Beyoncé has finally debuted the video for her new single, “Run the World (Girls)”. It aired last night on primetime television during American Idol, truly showing us just how bright her star is shining.

In the video, she rocks a slew of high-fashion looks including Emilio Pucci, Gareth Pugh, Givenchy Couture, Alexander McQueen and many more. Each look highlights Beyoncé’s more svelte and lean figure due to her training with exercise guru to the stars Tracy Anderson. The images of her avant-garde ensembles have been circulating on the web for weeks, thus it was nice to see them come to life in real-time and not just on the runway.


The video is right in line with what Beyoncé does best: high energy dancing mixed with attitude and out of this world fashion. On the other hand, it seems to contradict the message of the song.

Yes, a woman can be empowered and in touch with her sexuality but that’s only one facet of who we are. In this video, however, sexuality seems like the primary focus.

For Run The World (Girls), Beyonce is overly sexual, which of course is part of her brand. She gyrates in revealing clothes (and most notably in a close-up where the side of her butt is uncovered and clearly visible). Though I know plenty of sexual and powerful women, these particular clips seem designed more to cater to male fantasies than to claim independence and empowerment among women. With her thigh-high slits, visible undergarments and gyrating moves, we have to ask: Is this what empowerment means today? Is the women’s empowerment movement merely about sexuality?

The lyrics present the same conundrum. Beyonce sings “Strong enough to bear the children, then get back to business.” This line is so strong but where are the women in the video who are portraying that idea? And do lyrics like “These B*tches Can’t Fade Me” truly uplift or antagonize other women?

Job well done for a visually stimulating video, but it would have been nice to see something that acknowledges the modern day working woman and not just the one in a revealing bodysuit breaking it down to a dance track.

Scroll through to see more images and fashions from the video.

What do you think of Beyoncé’s new video? Do you feel that the song and video are empowering?

-Faith Cummings

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  • P

    and about her being an entertainer? how is watching this lady shake her stuff entertaining? Why is that entertaining?

  • C in Cleveland

    With each album, we expect to see some level of growth and creativity. Unfortunately, Beyonce’s approach continues to be formulaic; revealing costumes, highly suggestive moves, lame club beats – not a game changer. Beyonce seems afraid to move out of her comfort level. Sexual expression has been the entertainment standard for years. There’s nothing new or even shocking about it. We were scratching our heads back in’97 when kindergarteners were quoting Lil Kim like scripture. Now nothing shocks us. I won’t even bother with the moral argument, I’m just asking for something that hasn’t been dusted off and recycled 10,000+ times.