When I first heard of Snoop Dogg’s transformation from gangster rapper to Snoop Lion, a reggae artist, I was predictably skeptical. The man who spent the last 20 years C-walking with his blue rag and fresh press and curl was now singing about Jah and Rastafarianism, and like many, I felt it was a gimmick.

For the last 10 years Snoop has been open to experimenting, he’s dabbled in singing, and he’s even made records with teeny-bop stars, so when I heard “La La La,” Snoop Lion’s introduction into the world of reggae, I wrote it off as just another way to make money.

But then I saw the trailer for the documentary “Reincarnated,” which chronicles Snoop Dogg’s transformation to Snoop Lion and I began to wonder if he was for real.

During a press conference for the film, Snoop said something that really struck me.

“On this particular project right here I had no planning on going to Jamaica, making a reggae record or nothing. It’s just the spirit called me. And anytime the spirit calls you, you gotta know that it’s serious and real.”

I believe in second acts and I believe that people — at any time — can completely change the direction of their lives (peace to Malcolm X), so who am I to question Snoop’s transformation?

But what do you think, Clutchettes and Gents? Can people really reinvent themselves? And will others take them seriously?

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  • Amber

    Neither Rastafari nor reggae is just for Jamaicans. Of course Jamaica is the birthplace of both, but I don’t think you can place ownership on spirituality or music. If his transformation is sincere, which I think it is, being Jamaican clearly isn’t a requirement. I’m definitely not saying that he’ll make any type of decent reggae artist. That’s a whole different story, but I think it’s fair to give him a try.

    • Amber

      @YB