What you miss when you get lost in the debate about our own problems with the crime right, you forget the fact that Derbyshire’s post isn’t about you or saving you from becoming a statistic. He didn’t even write it for black people. He most certainly didn’t write it to help anyone. Not even the so called children you’re supposed to address this too. It’s about reinforcing a social order that has existed in our society since there was one – that some people deserve bad things to happen to them because they are different and therefore wrong.

This argument pretty much ignores things like “facts,” social conditioning and years of disenfranchisement. Even Derbyshires absurd point of “five percent” of blacks being the problem turns his whole column into overkill as that figure infers 95 percent of black people are fine.

And if 95 percent of people are okaley dokaley what do you need this “talk” for?

It’s important to remember that when some people shout, “What about the black-on-black crime rate” in the Trayvon Martin killing to pay attention to the source. Quite often these are individuals who don’t care about the black-on-black crime rate. They just want to obscure you from the actual facts of the case – that Trayvon would be alive and Zimmerman wouldn’t be in hiding if Zimmerman had made the choice to stay in his car, as advised by the 911 operator.

That’s it. There’s nothing left to discuss. That’s even without the troubling racial components in the case. Zimmerman stays in the car and Martin goes home to watch the rest of All Star Game and that night would have been just another boring night in the suburbs of Sanford, Fla.

The black-on-black crime rate is a serious problem with a myriad of complex issues surrounding it. Its cause is rooted in what happens to a group of people who have gone through the systematic destruction of self and have had to rebuild in a war zone. Other problems are simply an issue of poverty, education and class, which afflicts us all, no matter our race, but are solvable problems – if people and our government were actually dedicated to the hard work necessary to solve them rather than mandatory prison sentences and handing out band-aids.

The key with someone like Derbyshire is intent.

What was Derbyshire’s true intent in writing this? Is he truly concerned about black-on-white violence when statistically white people have more to fear from another white person than a black person as crime tends to be pretty segregated? (Blacks tend to kill other blacks. Whites tend to kill other whites.) Or is this just the typical garbage that has existed since slavery when seeing a group of blacks conversing was deemed a threat as they could potentially be planning a slave revolt?

Because what is Derbyshire afraid of? He, like most racists, never gets at what is implied as the reason why he believes or fears violence from African Americans. Where-oh-where would such a vile and irrational hate come from?

Subconsciously, they know that historically and even today, many black Americans have to deal with the burden of being black in a racially charged society. When Derbyshire complains about racism, it’s about wanting to be free from judgment or accountability for the inherent unfairness in our system. When a black person complains about racism it usually involves a dead child and a police department disinterested in investigating because it’s implicit that your child’s life is worth less than someone else’s. And someone on the less “dead kid” end of America’s racism knows that if they were suddenly stripped of their privilege and judged solely for their skin color they would likely want to raze entire cities.

After all, historically black people have had that happen to them for just minor infractions like “looking at a white woman” and “existing.”

  • cameshaj

    normality is relative. So therefore a normal black person can not be defined because it is always relative to individual definitions, situations, and perceptions.

  • http://www.pyramidoftruth.com Nebankh

    “Subconsciously, they know that historically and even today, many black Americans have to deal with the burden of being black”.

    Being Black is a blessing and far from a burden.

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