The holiday season is not only about gorging ourselves with tasty treats, hob-knobbing at parties, and getting cool gifts. It’s also about giving.

This year UNICEF and MSNBC teamed up to support the K.I.N.D.: Kids In Need of Desks campaign. This wonderful operation is raising money to provide 46,000 desks for 172 schools in UNICEF Malawi’s Schools for Africa network.

Malawi is one of the world’s least developed and most densely populated countries. It is home to many different African tribes as well as Asians and Europeans. While the economic challenges are great for this nation, it’s increasingly doing a better job of supporting its people. Which is where we come in.

Many in the United States take public education for granted because it’s free and accessible. However, in many places around the world this isn’t the case. While education in Malawi isn’t mandatory, in 1994 the government established free primary schools for its children. More and more kids are taking advantage of the chance to be educated, but many have to learn in uncomfortable, and sometimes unsafe, conditions.

With your help, the K.I.N.D. campaign hopes to change that!

Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, or none of the above, giving kids the gift of education is perfect way to end the year.

Check out this video from MSNBC’s “The Last Word” and find out why you should be K.I.N.D. this holiday season.

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Join with CLUTCH and BUY A DESK FOR A CHILD!

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  • Alexandra

    Nice campaign. It takes a lot to give.

  • African Mami

    Noble campaign. BUT couldn’t he find a more genius way of introducing Malawi to the world other than presenting it as a dilapidated country? People are going to draw a lot of conclusions from that statement alone. PLEASE DO BETTER MSNBC FOLKS!

    ‘Malawi is not a big vacation destination. It is one of the poorest countries in the world. The entire country is a high risk malaria zone, HIV/AIDS has spread to 12% of Malawi’s 15 million people. Life expectancy is 53 years.’