Amandala Stenberg Snaps Back at Racist Haters

by Risa Dixon

Since the release of the movie, “The Hunger Games” last weekend, there have been a lot of racial tension directed toward the three Black cast members, especially the beautiful 13-year-old Amandala Stenberg who plays the character of Rue. The film grossed $155 million thus far, but “fans” took to twitter to express their displeasure with the fact that the beloved character was played by an African American girl. Stenberg fired back at her racist haters with this classy statement Wednesday:

“As a fan of the books, I feel fortunate to be part of The Hunger Games family…It was an amazing experience; I am proud of the film and my performance. I want to thank all of my fans and the entire Hunger Games community for their support and loyalty.”

It still boggles ones mind as to why this young actress received all of this hate and criticism when it clearly states in The Hunger Games books that Rue was a girl with dark brown skin.

The teen starlets’ name means power and she has shown her strength by not letting the negative attention she’s been receiving take make her stoop down to the level of her critics or downplay the amazing job she did in the movie.

  • CurlySue

    She’s pretty much the cutest thing I’ve ever seen. And she seems to have a level head on her. She did a fantastic job in that movie and should feel nothing but pride. Haters gonna hate, and such.

  • CAsweetface

    This isn’t really a “snap back” like the post states. She’s definitely taking the high road with her succinct response I will say. Good for her!

  • DeAnnR

    So much for our post racial sociey

  • apple

    Can I steal her ?! She’s so cute I’m Gona explode 0_O

  • Velma

    The practice of “whitening” blacks in Hollywood will ALWAYS continue as long as there are people who “go along”.

  • jamesfrmphilly

    she is a black girl?

  • HowApropos…

    She’ll go far…

  • jamesfrmphilly

    “Rue was a girl with dark brown skin”

    this actress does not have dark brown skin…..

  • Yb

    They had to compromise and cast a light skin biracial girl instead.

    Still, she did do justice to the role.

  • Ms. Information

    lol @ james….you are right, but anything darker would have sccaarrd de whit folk…lol…they are already tripping on her, and she looks as if she may be mixed with white.

  • Shay

    She’s mixed, but she’s claiming black for the role. That’s what they do when it benefits them.

  • CurlySue

    Yes, Amandala is mixed. But movies often take small liberties with a book’s character description. For instance, in the Harry Potter books, it’s noted often that his eyes are green. But Daniel Radcliffe has bright blue eyes. And really, who cares? If that actor/actress can bring that character to life the best, then it’s foolish to nitpick because the exact shade of Amandala’s skin is slightly lighter.

  • omfg

    i also was thinking she isn’t black. bothers me when biracial people become the representatives of blackness when lots of times they don’t even want to be considered that.

  • omfg

    it’s not foolish or nitpicking to want people to stop using mixed women as a proxy for black women, esp. when that individual is supposed to be portrayed as dark skinned in a movie.

    give the little black girls something to aspire to and admire…

    plus, i imagine that the author made this sympathetic character into a dark skinned girl for a reason. maybe it communicates that little dark girls are worth something too. or people should love them too.

    things you may think are irrelevant actually mean something to others.

  • http://cupofjo-jo.blogspot.com bk chick

    @omfg I believe the author picked a dark skin black girl as rue because, for some liberal whites, blackness is the ultimate symbol of their humanity, because accepting someone who they historically are supposed to hate shows they are not that bad after all. Ironically, it dehumanizes the character because they are used as a device. I agree with this :” stop using mixed women as a proxy for black women” ..If It didn’t happen so often in movies I wouldn’t have a problem with it…but hey that’s Hollywood for you.

  • CurlySue

    I do see what you’re saying. But people who saw the movie still saw her as a black girl. Not a mixed girl. That was made clear by the disgusting tweets about her. So, her mixed-ness didn’t benefit her here. Also, the book is from Katniss’s perspective. As Katniss had likely never seen a black person (mixed or otherwise), Rue’s skin color would have probably looked quite dark to her anyway, in comparison to the tanned but still white people from her district. Also, and this may be splitting hairs, but Amandala’s features are clearly of African origin. If they had casted a younger version of Rashida Jones, I could more easily understand the disapproval. But while Amandala’s skin tone may be lighter than you imagined, her facial features and hair texture in the movie clearly identify her as a little black girl.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    Ain’t that the truth. I still support her though.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    I know so she didn’t even fit the role. We should stop settling for less.

  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

    @ my sister,

    And really, who cares?
    I do.

    If that actor/actress can bring that character to life the best, then it’s foolish to nitpick because the exact shade of Amandala’s skin is slightly lighter.

    I hear you. BUT, how many times have you seen a dark sister. It is always the light skinned one….which is FINE! However, the problem comes about when the light skinned sister’s worth is appreciated more than the dark skinned one!

    Now, in regards to Amandala getting the role, I’m very very happy!!! Looks like we are going somewhere, although this couldn’t be farther from reality and truth. In the future, I would like to see more Amandala’s of a darker hue….shoot me!

  • LikeTotally!

    Mixed people want so BAD to be classified as ‘mixed’ and yet, they still want to claim blackness when it suits them.

    I throw no shade at this little girl, but her ilk is infuriating to deal with.

  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

    @LT

    It’s called tailor made race!

  • jamesfrmphilly

    there are no dark brown skinned actresses in the world?

  • http://method2hermadness.blogspot.com girlformerlyknownasgrace

    Seriously guys? She is pretty with minimal make-up. She cant win with white people, and clearly she cant win with some blacks either. Blame those who cast her, not this actress for being born with her skin tone.

  • http://method2hermadness.blogspot.com girlformerlyknownasgrace

    I do she the overall point of wanting darker people in general, but let this girl have her day. She is so adorable. And she gives Willow Smith a run for ber money.

  • random

    Yes! Thank you. ugh.

  • Lola

    Well she’s obviously black to many of those racist tweeters, no matter how light skinned she is. Please don’t blame a young girl who’s already had enough shitty comments about her being black and now she has to deal with more shitty comments from people of her own race. Sad.

  • Sexy Mix

    @omfg and LT , How would you possibly know how all biracial people feel and what they consider themselves?? you both sound real childish and hateful throwing shade on a little girl. Would you want someone doing that to your dark black child?

  • Sexy Mix

    Exactly! Thank you. glad all of us aren’t uniformed and ignorant.

  • Sexy Mix

    *correction- uninformed

  • CurlySue

    @Mami, I do see your point. And there’s no doubt that Hollywood scarcely promotes darker skinned actresses. I can only think of Gabrielle Union and Angela Bassett right now. It’s just this little girl has already faced way more cruelty from racist non-blacks in the past couple days. No need for those who she likely identifies with to say disparaging things about her heritage. Not that you were. But some others here have.

  • Anne

    @CurlySue

    Comparing eye colour to skin colour is far from the same thing, faaaar from it. I have to agree with omfg and the others stating that it’s high time hollywood stopped swapping (or settling for) lighter skinned women where a woman of darker brown skin is supposed to be portrayed. We see it over and over again, and honestly, I don’t see it happening often with black men, which just goes to show how sharply the ideals of beauty are stricter for women than for me, and how they usually favour those who fit into the white/eurocentric ideal of things.

    And even if she is considered ‘black’ to white people, let’s not forget that the reasons why she is considered black is rooted in a racist white supremacist ideology. Pointing this out isn’t being ignorant or misinformed. In places like South Africa, where I now reside, mixed-race people identify as such and have cultivated their own identity even throughout the harsh history of this country, and even though the classification came about as a divide and conquer strategy.

    This isn’t a critique on Amandla so her ‘cuteness’ and talent are not what is in question, I’m not in any way trying to say that she did not deserve the role. Rather, it is a larger reflection on Hollywood and the Western ideals of beauty, and how they affect black women. Think of all the little darker skinned girls who continually see these images and how it affects them.

    Lastly, her name is AMANDLA not Amandala, lol. Jeez.

  • Anne

    @CurlySue

    Comparing eye colour to skin colour is far from the same thing, faaaar from it. I have to agree with omfg and the others stating that it’s high time hollywood stopped swapping (or settling for) lighter skinned women where a woman of darker brown skin is supposed to be portrayed. We see it over and over again, and honestly, I don’t see it happening often with black men, which just goes to show how sharply the ideals of beauty are stricter for women than for me, and how they usually favour those who fit into the white/eurocentric ideal of things.

    And even if she is considered ‘black’ to white people, let’s not forget that the reasons why she is considered black is rooted in a racist white supremacist ideology. Pointing this out isn’t being ignorant or misinformed. In places like South Africa, where I now reside, mixed-race people identify as such and have cultivated their own identity even throughout the harsh history of this country, and even though the classification came about as a divide and conquer strategy.

    This isn’t a critique on Amandla so her ‘cuteness’ and talent are not what is in question, I’m not in any way trying to say that she did not deserve the role. Rather, it is a larger reflection on Hollywood and the Western ideals of beauty, and how they affect black women. Think of all the little darker skinned girls who continually see these images and how it affects them.

    Lastly, her name is AMANDLA not Amandala, lol. Jeez.

  • Anne

    Lastly, congrats to her for rising above!

  • CurlySue

    Yes, I know eye color and skin color aren’t the same. It was merely an example that came to mind. And I absolutely agree that fairer-skinned women get more screen time and more praise in general. Unfortunately, that’s very common in this world: India, Latin America, Asia. the Middle East, some parts of Africa. All tying back to colonialism. I guess that since this was such a positive blog post I was hoping that the comments would be more supportive and loving towards the actress and her gracefulness in the face of such nastiness, regardless of her heritage, instead of being used for some people (not you or Mami) to be rather catty/disparaging.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    “From her own race?”

    Whites are her own race too. It’s not black people’s job to save and defend bi-racial people. Are you seriously going with the racist notion that we should just accept anyone with black blood? You’re defending racism with racism.

  • sweetpisces

    Let’s be real. To the haters (white people, cause that’s the majority having an issue with this role), Amandla not ‘Amandala’ is black regardless of how light she appears to the black community. So, of course she will be hated on for snagging such a stand-out role. Such foolishness will always arise whenever a person of color is seen too much on camera. I bet if she was an extra we wouldn’t be having this problem. I’m just thrilled the author actually included diversity in her novel cause not many do. And the movie was good and it did accumulate a lot so can all the haters just shut up already. Amandla can eat, but can you?

  • Monique

    Wow, this little girl has people slamming her for being black & now she has people slamming her for not being black enough! Black or biracial, we still face much of the same racism- ask President Obama! I hope she stays strong and doesn’t let anyone stop her shine.

  • Tracey

    Monique – I totally agree. Sorry folks, I stopped reading when this young lady was blamed for not being Black enough! Can we please stop fighting over this? As you can see – for some people no matter how Black we are we’re still too Black – and that’s the real issue. Hopefully those ignorant rants will make more Blacks more determined to play roles in Hollywood – no matter what color the script says they are!!

  • Bosslady

    What do you mean by her “ilk” (I’m confused) Did you mean irk?

    I digress, her statement was not in response to the naysayers, she is merely thanking her fans… The title of the article is a little misleading. Also, when did she claim to be black?? , She merely is thanking the fans! It was a raceless statement! To be honest, although the person in the book is described as having “dark brown skin” to most white people a mixed race person’s skin would be dark brown to them. But yes, they could have chosen someone who is “fully” black, but it’s here nor there…

  • raah

    She did a brilliant job. I’m just as upset with the issue of Hollywood using mixed girls much more often than brown skin and darker skin girls to depict black women. Still, we should remind ourselves that we’ve come along way, and that the dial is still moving. Think about films in the 30s, 40s,etc. that used Jewish girls to depict black women because of the texture of their hair!

  • SiGhyyy

    If im not mistaken this girl is half jewish just to add what raah was saying

  • Leo the Yardie Chick

    “It still boggles ones mind as to why this young actress received all of this hate and criticism when it clearly states in The Hunger Games books that Rue was a girl with dark brown skin.”

    Because folks are both stupid and semi-literate. Apart from the racism, I saw a lot of evidence of poor reading comprehension from the next generation of leaders. Not the best of signs.

  • Leo the Yardie Chick

    She may not have ‘dark’ brown skin, but the racist tweeters were as pissed as if she had been 150% black. Just goes to show that no matter which light, or half-black actress H-Wood casts, she still gets treated like a ‘full’ black actress by the audience.

  • CurlySue

    @Bosslady: By “ilk” I believe she meant other bi-racial people.

  • apple

    so black people yall really complaining how that she isn’t dark enough?? this is why there is no community at all
    i looked just like her as a kid (and my young niece looks like her too) what to be black we all gotta be dark as night or some sh*t?? damn ruined my happy moment for this little girl

  • Yb

    We are speaking out against, not complaining, the fact a biracial girl is playing in a role that called for a mono racial black girl.

  • Neka

    Exactly what I was thinking. For some white people she’s not white enough. For some black people she’s not dark enough. I think she is a beautiful little girl and I’m happy that she got the part. At first I wasn’t interested in the movie but now I’m going to go see it. To me she’s black and I’m showing my support.

  • Sexy Mix

    ” Because folks are both stupid and semi-literate. Apart from the racism, I saw a lot of evidence of poor reading comprehension from the next generation of leaders. Not the best of signs.”

    I wish this site had a ‘like’ or ‘thumbs up’ button, :)

  • Sexy Mix

    “i looked just like her as a kid (and my young niece looks like her too) what to be black we all gotta be dark as night or some sh*t?? damn ruined my happy moment for this little girl”

    Exactly, because she is a kid- not someone to direct all misguided color issues at, like it’s her fault. and I hope nothing ruins her happy moments.
    some of the things Black people said here are even more stupid than what the white people said.

    @YB, yes some of you are complaining. If you want to speak out and want your voices heard/make a change, do it at the producers, directors, writers, etc.,( and it should have been done long ago) not at the child who was chosen for a role.

  • binks

    She is a cute little girl and good for her for not acknowledging the stupidity in people who clearly have a problem with reading comprehension, and clearly her being biracial didn’t save her from being call everything but her name so…shrugs like girlformerlyknownasgrace mention blame the people that cast her not the actress herself

  • NoitAll

    @TheVoiceOfReason
    Preach! The “One Drop” rule needs to go the way of the dinosaurs.

  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

    @ gfkag

    no-one is casting blame for her look, we are just talking about the realities of the film world. Light skin stays winning, dark skin stays losing….can’t there be a balance, in casting. that’s all. Otherwise, I’m happy for miss thang!

  • David Garstang

    She was not what I had pictured, but she totally won me over! Because the book said she reminded Katniss of her little sister, I expected her to look more like Prim, and didn’t read the description closely enough. Amandala is an amazing actress. She captured Rue’s vulnerability and bravery perfectly, and the chemistry she and Jennifer developed was incredible. I was bawling my eyes out there at the end, and just wish she could be in the next two.

  • Ms. Information

    I am proud of this little girl, she is a cutie pie and I wish her success…I think the point that is being missed is that characters meant to be dark skinned, are often lightened to make audiences more comfortable. I’ve heard white people say about Beyonce and other lightskinned blacks that “their not reaaaallly black”. Whites have and always have been more comfortable with lighter skinned blacks, its just a fact. Lena Horne, Halle Berry…its just a fact. The character Storm from the X-men comics was described as a black woman with dark skin, yet they used Halle to market the movie to a vast audience.

  • David Garstang

    I’m just sorry that people on *both* extremes (“too xxx” vs. “not xxx enough”) weren’t able to simply appreciate this terrific performance for what it was. They brought all this baggage into the movie with them, and they really missed out because of it. It is my profound hope that this marvelous young woman won’t be hurt by all the people who are using her (brilliant, in my opinion) casting to promote their own racial agendas.

  • Lola

    My first impression and many others was that she looked like a cute little black girl regardless of her skin tone. She is already treated like a black girl in America, probably more so than someone that looks like Rashida Jones. Her first name is Zulu for power, she wears hair styles that are worn by young black girls, she will probably acknowledge both ancestries, and she has been called horrible racist slurs, at this point she will or already have acknowledged both ancestries (nothing wrong with that), but it seems she will end up identifying strongly with blacks.

    There was no point of people bringing this shadeism up, when the real issue was about racist tweeters who could not give a shit about which shade is lighter. I’m honestly tired of people who think they can dictate what is black or not. And don’t think the one drop rule will not help racial relations,but further divide the black community, just look at South America.

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  • sheely

    OH,give the sister a break! We can whine on and on forever about her being mixed (and to be honest, I really don’t know if she is or not—just because someone is/looks light-skinned dosen’t always mean they’re mixed) but the reality is, as long as WHITE people are running Hollywood, they’re gonna pick/cast for films whoever fits THEIR standard of beauty,like they ALWAYS have! I think it’s unnecessary and counterproductive to complain about this young actress not being “dark” enough when the reality is,as a black actress she’s still gonna have to hustle harder for the next big part than the average little white actress her age is.

    Obviously some of these posters have issues with the whole light-skin-dark skin issue, but let’s be real—sometimes we as black people are guilty as hell of continuing to perpetuate that issue in our communities, even though we know damn well that whole stupid skin color issue was created by white folks for THEIR benefit,not ours, and to keep us divided, which it clearly still is!

    That being said, let the girl have her moment to shine—she already has enough haters from the white audience as it is! Plus she looks even cuter in the current issue of ESSENCE—where she looks more brown,BTW—sometimes people look different according to how they are lit for a photograph—and, no ALL mixed-race people don’t believe they’re better just because they’re part white–but white society encourages to believe that BS.

  • ohsnap

    Black people are one of the most self-hating and self-defeating people I know. Too light, too dark, not black enough, too black, mixed, not mixed. This needs to stop! Not too long ago it didn’t matter how light skinned a black person was…they weren’t allowed in the door. Period. As a black woman I want to say STOP THE HATE. Be glad when one of our people gets an opportunity. Try supporting instead of tearing down. And for the record, there is NO SUCH THING as a pure ‘mono-racial’ (the most stupid term I have heard in a long time) race. Go back far enough and everyone is mixed. Stop the hate.

  • ohsnap

    “but let’s be real—sometimes we as black people are guilty as hell of continuing to perpetuate that issue in our communities…” TRUE and we all know it.

  • TheBestAnonEver, Part 2

    I was confused about the title. She didn’t ‘snap’ back, she responded.

    I expect better from this blog.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    That still doesn’t make her fully black. No matter how she’s treated. If you are treated, and perceived as a whore does that make you one?

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    If she was a dark-skinned black girl we wouldn’t even defend her like this.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    So in order to not to perpetuate this issue we must accept racist standards created by whites? Why must we also accept bi-racial people as if that is our job? Why can’t they have their own racial identity like in many other countries?

    Did you ever notice that bi-racial people aren’t quite black but better until they cross the line?

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    Really? Why aren’t you excluding whites from this self-hate? She’s half-white at the least. There is no such thing as a light-skinned black. We didn’t come off the slave ships looking like Amandala. Get over it. If everyone’s mixed then would you have a problem is Amandala decided to identify as white? I hate it when people make convenient arguments like yours.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    are*

  • CAsweetface

    right? @TheBestAnonEver i feel like they are posting things to get a rise out of us lately and I refuse to take the bait like many people have after I posted my comment.

  • Sexy Mix

    @Sheely- Best post here, *STANDING O* !

  • Sexy Mix

    @Ohsnap- great post.

  • Yb

    Thank you. I do not know why the black community continues to deny that light skin blacks, and biracials are not seen as different or exceptional to others. The closer you are to white the more privileges you are rewarded. It’s as simple as that. If someone denies this then they must also deny the existent of white privilege, which is damn near impossible for a POC.

    We can shout “black is black” until are tongues fall out, but that doesn’t mean everyone will see black as just black.

  • Brian

    What this tell us is that race still matters. No matter what is said the group with the economic power still feels this way no matter how they try and deny it. We have to live it therefore we are sensitive to things that have to do with race. Where as they don’t but do to the fact they feel threatened by their loss of numbers to no whites any encroachment on territory once perceived to be theirs they respond while saying there is no more racism.

    Trust me this is a power play and we will be affected with less roles and less behind the scene roles. This is the one requirement to be a racist (the power to affect the group being prejudged), the bean counters are monitoring these social networks and will adjust the movies accordingly. See these pie in the sky blacks who are trying to lump the few blacks who care enough to mention they would have like a darker fersion of Rue as opposed to the whites basically saying they don’t want any blacks in meaningful roles outside of the stereotypical Gangster, pimp street walker, slave, servant are two completely different topics.

    Learn your history, We have been going backward since the civil rights era began. Do your home work! We are poorer in almost every way since then. We have been duped. Bamboozled!!!!

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    I agree YB. Everyone is calling her “black” because her black is the only type that exist to whites. The other type of black is too traumatic.

  • Brooklynista

    Her name is spelled AMANDLA. If you all are looking to hire a copy-editor, contact me ;)

    I had no real interest in seeing this film, but now I do. So yay to the racists for unwittingly giving the Hunger Games a PR boost.

  • willow

    Yeah, I’m still waiting on the snap back too… Glad she didn’t snap back…kudos to her people.

    I feel like Clutch has been doing the most to get readership. Not hating just making notes…

  • Bree

    Nope. She’s not even Jewish, her father is Danish and her mother is Black.

  • Whatever

    @ Leo

    EXACTLY. I tried to make this argument in a previous post… black is black!

    This is America and racism is alive and kicking. You can claim to be white, mixed, purple… whatever, your ass is still black. A black person will look at this girl and think “oh, maybe she’s mixed” a white person will not. When I saw her in Colombiana I just thought she was black.

    I was so sad for her when I read the blog that posted all the racist comments but in the words of Paul Mooney this was definitely a “nigga wake up call” moment.

  • Whatever

    @Ms. Information

    This is why Princess Tiana was a damn frog through out most of the movie… easier to swallow than watching an actual beautiful black character. Not even an animation can do the trick smh

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    @Whatever

    I disagree. Sleeping Beauty slept through most of her movie. Snow White was poisoned. Cinderella was a scullery maid. Beauty had to live with a big ass beast with an attitude problem. I’d rather be a frog.

  • apple

    Who is we? Unlike you, I support all types of blacks no matter how big or small ,I don’t have light skin/dark skin issues

  • Ms. Information

    @ Ohsnap ” Not too long ago it didn’t matter how light skinned a black person was…they weren’t allowed in the door.” From the time of slavery lighter skinned blacks were afforded more comforts than darker skinned blacks…that is where the system of this mess began……I am a movie buff…old black films only have women Lena Horne’s color and lighter….I am a Lena Horne fan and she experienced lots of racism but even she said that she was afforded a little more respect than her darker counterparts.

  • LemonNLime

    @Lola – “And don’t think the one drop rule will not help racial relations,but further divide the black community, just look at South America.”

    That makes no sense. There wasn’t a one drop rule policy implemented in Latin America. They had castas and names for category of people with mixed ancestry – mulatto, criollo, zambos, cholos, etc. If anything, it was more popular to be considered white or closer to white than black if you had white blood. Race and color issue in Latin America have NOTHING to do with the one drop rule, which was implemented in the US to ensure the offspring of raped black women would remain slaves and have no right to inheritance or freedom. Sounds like a wonderful thing to base our community off of!

    People have been talking this one drop rule foolishness for years. How has it made race relations better? If anything you have more dispute amongst blacks and mixed people.

    White people, asian, people, indian people DON’T make black people. 2 black parents make black people and it is insulting to black people as a whole to insist that anything other than black will make black. This has to be a phenomena in the black community because I never hear any of racial minorities talking this nonsense.

  • LemonNLime

    I haven’t read the book but with the description how do we know she wasn’t say, Indian or Southeast Asian in the book? There are plenty of Southern Asians that are just as dark if not darker than say your Gabrielle Unions or Angela Bassetts. Do they specifically give detail to suggest a dark black person of African descent or do they just say dark brown skin? All I’m saying is black people are not the only ones with dark brown skin.

  • http://promiscuouslola.com Cate Young (@promiscuouslola)

    Why does it matter that’s she’s light skinned? She’s still black, and that’s what the role called for. You’re dangerously close to shadeism territory.

  • QoNewC

    @The voice of Reason

    I completely understand where you are coming from and shame on these black women who are using these bi-racial women to improve the “brand” of black women. They want to hold onto these biracial women as black because they think it may improve their lot as black women. They know that these biracials are more acceptable to the mainstream.

  • Ebony82

    Good job, Amandla! Don’t pay attention to the haters. They are a non-issue.

  • Precious

    ^^^^

    Um, she’s BI-RACIAL! Stop claiming folks as black when she’s clearly mixed with white.

  • The Taker

    O____O. You chicks in here are freaking nuts. All the hate is really unnecessary. Amandla is a little damn girl. And from the looks of these posts and those disgusting tweets, I wouldn’t claim neither side. You don’t even know her to know what she claim, but you talking like you do. From what I’m reading here, it looks like both sides have equal hate for her. I swear, the internet makes me HATE what is supposedly called “Humanity”. She can’t help her skin color, nor her heritage. And she shouldn’t have to. Heard she was excellent in the movie and that’s all that matters. It’s makes me sick to read “grown” ass women attacking this little girl and take their insecurities and prejudices out on her. Get your ass off the internet and go see a freaking therapist or psychiatrist. If you so badly gotta see a brown-skinned girl be apart of a movie, show, video,etc… Take it up with the casting directors, producers, directors.. Not the casting star. Or better yet, make your own damn movie or t.v. show (yeah I took it there). But since none of you are not, can you kindly please STFU. Thanks.

  • QCastle

    @The Taker

    No on here is attacking her. In fact the conversation isnt even about her. Its about the idea that because “society” sees her as black and because she is receiving racist taunts because of her blackness that makes her black. Well, it doesnt. She is mix race and THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THAT. What is wrong is her having to choose sides because blacks accept her and whites reject her. She is neither, she is both and she should be proud of that.

    What I find disturbing is the number of black women who are using Amandla and every other biracial woman as the new face of black women because they feel like they will receive some of the residual effects their acceptability in the mainstream. Its cowardly on behalf of black women. Black women need to let America know that this is who we are, this is what we look like, this is what our hair looks like, this is what our skin looks like, this is what our booty looks like, this is what our nose looks like and if you dont like it you can drop dead. Stop trying to pass of these biracial women as black so white American can start liking “black” women.

  • Yb

    @qcastle Not one black woman on this thread is using Amandla or any other biracial women to represent African American women. Stop projecting you insecure hag.

    Society dictates what they identify as. I dont see you on the Alicia Keys article saying she shouldnt idenifty as black. Hmmm…..

    And what is this “brand” you speak of? Last time I checked white America controlled the images of POC, especially the image of your precious black males, the same group of males who will fight tooth and nail to have mixed women identify as black. You should tell black males to stop claiming Barack, and make it so there maybe be a Black male president but I doubt you will. It must be so pathetic being that predict full.

    Oh and FYI. You are not and never will be a black American woman. I don’t care if you are fresh of the boat or born here. Stop appropriating the struggles and history of AA’s as yours. We are not your people and you are not ours. Worry about the state of your own ethnic group in this country and black Americans will worry about ours.

  • The Taker

    Ummm, yes they are. I read these comments thoroughly. Fine they’re not attacking her, but making unnecessary off-handed comments from “she is a black girl”<<no she's a got damn purple alien from Pluto or I'm paraphrasing this one "funny how mixed people wanna claim black when it suits them, her ilk makes me infuriated"<<< even though Amandla never said anything her race or what she claim. Her ilk, really, who the f*ck says that about a 13 year-old child, have a damn seat. From what I'm comprehending, people got a problem with her heritage, her skin tone, her casting role, everything.

    "Stop trying to pass of these biracial women as black so white American can start liking “black” women." Are you saying that about me, because I aint never said no sh*t like that. I said I have a problem with people making off-handed remarks to and about a 13 year child. That was and is my issue because it wasn't even called for. And that sounds like a "Them" issue and not a "Us" issue. I can give not one f*ck if "white america" likes full-blooded(HA!) black women. I've never needed them to care or like anything about us, ESPECIALLY when time and time and time and again they have demonstrated absolute zero f*cks about us. See: The smear campaign against Trayvon Martin. They are trying to justify the murder against a young boy armed with Skittles and Ice-tea. One of those justifications: because he smoked some pot.

  • QCastle

    @The Taker

    Ok, a few of the comments are a bit insulting but most of them arent really talking about her but talking about this phenomena of mix raced women now replacing black women. Some agreeing with it and some, rightly, rejecting it. It doesnt matter how society sees her. The change has to start somewhere. We have more knowledge now, so we dont have an accuse to be ignorant.

    No need to cuss, it aint that serious.

  • Glazed’ Donut

    I could tell of the bat that this girl was not fully black. Come on who are we fooling no one, white people clearly know a full black from a half black that’s exactly why all the Help roles go straight to darker black women with no biracial woman in site.

  • QCastle

    Great point. Its a caste system in the casting.

  • dee

    “Think about films in the 30s, 40s,etc. that used Jewish girls to depict black women because of the texture of their hair!”

    I’m pretty sure you made that up. Can you name one such film?

  • raah

    @dee

    now why would I make that up? I could be offended but I’m just going to laugh it off

    last example I’ve seen…”Imitation of Life” 1959. Really made it hard to appreciate older films seeing how much more ignorant and ridiculous people were back then. And this movie was supposed to be about identifying as a black woman but they wouldn’t even allow a black woman to portray that character.

  • raah

    I also don’t think it’s fair for people who ignore the racial context and commend Amandla to criticize people who do bring up the context. I support her and in no way want to attack her. Bringing up what we all know does not have to dampen her performance.

    This issue is much more complex than race. Does it matter that bi-racial as opposed to simply light skin black girls are chosen for major movie roles more often than girls/women of darker skin tones? For me it doesn’t.

    But even beyond shade, there is the issue of art. Art on one hand gets a pass for not having to be PC, or constrained by other social expectations. If the film is art, should we accept it for whatever the creative minds (directors, actors) want it to be? I remember watching Viola Davis being interviewed about “The Help” where she complained that black people’s expectations (specifically being fed up with maid/mammie roles) “destroy the black artist.” For a woman as intelligent and mature as she is, how can you cover your ears and blind your eyes to the consequences playing that role would create or perpetuate for black people? “Open your eyes lady – it’s not all about you and your career” is my personal opinion…

    And of course there’s the complicated history of being black in America; because of where we’ve come from, we constantly assess our experiences by that prism, constantly look for signs of justice v. injustice, etc. I don’t think that recognizing that history is a sign of backwardness or some disorder. I am all for moving forward but doing so requires honesty about what is.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    Thank you. I also wanted to add that whites only see bi-racial people as black or non-black only when it’s convenient for them. Right now she’s conveniently black, but when they need to cast a role meant for a black girl they’ll cast Amandala. I am not here to peddle false, and convenient ideas of blackness. That is not a good look for our people or is it right period. A half is not a whole. Thinking within the one-drop mindset and acting like skin color does not matter will have repercussions down the road. My problem is that it’s not the Amandala’s of the world who are paying the price.

  • dee

    The movie you’re referring to, “Imitation of Life”, starred actress Susan Kohner. Susan Kohner’s father was Jewish, yes, but her mother was Mexican and not Jewish. So she wasn’t simply “Jewish”, she is half-Latina. Aside from that, the point of the film was that her character was light-skinned and could pass for white.

    Can you name an actual example? The question is as before.

  • raah

    LOL. Girl get a life. Being half Mexican does not mean Latina. Could be white Hispanic-straight-from-Spain for all we know which is besides the point. How about the child who played the younger version of the same character??? Done.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    @QCastle

    Thank you for calling it out.

  • miss september

    @glazed donut The comment that you knew off the bat
    she was biracial…..how so is that based on her skin color. You do realize that
    It is 100% blk people with the same complexion. IMO this young woman did a great
    Job in her role. Yes there isn’t enough roles for brown/darkskin women so.lets create
    Them or start holding these directors’,producers,and writers accountable.
    Put our money where our mouth is, instead of running out andsupporting these films
    Boycott them until they cast characters thru look like us in
    every huge.

  • miss september

    @glazed donut The comment that you knew off the bat
    she was biracial…..how so is that based on her skin color. You do realize that
    It is 100% blk people with the same complexion. IMO this young woman did a great
    Job in her role. Yes there isn’t enough roles for brown/darkskin women so.lets create
    Them or start holding these directors’,producers,and writers accountable.
    Put our money where our mouth is, instead of running out andsupporting these films
    Boycott them until they cast characters thru look like us in
    every hue.

  • miss september

    *that look

  • Kat

    If you think this child isn’t biracial or multiracial, you are seriously out of touch with what real black people look like. This is an epidemic and the sad result of white supremacy and the one drop rule.

  • O’Phylia

    REAL BLACK?
    Oh sug, get out. Just get out.

  • Glazed’ Donut

    I’m not talking about her complexion her facial features looks like she has something besides black in her. It’s like you can always tell a very fair skinned person and know they have some type of black blood in them by looking at their face. And obviously I was right because she is half jewish and I didn’t even have to see the film to know this.

  • CHE

    Whats wrong with the one drop rule?

    Are you all saying there are noone in your families lighter than this young lady?
    All of you going on about this LITTLE girl are truly foolish(voice of reason,Qon/eshowoman/demon, etc)…..every Black family I have ever known whether Black American or Caribbean has always had lite,in the middle,and darker people. I look at my family–My grandmother with two Black parents is lighter than Amandla and Halle berry etc. My grandmothers mother is darker than Amandla. My grandmothers 3 children-2 are darker than Amandla and 1 is as lite as my grandmother- and this is the same pattern in the whole family amd most everyone in the family has 2 Black parents. My grandmothers sisters and brothers also follow this pattern-lite, in the middle,and darker…all with the same TWO black parents. SO WHAT OR WHO IS FULL BLACK and why would Black Americans or Caribbeans with our histories have ANYTHING against this little girl?

    There have always been Black people like this…..So WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE ONE DROP RULE? This is actually one of the few things that we as Blacks can and should claim and embrace from our painful history, IMO(not claiming and reforming something like the n-word as some Blacks like to claim we have done). If the different shades of Black that are reflected in my family and most other Black families I have known-what is the argument, angst, and anger about(voice of reason etc).

    As for biracial people being the face of Black women only…..the BIGGEST and wealthiest and most FAMOUS BLACK supermodel ever- NAOMI CAMPBELL- is far from light and white people love her inspite of her issues; Not to mention Beverly Johnson,Alek Wek, Iman, etc and even Tyra Banks with her green eyes and TWO Black parents is not all that lite, IMO. Halle Berry is not all that lite to me either and she has a White parent. I have family members lighter than her with TWO Black parents; Janet Jackson was one of the biggest pop stars and she is far from lite; SO WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE ONE DROP RULE?

    I think with hiphop/c-rap and all you see are lite, brite and damn near white chics in the videos(take that issue up with the black men you all love so much), not to mention all these hispanics with Black ancestry and they claim not to be Black….its like Black people are all of a sudden confused and its like NOONE IS BLACK ANYMORE, and we are having stupid arguments about what is a true Black person and other foolishness. LLET IT GO AND EMBRACE THE ONE DROP RULE…with our history it would be foolish and political suicide not to.

  • miss september

    @Kat question what does “real blk people” look like. That is one of the
    Most ignorant statements I’ve heard in a long time .You must seriously be
    Out of touch if you think there isn’t black people with no multi-racial ancestry
    That look like her. Please dont use this article to project your hate.
    If you want to make an argument please come better than that.
    Just to enlighten you a little there is biracial people who are actually darker
    Than her. If I told you actress Claudia Jordan was biracial would you be so quick
    To say she isn’t a real blk person. If everyone felt like you did there would be
    Many people discounted as black based solely on their skin tone.
    Please broaden your mind on what it is to be black . Each experince is
    Individual no two experiences are the same just like the various hues that
    “Real Black People” come in…….

  • kaya

    @thevoicereason
    That may true but at least they had a privileged of being human for most part of their film, we can’t say that much.
    We also dont even have the privilege of having a black prince at the end of the day we got to be the group to “mix” to be seen as acceptable. Wash us out.

  • So Over This Ish

    @ Che…I disagree with you about the “one-drop rule” being a good thing, but I agree with your comment otherwise.

    There are quite a few people who aren’t biracial who are lighter than Amandla Stenberg.

  • So Over This Ish

    @ raah…She does have brown skin, it’s just a lighter shade of brown. And she may be mixed but being biracial/multiracial doesn’t stop people from experiencing discrimination.

    I speak from my own experiences.

  • So Over This Ish

    @ Yb…I see your point, but she has two of the characteristics mentioned in the book, “satiny brown skin” and “bright, dark eyes”. That can apply to a lot of mixed girls as well as girls with two Black parents.

    I’m not sure why people are complaining because although she is biracial, she is still viewed as a Black girl, hence all the racism on Twitter. I believe her mother is a Black woman. I’m not sure what the problem is. The racists on Twitter don’t care if she has a white parent because they see her as just another n*gger. I’m of mixed race too, I speak from experience.

    I’m with Apple…there seems to be a lot of division here and it’s sad. My skin is much lighter than hers but I don’t see myself as better than anyone. I feel that we should be happy for this young girl trying to achieve her dreams in the toxic world of Hollywood, despite all the racism that she has encountered and will continue to encounter.

  • angelface

    Starwars name for the win.

  • Si On Da

    Lightskin for the win!!!

  • Blanca

    DNA is DNA, folks. I’m tired of this nonsense that it is possible to be lighter than an OFFICIALLY biracial person but NOT mixed-race. If you don’t look black then you AREN’T black, no matter what your parents called themselves.

  • greyeyedgirl

    If you don’t look black then you are not black? You have to be extremely ignorant to utter such foolishness.

  • MissAnn

    ^^^^^^

    Been like that for quite some time.

  • So Ironic

    I always laughed at the one drop rule. White supremacists and some black folk don’t see the the irony in this. Now you (white folk) are supposed to be superior to other darker ethnicities. However, one drop of black blood makes you black. So that means to me at least, that you(white folk) are easily racially obliterated. Why doesn’t one drop of white blood make you white? The one drop rule is utterly baseless and ridiculous.

  • CHE

    @So Over This:

    Exactly- there are people with two Black parents who are lighter than Amandla….. That is my point……In one family you can have lite and dark siblings from the same two Black parents….there are so many variations that could happen….thats why I embrace the one drop rule because that is what I see all in my family and ever other Black family I have known; SO WHAT IS SO WRONG WITH THE ONE DROP RULE?.

  • So Over This Ish

    Both of you are somewhat right, as crazy as it seems.

    A very light-skinned person can have two “Black” parents, but chances are that the light skin is a result of admixture somewhere down the line…whether it was from a grandparent or great-grandparent. The person might not be biracial in the way that most people think about it, but they are still of mixed race. But they would generally identify with being Black only in most cases.

    @ greyeyedgirl…race is a very complicated subject in America, as we all know. I kind of see what Blanca is saying. Sometimes it depends on where a person comes from, too. I’ve read that Brazil and Latin America has a racial stratification based on skin color, so a very light-skinned person can be classified as white, even with Black ancestry.

    Some people don’t see me as Black at all based on my appearance, while others can tell that I’m a person of color. The whole concept of race is just really weird sometimes.

  • JaeBee

    “Do they specifically give detail to suggest a dark black person of African descent or do they just say dark brown skin? All I’m saying is black people are not the only ones with dark brown skin.”

    The author, Suzanne Collins, confirmed that Rue was African American in the following interview: http://insidemovies.ew.com/2011/04/07/hunger-games-suzanne-collins-gary-ross-exclusive/

    In addition, in the book, she eludes to the fact that Rue comes from a district that treats its citizens like slaves, and has also stated that District 11 is located in what we now know as the “Deep South”.

  • losing weight

    I BW and I say we SHOULD go back to the one drop rule and test everyone for black blood. I BET we would not be having this talk at all and a lot of whites would be crying the blues. She is light skin due to slave masters sneaking out at night to the slave quarters. the white women knew and gave their consent, so they did not have to be bothered.

    For people who first came to the united states from England as prisoners (thieves, robbers, murders, child molesters uncouth of society) people sure are judgmental.

    If you dont believe me look up the history of the united state oh I forgot you guys changed the history books so most people would not know that…force feeding out children and yours crap as “history”.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    Let me just interject that Amandla’s father is DANISH!

    1.) Experiencing discrimination does not make you “black”.

    2.) No matter how much you label yourself black. It’s a matter of racial mixture not personal choice.

    3.) Not all “black” is created equal. We are not all treated the same.

    4.) You can’t imply that we are all mixed and yet deny that certain mixes are treated better than others. You DO NOT want to open up that can of worms.

    5.) I don’t think that any women and men on here harbor any ill will towards Amandla.

    6.) It is the fact that we keep mis-labeling people like Amandla despite all the evidence we have to support that Mixed Race People are their own group with their own experiences, and that’s ok.

    7.) Allowing anyone to call themselves “black” makes light of our suffrage. Blackness is not something to be randomly claimed when your people don’t like you.

    8.) Mixed-race people’s acceptance in this world is not the responsibility of blacks, but whites who created this problem.

    9.) Amandla has white family members too and they count just as much. Don’t conveniently erase her white side.

  • So Over This Ish

    But Amandla is not a lighter shade of brown due to anyone “sneaking out to the slave quarters”…she is the product of an interracial marriage between a White man and a Black woman.

    Not all light skin results from rape.

  • Best Guest

    to girlformerly….. maybe I missed something, but in the posts I read before you posted, no one blamed that child for anything?

    Who blamed her? and blamed her for what?

  • Shay

    ^^^^^THIS!!^^^^^^

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    Why thank you. This also applies to Nicole Ritchie’s case too.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    This ^^^^^^^^

    I would like to add that those extra comforts allowed them to get further ahead of darker skinned blacks.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    @LemonNLime

    *High Five*

  • Okay

    If your black get back. If your brown stick around. If your white your alright. I think that is what many people see here and what they are commenting on. This was something our grandparents were saying and the film industry proves that time and again.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    @Kaya

    I could care less if the prince wasn’t black. I am all for interracial marriage. You don’t see black men picking black women to play besides them in major films. Even when they do pick black women they are rarely Tiana’s color. Like I said I’d rather be a frog than the girl that got poisoned.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    @Whatever

    You mean to tell me that you have such a low sense of self-worth that you value the opinions of whites above reality. The reality is that she is a part of both sides, and that calling her black is LYING.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    @Kaya

    I could care less if the prince wasn’t black. I am all for interracial marriage. It’s the fact that we erase the white parent who have loved and cared for their child. We really need to stop riding on the coattails of mixed-race people. It’s not a good look. By the way you don’t see black men picking black women to play besides them in major films. Even when they do pick black women they are rarely Tiana’s color. So this whole “black love” crap needs to DIE. Like NOW. Like I said I’d rather be a frog than the girl that got poisoned.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    ^^^^^ This. Her father is Danish, but according to you idiots he doesn’t count.

  • peaches

    and the ignorance continues.. who gives 2 fks if the girl is mixed or not.. ppl are just to involved.. are there even any pure black ppl in the world today.. majority of us are all mixed w/another race.. unless you’ve met your ancestors that were slaves and their children you don’t know.. Africans had dark skin right? so why do you think so many of us are light ?! could it be because back then the whites were raping their slaves?! i’m sure there were some consenting ones, but i’m not light because both of my parents are completely black.. from what i heard, my paternal grandmother was white.. my father is light and i look like a black person but i’m a light one..

  • peaches

    Her mother is African-American and her father is Danish.

  • Cia

    I had to respond to your rather silly comment “I’m tired of this nonsense that it is possible to be lighter than an OFFICIALLY biracial person but NOT mixed-race. If you don’t look black then you AREN’T black, no matter what your parents called themselves”

    I have black parents, grandparents (on both sides), great grandparents, etc. and I have basically white skin, very long wavy hair and blue eyes—no one would EVER mistake me as anything but black though. As do many others in my family, I have a sister who is much darker…why can’t our race just have a beautiful range? Why must some be excluded based on the randomness of genetics. No one is a “real” black person as I have seen some other commenters state. This all can be very upsetting and unfair.

  • Robbie

    OMG, I cannot believe what some of you are saying. As a French woman I do hear a lot about France this, France that and France is racist and France is bad. There is too many issues in the AA communities regarding color.

    That is why I cannot bother with some of you. Can that lil girl enjoy being part of a successful movie without people questioning her blackness or whiteness? She is mixed we get that so what? Why can’t she claimed both or one of the other. Both of my parents are black but my mom is from mix heritage.

    Despite that, I am a brown girl and consider myself black and nothing else even thought I can claim white heritage. My sisters are whiter than this young lady with blonde hair ( naturally not hair dyed) with green and light brown eyes. Me on the other hand, my hair came out orange which I hated. We claim being black women and nothing else why can’t we accept the fact that blacks comes in every shades of black.

  • http://fuckyeahdarkgirls.tumblr.com TheVoiceOfReason

    You just said you were mixed, but now you’re black? Being black isn’t a personal choice and it does not come in all shades. Deal with it. Mislabeling is not helping blacks at all. It has gotten us nowhere.

  • CHE

    You are totally right Robbie and I embrace all Black people…Black as midnight, caramel, to lite, bright, damn near White-all the colors in my family and most other Black families.
    The one drop rule is something I claim, celebrate, and embrace proudly.

    @thevoiceofreason: youre really pressed about this issue and I wonder who made you queen or king of the Blacks with the power to decide whos in the race and the power to decide that Black doesnt come in all colors….its too late to go back boo boo…that ship has sailed-deal with it or seek therapy. You sound crazy.

  • CHE

    Colors=shades of Black.

  • Truth from Finland

    I just had to comment this.

    So called “black people” in US just dont know what average Africans look like. To me as an European it is totally clear that she is multiracial. Reason is that practicallty all people here are Europeans, Africans or biracials.

    African-Americans are almost 20% European on average. Average West-Africans dont look like you. Understand this. Some African-Americans keep saying “We come in all colors”. Its true. You know why you come in all colors? Its because you are mixture of black and white.

  • Renea

    I’m sorry, but I had to interject:

    So because she’s half Danish… you won’t defend her when racists who only SEE Black down her?

    Let’s all think about this: if the majority of all commenters on this site didn’t bother to google this young woman’s name in order to find out more about her lineage, do you really think the “twitter racists” did also?

    Oh, and since she’s “not REAL Black”, is President Obama not either? How’s about Tiger Woods? Vanessa Williams? Alicia Keys? Bob Marley?

    You can’t have it both ways. The comments on Twitter should not have been made. She handled them with more grace and maturity than most young women her age would have. As far as I’m concerned, that’s all that matters.

  • Elyse

    Personally besides Cinna, Effie, Haymitch, Gale, and Prim. Rue is one of the characters that I think they got perfect!

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