I love writing about dating, personal development, and getting into Ivy League schools, and I often wish that the things I write about were more “hot” right now. Yes, people are always talking about love and relationships. And there will always be people eager to get into impressive schools. But dating and personal development, while popular subjects of interest with millennials, aren’t the hottest thing. You know what is hot right now? NATURAL HAIR! It’s a shame that I don’t care enough to write more about it or to strike out on my own as a Youtuber. I bet I’d have my own mini-empire by now.

I’ve had natural hair since 2003, when I realized that I could feed a small village with the amount of money I was spending on straightening my hair. No longer near my relaxer-wielding mom, I was finally realizing just how expensive it is to maintain the illusion that my hair grows out of my head straight. To make matters worse, my hair never quite looked the way I wanted it to. I wanted my long, straightened hair to look exactly like Aaliyah’s. It never came close. So I did the big chop in 2003, and spent three months getting mistaken for my male colleague as I taught middle school.

Despite having natural hair for the last nine years, and donning “neat” locs that cascade past my shoulders, I just don’t care that much about the natural hair revolution. I’m happy that women are embracing the natural way that their hair grows and learning how to do all kinds of sexy and creative hairstyles. There is a veritable pantheon of natural hair bloggers and YouTubers who can teach you how to do any hairstyle or treatment you can think of at home. In fact, last week, I sat down with a Chescalocs tutorial and gave myself sexy spiral curls using pipe cleaners. However, if it was up to me, I would have gone to a salon and paid a natural hair passionista to wash, retwist, and curl my hair for me.

One consequence of the natural hair revolution that I hope comes to pass is that more hair stylists in mid-sized cities will begin doing natural hair. I live in Austin, Texas where women are still largely afraid of their hair in its natural state, and I have no idea what to tell inquisitive newcomers to the city when they stop me and ask where they can get their natural hair styled. Even though I’d rather not, I wash and twist my hair myself at home while catching up on episodes of Shameless or Real Housewives of New Jersey.

I don’t think the natural hair revolution is anywhere near over. I think that the Youtube stars will continue in their (much deserved) rise to natural hair fame, and more and more women will big chop and begin discovering the myriad of ways they can wear their hair. In the meantime, disengaged naturals like me who are happy for them but just don’t care enough to become natural hair experts will continue to watch from the sidelines, eagerly waiting for one of our natural-hair-loving sisters to open up a salon within walking distance.

 

  • chastize

    I cut off my natural hair and sported my afro when was a teen. One day I looked in the mirror after an afternoon of riding my ten speed and saw that dozens of tiny little green
    bugs were stuck in my fro. The rest of the story is just pure vanity.
    Lesson learned? Keep your hair covered if you are zooming aroung on a bike!!!
    All is vanity.

  • http://www.RealTalk123.com AlesiaMichelle

    People b!tch “I am not my hair…” but talk about their hair ALL THE TIME… I’m over the facebook play by play updates on Black women’s hair… wgaf

    It is just hair

  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

    It sure is a revolution that has revealed to me that there is more than one Oprah. Like chicks be preaching!!! and getting all humbra humbra, Aubrey Graham like about hair follicles. Lawwwwwd hammmmercy, it wasn’t like dat when I first went back to my normal state of hair! Oh well…..oh yeah, shout out to the revolution for having spurred entrepreneurship and in effect employment opportunities for my sistas!

    STAY STRONG MA SISTAS, STAY STRONG

    * does a black power fist, looks upwards to the heavens-getting my deep on*

  • Syd

    Thank you, Thank you and thanks. Methink that the author does protest too much. Its okay not to care, but to write about it is a bit much. From reading the article I figured that the author must be feeling left out because she’s been natural for sooooo long and just needed some acknowledgement.

  • RENEE

    I wore cornrows for about 7 years. I am now wearing 2 strand twist to give my hair a break from the braids. I am real new to the ‘natural revolution’ and am enjoying learning about all the new styles and products. I don’t do my own hair ( too lazy) and always go to a stylist. Some are good, some only so-so. Despite that I do enjoy the styles I see on other sistas with natural hair and I really enjoy the videos on U-tube. It sounds like the author would feel differently if she had access to a good stylist to do her hair. That would no doubt take the pressure off as it can take some time to shampoo, condition twist ( or braid etc ) alot of natural styles. My friend is natural and she lives in San Antonio down the road from Austin. She goes to a good natural hair stylist. Maybe she should look up one in that area.

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