After heading to a popular South Miami nightclub for a birthday celebration, a group of black women waiting on line to get in were met with a harsh wake-up call: They wouldn’t be partying in the club that night because they were black.

According to NBC Miami, Liz Lopez, Nancy Pierrot, Katuschca Jubuisson and Kat Bing say they were turned away from the Arkadia nightclub inside the popular Fontainebleau Miami Beach hotel for no other reason than the color of their skin.

“Oh, I definitely know I didn’t get in because I am an African-American,” Jubuisson said. “It really sickens me because of the fact that I have given plenty of money to the Fountainebleau.”

Jubuisson says the club’s bouncer told the women they weren’t getting in—despite waiting in line—because they were black. In disbelief, the women continued to wait and observed other women being allowed into the club (they’d been inside before), but were again turned away.

“I stood out there for at least forty-five minutes. I saw all these other white girls, you know, getting in and I still waited. The gentleman at the front door behind the velvet rope didn’t even acknowledge us,” Kat Bing said. “One of the security guards saw us and kind of felt bad and approached me. He said you know what he’s not going to let you guys in because you’re black, you know that.”

The women say they were invited by one of the club’s promoters, Rodrick Dudley,  and were shocked when he flatly explained that the Fountainebleau only allows black women who look “twice as good” as white women.

“This is south beach a shallow self serving superficial place. They pay me 300 a night to bring attractive women to their establishment and or cats who spend dough. I know what it is going in,” he explained via text. “I’ve always been kind and accommodating to you and you’ve never shown me any appreciation which is fine. I don’t need it this is what I do because I like you I tried to cordially give you a heads up warning cause the only reason they let your girls in last time was because I fought to get em in. Its a double standard @ the fountainbleu. White chics can be ok. Black chics gotta look twice as good and they only cater to a so called urban crowd on thursdays and sundays. Peace and love.”

The women have filed a federal discrimination lawsuit against the Fountainebleau Hotel, but the club and hotel issued a statement saying it appreciates and embraces diversity.

“Fontainebleau Miami Beach is a hotel that embraces diversity and truly cares about its guests and Team Members. To nurture diversity on our property, we offer diversity trainings; embrace talent acquisition programs that bring Team Members to us from all areas of the world, and host events to celebrate diversity,” the statement said. “We are an Equal Opportunity establishment that has been, and will continue to be, dedicated to this fundamental principle.”

“What has been claimed in this investigation is not acceptable, will not be tolerated and should not have happened on our property,” the statement said.

The Fountainebleau claims Dudley is not affiliated with the hotel or the nightclub, and has barred him from the property.

The hotel invited the ladies back to the club to “experience the true level of hospitality that they deserve,” but the group has declined. The ladies say they don’t want anyone else to be discriminated against and are continuing with their lawsuit.

Have you ever faced discrimination at a nightclub? 

138 Comments

  1. Clubs have been doing this for decades, no one has been stupid enough to say it or text it though.

  2. NYC clubs are like this as well.

  3. [email protected]

    Dear Clutch Magazine,

    Thanks for finally making me realize it’s time to no longer support you. As you now seem to make bad news about Black women your primary means of getting visitor clicks, as you happily parrot all the propaganda from the mainstream media, I will no longer support this junk version of an online magazine.

    I bid you Adieu!

    AJ

    • Thank you for the note. We are sorry that reporting the news and other issues affecting black women is seen as “negative.” We work hard to make sure Clutch is a diverse space, offering differing perspectives on various issues. But we do not live in a bubble. We will not walk (or write) on egg shells simply because some readers may be offended. We do not purposely incite arguments and hope that each of our articles sparks constructive dialoge that empowers/informs our communities.

      Thank you for visiting and supporting while you did. We hope that you reconsider your decision to stop reading. However, we do not agree that we only post negative things that tear down Black women – when those of us contributing to Clutch are ALL black women.

      We are an online news and opinion site – and we will continue to report news and highlight issues that may be of interest to our readers.

    • Maggie

      Well said Clutch! Keep up the good work! Without some of your articles, I would be completely clueless that these issues/incidents are even happening. I am outside of the US and am grateful for the articles that you choose to post in this mag. Thank you.

    • michele

      i think it all just got to her…

  4. this reminds me of a scene in knocked up.

    “I’m only allowed to let in five percent black people. He said that, that means if there’s 25 people here I get to let in one and a quarter black people. So I gotta hope there’s a black midget in the crowd.”

  5. Yea, it’s pretty much a given in NYC that in order to get into some clubs you’ve got to look like a model and dressed in your finest “red bottoms”.

    • I like that they’ve brought media attention to this. This way we know to stay the heck away from this club. Don’t give people money to disrespect you.

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