Photo via Consider magazine

Let’s call a spade a spade.

There are many people across Black America that have a problem with homosexuality.  And by Black I mean descendants of African slaves, first generation African-Americans, Cablasian or whatever particular Black applies to avoid the “we are not a monolith” argument.

Initially, the criticism stemmed directly from the Christian Bible — or rather, how people chose to interpret the “Good Book.” Hidden beneath tales of murder, rape, adultery, incest and all other sorts of sordid straight sins, most evangelicals leeched unto a little scripture that was directed towards priests in Leviticus that states “thou shall not lay with mankind as womankind.”

Then a strange thing happened.

People began to think. Discussions began to rage on not only the separation of church and state, but the validity of the argument that homosexuality was even addressed significantly enough to be considered a “sin” in the first place. And even if it were addressed, what in the hell did that have to do with whether or not the LGBT community should be tarred, feathered, marked with a scarlet “G” and thrown unprotected into a vicious court of public opinion?

Nothing.

So as the religious argument continues to fray at the seams, a new tact is gaining traction; a transparent tact to be sure, but one that is spoken with all the venom and narrow-minded indignation of the Tea Party shouting angrily that they “want their America back”:

“The LGBT community is trying to piggyback on the struggles of descendants of African slaves to further their own agenda.”

That’s right. It has nothing to do with the fact that there has always been an underlying aversion to homosexuality within our communities. Well, at least of the male variety because the war cries are oddly muted when threesomes and lesbianism is discussed. For some reason, in this patriarchal society the male fantasy of two women doing the horizontal mambo while an eager man watches and/or participates trumps any aversion to gay — but that’s another article. Homophobes would like us to believe that it’s a matter of cultural treachery. The LGBT community dares to equate the fact that they are ostracized, not afforded equal rights under the law, bullied, assaulted, killed, mocked, belittled and treated like second-class citizens to the atrocities of the Jim and Jane Crow South.

Even more disturbing, what happens when gays and lesbians over-run society and the eugenics plot to kill Black babies is complete?! Never mind that for more gay people to be born, it stands to reason that more straight people would have to have sex, canceling out the entire homosexuality will end the human race argument.

How dare they, right?

Wrong.

Yes, we had the Civil Rights Movement but we do not hold the patent on civil rights. Secondly, there is no separate LGBT community when some of our brothers and sisters are included in the group. Does a person automatically become “them” once their sexual orientation is revealed? I have tried and tried to understand this argument, but there are just too many holes in it. Just as slave marriages were once illegal and miscegenation laws prevented inter-racial marriages, it is equally archaic to deny two adults their civil liberties based on nothing more than religious conjecture and pain ownership.

It’s disturbing to see people use the same book that has been used to justify slavery through the Curse of Canaan to justify discrimination toward the LGBT community. It’s pathetic to watch people use the same court system that has marginalized and enslaved us as an excuse for oppressing people because of the circumstances their birth.

Is the battle that the LGBT community is facing on religious, political and cultural fronts equal to what Black people in America had to face and continue to face?

No, but it cannot and should not be minimized by that fact.

Injustice is injustice, whether due to the color of our skin , the content of our character or sexual orientation.

Let’s not be on the wrong side of history on this one.

120 Comments

  1. Daniel Jackson

    No, gays haven’t suffered more historically, but I think the struggle is going to be much longer. Thanks to the Bible, it will be many centuries for acceptance, if ever.

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