Nearly a year after the Arab Spring swept through Egypt, women in the country are fighting against radical laws proposed by the government’s Islamic-led parliament. According to Al Arabiya News, the new laws would lower the minimum that a young girl can consent to marriage to 14, and would allow a man to have sex with his wife’s body up to six hours after her death.

Other laws being considered would also reverse the rights of women in the country to pursue an education and earn a living.

Al Arabiya reports:

According to Egyptian columnist Amro Abdul Samea in al-Ahram, Talawi’s message included an appeal to parliament to avoid the controversial legislations that rid women of their rights of getting education and employment, under alleged religious interpretations.

“Talawi tried to underline in her message that marginalizing and undermining the status of women in future development plans would undoubtedly negatively affect the country’s human development, simply because women represent half the population,” Abdul Samea said in his article.

The controversy about a husband having sex with his dead wife came about after a Moroccan cleric spoke about the issue in May 2011.

Under the reign of former dictator Hosni Mubarak women enjoyed several advancements of rights, particularly because of First Lady Suzanne Mubarak who wanted all Egyptian women to enjoy the same rights she was afforded. But with last year’s overthrow of the government, many women are feeling uneasy about the direction of the country and what it means for them.

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42 Comments

  1. CurlySue

    I am speechless here. Less at the lowered age for consent, which is distasteful in and of itself, but more at the necrophilia. Laws typically don’t get passed unless there’s a real push for them from a significant or powerful population. So, are you telling me that there’s a significant contingent of Egyption men who are insisting on the right to f*ck a corpse? Is that what we’re saying here? Ugh, I need a nap.

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  2. Ms. Information

    And we think we have issues over here…geesh..

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  3. and would allow a man to have sex with his wife’s body up to six hours after her death.

    WTH???

    This has got to be one of those things that got lost in translation. I don’t want to believe this is a proposed law.

    The women who protested to overthrow Hosni Mubarak should be having second thoughts now.

    Stuff like this is the reason why I will always call myself a bit of a feminist. Men will always look out for themselves first. They will even join together to keep a woman down or to protect one another.

    The controversy about a husband having sex with his dead wife came about after a Moroccan cleric spoke about the issue in May 2011.

    aka the holy freak!

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  4. Here I am waging war against FGM, then this fuggers come out with what kind of laws! I swear women are oppressed and unappreciated in Africa! That’s why we swim the great Atlantic.

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    • Dalili

      Hola Mami! :-)

      Giirrrlll, and yet we rise!

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    • hey sis!!

      We do rise mama, but I feel dejected. When we seem as if we are progressing we take 10 steps back. What gives?!

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    • Dalili

      I know you do and understandably so, the condition of women on the continent can leave one depressed. But, what to do? The very thing these Egyptian women are doing; fight, push back, protest until we are heard. There was a time not so long ago that this protest wouldn’t have taken place, but it is now….because someone did their small part.

      So take heart, you are cut from the same cloth as some of Africa’s strongest daughters: Wangari Maathai, (Insert your mum’s name here :-) ), Mrs. Johnson Sirleaf, Tawakkol Karman, Leymah Gbowee, Miriam Makeba, Graca Machel and countless others not named. Do what you can, where you are……you are not alone.

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    • awwwww, just like a sister is supposed to do, offer support! and kind words of encouragement!! ‘Preciate it!!!

      Wangari Maathai is my HEROINE!!!!:) Have a good night mama!!!!!!!

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