just can those either. Every type of school (art, online, technical, private, public) justifies their existence. Personally, what weighed against my decision to attend an HBCU was the cost, lack of global diversity and perspectives outside of the African diaspora, the lack of my intended majors at most HBCUs, and the rates of graduation and retention, but for some people it’s the perfect option.

  • http://CLUTCH ADRIAN HARRIS OF GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY

    HAIL!!! GOD THE FATHER ALMIGHTY!!! MAKER OF HEAVEN AND EARTH!!! LORD OF ALL THE COSMOS AND UNIVERSES AND BEYOND!!! HAIL!!! HAIL!!! SEPIA SPECTRUM SPECTACULARS!!!! MY COMMENT—–HUMM…. QUESTIONING THE NEED FOR THE EXISTENCE OF OUR HBCU’S. STATEMENT FROM THE ARTICLE AND MY ANSWER WHY WE NEED THEM—— “SPELMAN, AS GREAT AS IT IS, IS STILL A SCHOOL DESIGNED TO EDUCATE THE DAUGHTERS OF “SLAVES”.” NOW, WHY WE NEED THEM FROM PAGES 101 &102 FROM BEFORE THE MAYFLOWER;A BLACK HISTORY BY LERONE BENNETT JR.——–”EVERYTHING SUGGESTED THAT “SLAVE” MARRIAGES WERE RESILIENT INSTITUTIONS, UNENCUMBERED BY TRADITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS OF PROPERTY AND PATERNALISM.——you know our stats concerning marriages and the status of the black community. you know where most of all our men are and who leads our households—–are we better off than the slaves in this vital respect?…still think we don’t need our universities? ok; more——”IN ALMOST ALL CASES THE BRIDE WAS A “WORKER” WHO “TOILED” IN THE FIELDS “WITH” HER HUSBAND AND “OTHER MALES”. “SHE THUS ENTERED MARRIAGE AS A ” FREE SPIRIT” (WITHIN THE CONFINES OF A SYSTEM OF EQUALITY OF OPPRESSION) AND SHE WAS “FREE” TO “OPT OUT” WHEN SHE WANTED TO””.——Yep, that’s what i said to———-more—–”THE MARRIAGE SHE AND HER MATE “CONSUMMATED” WAS THUS A “LOVE MATCH” IN THE “TRUE” SENCE OF THE WORD”.——–so you’re thinking that in our schools the only thing we’re trying to do is JACK UP OUR IQ’S, have nasty sex(exaggerating by all means) and heaven forbid, “MARRY EACH OTHER” and get any job we find and have “HIGH IQed NASTY SEX(exaggerating of course.) MARRIGED SEEKING CHILDREN”——GO—DA—ED RIGHT!!! ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVES!!!! THAT’S EXACTLY WHAT WE’RE TRYING TO DO AT “GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY( NO HELL WE AREN’T WHITE)” —-more—–”IT WAS CUSTOMARY UNTIL RECENTLY TO SUGGEST THAT SLAVE MEN AND WOMEN LIVED A LIFE OF “RIOTOUS DEBAUCHERY” . BUT A “PATHFINDING” STUDY BY PROFESSOR “HERBERT G. GUTMAN” ( THE BLACK FAMILY IN SLAVERY AND FREEDOM) “DESTROYED” THAT MYTH AND “ESTABLISHED” 4 POINTS THAT ARE “CENTRAL” TO AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE SLAVE COMMUNITY AND THE BLACK FAMILY.” 1). “MOST SLAVES LIVED IN FAMILY UNITS HEADED BY A FATHER”…”headed”–all the dominate black males go to or seek to attend BLACK UNIVERSITES which are purposely made and maintained to principly attract us……”AND MOTHER, AND “LARGE” NUMBERS OF SLAVES LIVED IN LONG MARRIAGES,” SOME OF THIRTY OR MORE YEARS.” 2). “FATHERS WERE “{STRONG}” AND “{RESPECTED}” MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY CIRCLE, AND MALE CHILDREN WERE OFTEN NAMED FOR THEIR “{FATHERS}”.” ——as i said, all the Dominate Black Males are purposesly attracted to and respected by Black Women in BLACK UNIVERSITIES and this is the only place of “equality” where we are in “close” proximity to each other. 3). “PREMARITIAL SEX WAS FAIRLY COMMON, ALTHOUGH THE SLAVE COMMUNITY “EXPECTED” A PREMARITAL PREGNACY TO BE FOLLOED BY MARRIAGE. THE SLAVE COMMUNITY WAS MORE OPEN— AND MORE HONEST—ABOUT SEX, BUT IT DID NOT APPROVE OR CONDONE “{INDISCRIMINATE MATING}” AND “{BEGETTING}””…….don’t you just love some things about old school?……”MORE THAN THAT, THE SLAVE COMMUNITY “EXPECTED” “{MALES AND FEMALES TO REMAIN}” “{FAITHFUL}” AFTER MARRIAGE. ROBERT SMALLS, WHO LATER SERVED IN THE U.S. CONGRESS, TOLD THE AMERICAN FREEDMEN’S INQUIRY COMMISION IN 1863 THAT “IF A WOMAN LOSES HER HUSBAND, SHE MORNS FOR HIM AND WILL NOT MARRY FOR A YEAR AND A HALF UNLESS SHE IS “{DRIVEN BY WANT AND “MUST” HAVE SOMEBODY TO HELP HER}””. ——-you know our marriages, excuse my english, ain’t sh–t…….more……4). “IN SLAVERY, AND AFTERWARD, BLACK MARRIAGE WAS BUTRESSED BY EXTENDED FAMILY GROUPINGS THAT INCLUDED A WIDE RANGE OF PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS. THIS WAS THE INNER REALITY WITHIN THE VEIL THAT “{AMERICAN SLAVES CREATED BEHIND THE COTTON CURTAIN}.” ———–OF COURSE YOU DIDN’T NOTICE MONEY BEING MENTIONED HERE . HEY WHAT ABOUT JUST A DAMNED JOB?!! ….AND A INCREDIBLE EDUCATION!!!. LASTLY——-”FREEDOM WAS GETTING MARRIED BEFORE A PREACHER AND SIGNING PAPERS AND KNOWING IT WAS FOR ALWAYS AND NOT THE NEXT COTTON CROP. FREEDOM WAS BIBLES, CHURCHES AND STRONG DRINK. FREEDOM WAS TWO NAMES OF YOUR CHOOSING AND CHANGING THEM WHEN YOU PLEASED. HOW WAS A PERSON TO KNOW THAT HE WAS FREE IF HE COULDN’T SIT STILL AND WATCH THE SUN AND PULL ON HIS PIPE WHEN HE DIDN’T WANT TO DO ANYTHING ELSE? FREEDOM WAS GETTING UP WHEN YOU WANTED TO AND LYING DOWN WHEN THE SPIRIT HIT YOU. FREEDOM WAS DOING NOTHING ALSO. BUT OF THE HIGHEST CONCENTRATION: FREEDOM WAS “LAND AND LETTERS(EDUCATION)”: AN OPPORTUNITY TO “LEARN AND THE RIGHT — AND MEANS TO EARN ONE’S OWN BREAD.” ——————–LASTLY, IN RESPECTS OF THE KNOWLEGE OF THE MASS LYNCHINGS; EVERY TIME THEY HAD MASS LYNCHINGS, ONE OF OUR VIRILE RESPONCES WAS TO BUILD A BLACK COLLEGE AND FILL IT UP. THE OTHER OF COURSE WAS THE KILLING OF LARGE NUMBERS OF WHITE MEN. WE WOULD TURN BACK FROM THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD AND START KILLING AND BUILDING AND “WE STOPPED THOSE LYNCHINGS.” INSPIRED BY THE WORDS OF “DAVID WALKER”——LOOK UPON YOUR MOTHER, WIFE AND CHILDREN AND ANSWER “GOD ALMIGHTY”; AND “BELIEVE” THIS, THAT IT IS NO MORE HARM FOR YOU TO KILL A MAN, WHO IS TRYING TO KILL YOU, THAN IT IS TO TAKE A DRINK OF WATER WHEN THIRSTY.” ———-LERONE BENNETT JR.–BOOK BEFORE THE MAYFLOWER-A BLACK HISTORY, ISBN 978-0-87485-0079. LOVE Y’ALL SEPIA SPECTRUM PEOPLE. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER AND EAT NUTRIOUS FOODS. HOPE YOU CAN FIND SOME GOOD EXCECISE!!!!! GOODBYE Y’ALL!!! LOVE YE OME ANOTHER!!!! WE’LL WIN FASTER THEN!!!

  • Ashley

    I went from an HBCU to an integrated Community College and was astounded at all that the HBCU I had attended LACKED! Granted there is something about being around people you can relate to, learning from one another, where you may not have in a traditional integrated setting. However, the resources that the private 26k a year HBCU provided were of far less quality than my 3k a year integrated community college. HBCU’s need more funding. For schools like Howard University, if they spent as much time on homecomings and other social events, as they did on their academics, facilities and resources available to students, HBCUs would be up there with the Harvards and Yales, if not exceed them.

  • http://CLUTCH ADRIAN HARRIS OF GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY

    HAIL!!! YAHWEH ALYON(LORD MOST HIGH)!!!! ABBA!!! GOD THE FATHER MOST HIGH!!! HAIL!!!! SEPIA SPECTRUM PEOPLE!!!! TO: JUNE ON OCT. 29, 2010 AT 1:57PM—–YOUR COMMENT-VERY INTERESTING—-”BECAUSE THER’RE BUSINESSESS UNDERNEATH”—AND THAT YOU HAD AN MINORITY OPINION. SORRY ABOUT THE NEGATIVE THUMBS DOWN ALSO, I DIDN’T MEAN THAT. YOU’RE UP, UP,UP. MINORITY OPINIONS ARE VERY USEFUL IN DECISION MAKING AND VERY IMPORTANT. NEVER BE CONCERN OR FEEL OUT OF PLACE BECAUSE OF THIS IMPORTANT POWER. I’M HEAVYLY PREJUDICE FOR MY SCHOOLS. YOU BROUGHT UP THE SAME OBSERVATION AND OPINION THAT MY FELLOW FAMILY MEMBERS HAD DURING MY YEARS AS A INCREDIBLE….OH, THAT MEANS HBCU STUDENT. YOU ARE VERY CORRECT IN MOST EVERYTHING YOU HAVE VERY ACCURATELY OBSERVED. I MADE THESE SAME OBSERVATIONS AFTER AND BEORE MY SAT’S AND CAME TO THE SAME CONCLUSIONS. BUT BACK TO YOUR OBSERVATION ABOUT US BEING A BUSINESS UNDERNEATH. BACK IN 80 – 81 SOME OF OUR BUSINESS STUDENTS HAD THE SAME QUESTION/OBSERVATION/THOUGHTS—WAS GRAMBLING, UNDERNEATH A BUSINESS? AS A STUDENT IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES I WAS VERY ATTENTIVE TO THIS CONVERSATION I JUST HAPPENED BY ON, BUT MY MIND ACCLERATED TO AN ANSWER—NO!! REASON: PROFIT!!! BUSINESSES ARE MEANT TO MAKE PROFITS, RICHNESS, HELL BABY—MONEY(THANK YOU LORD)!! THEN GO TO THE BANK. THEY CAME TO THE SAME CONCLUSION. THERE THOUGHT PROCESSES WERE EXACTLY LIKE YOURS. THEY CAME TO THE SAME INITIAL CONCLUSION. BUT, THE BLACK UNIVERSITIES PROFIT IS THE FREEDOM OF THE BLACK MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD’S MIND. REALLY, THAT MONEY IS FOR US AND IS SPENT ON US FOR OUR LIGHTS, HOUSING, FOOD, ACCESS TO OUR PROFESSORS- -WHOM ARE THE DOOR TO OUR WILDEST DREAMS AND IMAGINATIONS(THEY HAVE TO BE PAID AND ANY GOOD WILL GO FOR $150.000/YEAR EASY), SECURITY, RECREATION, SUPPLIES———–ECT. ITS ALL SPENT ON US. NONE IS PUT IN A BANK AND SPENT BY SOMEBODY FOR THEIR OWN REWARD AND COMFORT. AND AT GRAMBLING THE “SGA” WATCHES THAT MONEY—–DAMMIT!! NOW AT HARVARD THEIR TUITION RIGHT NOW, THE LAST TIME I READ, IS $50,000 A YEAR. NOT BAD WHEN YOU CONSIDER THEM THE BEST SCHOOL IN AMERICA IF NOT THE WORLD. THEY SHOULD BE, LORD—1,000,000/YEAR EASY. HOW THEY COMBAT TUITION RAISES IS THAT THEY HAVE HUGE ENDOWMENT AND INVEST THESE MONEIES IN DIFFERENT PLACES AND COME HOME WITH A PROFIT AND AXE DOWN ON THAT TUTION WITH THESE PROFITS. OF COURSE THEY LOSE IN INVESTMENTS, BUT THEY INVEST SO DIVERSELY AND NUMEROUSLY THAT THEY MKE UP FOR WHAT THEY LOOSE. THAT WHY HAVARD’S ONLY $50,000 DOLLARS A YEAR. BLACK SCHOOLS DREAMS ARE THAT THE ONLY QULIFICATION YOU HAVE TO MEET IS ACADEMIC/SOCIAL QUALIFICATION. DAMN EVERYTHING ELSE. THIS I KNOW . LOVE YE ONE ANOTHER AND WE’LL WIN MUCH QUICKER. LOVE YOUR BLACK SELVES INCLUDING THAT ONE IN THE MIRROR!!!! BYE!!!

  • Junie

    I agree with the summation that vital resources in HBCUs should be channeled into more educational ventures. I feel like HBCUs are being unfairly singled out when other schools are guilty of the exact same thing. I can vouch that lagging behind not an experience unique to HBCUs (specifically institutions that have less rigid admissions). There’s a huge disparity in the quality of learning in different higher learning institutes. I had a similarly enlightening experience in transferring from an 22k private art school costing me 10k in loans per year to a cheaper, full-expense paid public state college. I had the similar mentality that it would be in my best interest to be around people that related to me on a level (artists) that I wouldn’t get a tradition college/university. The facilities and equipment were nice but the rigor and depth of courses were below industry standards while the state college’s performance is more thorough and competitive. Ivy League schools force students to perform miracles to get in but they too are fighting prove their usefulness with the current economic state. A $200,000 degree is useless when you can’t get hired. Criticism should go full circle to all colleges and universities. When it is possible for a self-educated person to surpass even the most decorated college graduate, there is proof that it matters not where you learn but the quality of content that you learn and what you do with it.

  • lafemmenaturalle

    agreed

  • Alexandra

    Not long ago, it was reported that some of these schools are growing in the number of non-black identified students. Which is a good thing in my opinion.
    But well HBCU’s are apart of American history. They’re there for a reason.

  • julienne

    Erin – well stated!!!

  • julienne

    It is unfair to compare a private HBCU to a state-run community college simply because of the federal funding involved. HBCUs are struggling because alumni contributions and federal support is scarce.

    As a Howard alum, I can attest that our network and legacy is unmatched. If I had to go through the entire college admission process, I’d honestly only consider an Ivy university over HU.

  • Isis

    I definitely think they are still needed.

  • Chante’l

    HBCUs are a vital national resource and has served as the pivot of African-American leadership. Although drastic changes have taken place in the past years, the central goal of HBCUs and the education of black students for service and leadership roles in the black community has been accomplished and still proceeding in great strength. These institutions produce a great percentage of all black college graduates. Historically Black College/University enrollees confer one-third of all bachelor’s degrees earned by blacks. Most of the world’s largest businesses and corporations are ran by HBCU graduates. Historically-Black Colleges/ Universities serve a good source to the culture of African-Americans around the world. Attending a HBCU is a grand opportunity. HBCUs are establishments that African-Americans can call their own. To continue the cycle of high achievement, black students must stand and prosper the legacy that the HBCU institutions has to offer the Black community.

  • Melanie

    Yes, if you constantly screw over a group of people and their colleges, the stats are going to be lower. Fucking duh. That’s really not a surprise.

    And this is ridiculous: “I find the idea of race-based institutions of higher education very disturbing in this day and age.”
    People are angry because _maybe_ I might want to go to a college where I will have to deal with significantly less racist bullshit? Where I might get to see more than three people who look like me everyday? Where I might not hear, “I just don’t find brown skin attractive”? I am terrible. Clearly. That is just. How could I? Instead I should go to an HWCU (fucking all of them). That will truly cement my racial progressiveness. Because white is the default, you know, so it’s not worth pointing out that these are historically white institutions that black people were legally barred from attending at one point, and that many black people are effectively barred from attending even now.

  • Kate

    I believe that it is time we look past the differences and accept the new more diverse way of living. I attend a predominately white college! Yes it is sometimes a little wierd being that I am always the only black student in my course. Yet, there are other blacks who attend my school although the rate is very low. I have made friends with my classmates and other students on campus who are white. I don’t see the reason to attend an HBCU because we are not segregated and it gives students little options to view other cultures and ethnic groups. There are asian, arabs, white and black students at my school who excel well above the standards. I am not saying that people shouldn’t attend HBCU’s if the choose to but attending a predominately or more diverse university or college can be an A+. I’ve never felt so relieved in my life to participate in educational activities, my school offers a full scholarship for studying abroad and every semester I strive for good academics. I’ve been on the deans list twice and coming from a less priviliged background than my peers I give my self credit for my accomplishments. Every African American doesn’t come from a broken home of a mom and a dad on the other side of town. A wealthy family on one side and a unfortuante family on the otherside with different views in beliefs. Yet, I am fortunate to attend a school that expands my learning opportunities and resources. I have great professor who actually are professors and not TA’s! Each one of my business professors are either business owners or have work for major coporations. Many of my English professors were film writers, editors for big film directors and play writers. Once again it is okay to attend the school of your choice but give yourself a push and show people that you can excel in academics set above standards.

  • Ginger

    Did they not teach you that writing in ALL CAPS is annoying?

  • Ginger

    I went to a predominately white state school and loved my experience. Still, I can appreciate HBCU’s and hope the best for their continued growth.

    However, some of the Black students from HBCU’s in my grad program are really quick to put down predominately white institutions (although our grad program is at one). From my experiences, they aren’t any better off. The women are MORE catty than any Black woman from a state school. In fact, a couple are self-hating. I know this doesn’t represent every HBCU grad but their bad-mouthing my “black experience” at a big state school is laughable.

    So, if the feeling of brotherhood/sisterhood wasn’t fostered from their time at an HBCU, what’s the real benefit? (I’m not asking in a snarky way…I just really have no clue).

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