Rick Santorum is doubling down on his anti-Obama religious rhetoric. After claiming the President believed in a “phony theology,” yesterday Santorum said the President is apart of a secular plot to strip believers of their faith.

During an interview with Glenn Beck, Santorum explained why he thought President Obama wants to encourage more people to go to college.

“I understand why Barack Obama wants to send every kid to college, because of their indoctrination mills, absolutely,” he said. “The indoctrination that is going on at the university level is a harm to our country.”

Never mind that college-educated people out-earn their less educated counterparts or that increasingly more jobs require a degree, Rick Santorum thinks the President is trying to turn you into a satanic pawn.

To back up his hypothesis, Santorum quoted some faulty statistics, citing that “62 percent of kids who go into college with a faith commitment leave without it.”

While it’s true that higher education levels sometimes leads some to questioning religious beliefs, this is probably due in part to the individual’s ability to think critically about the faith they grew up with. However, a study by University of Nebraska-Lincoln sociologist Philip Schwadel found the opposite to be true.

Santorum’s rhetoric comes just as questions about the church’s role in government (and vice versa) reached a fevered pitch.

After the Obama Administration mandated that all health care providers would have cover contraception without a co-pay, many in the Catholic church cried foul. After concessions by the Administration were made to ensure that religious organizations would not have to pay for contraception if it violates their religious teachings, many on the Right continued to argue that the government was overreaching.

Throughout this election cycle Sen. Santorum has continued to bring up religion and Santorum’s wife has even said that God wants her husband to run for president to save the country from President Obama.

While the founding fathers explicitly stated, “No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust,” it seems like many in the Republican party are attempting to do just that.

What do you think? Does religion have a place in political discourse? 

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