An Open Letter to Abigail Fisher

by Evette Dionne

Abigail Fisher

I am perplexed by the Fisher vs. The University of Texas case that is being addressed in the Supreme Court. Call me pessimistic, but with the Rockefeller Laws leading to mass incarceration of African-Americans and the corrosive use of New York City’s Stop and Frisk laws, I would think the most prestigious court in our nation would be more concerned with the welfare of minority men that are being prejudicially targeted than Abigail Fisher’s academic woes. But seeing as the nine justices thought that affirmative action needed a prompt revisit, I am addressing my grievances directly to the cause.

Dear Abigail Fisher,

Here is an apt forewarning: I am using this platform as a vehicle to communicate disbelief and subliminal rage. So, this open letter will not be imbued with false pleasantries intended to appease or uplift. Don’t expect an epistle steeped with ersatz compliments; it is not being written from a positive space of peace, light or love.

I am penning this missive because the vitriol coursing through my veins is inescapable. Rather than continuing to engage in unproductive Twitter rants, I am redirecting that caustic energy and utilizing this space instead.

Let me begin with this direct concern: If your injudicious mission is successful, there will be dire ramifications for blacks seeking acceptance in academia. Your decision to fight this battle to the Supreme Court can potentially annihilate affirmative action, a mandate that has required federally funded institutions to promote inclusive diversity.

If affirmative action is gutted and substituted with “neutral-based admissions,” institutions will have the option to deny students access to the educational American Dream based on their ethnic background. Abigail, if the Supreme Court issues a verdict in your favor, you will be responsible for pushing this nation backward, into an era when blacks were met with venom at the steps of Ole Miss.

Now, I’m a firm believer in equal application of the Constitution. You are entitled to petition the courts just as the Lovings did in the 1960s and I would never refute that unalienable right. The actual decision to pursue this case doesn’t plague me as much as the motive does.

You are insisting that the University of Texas at Austin denied your application for undergraduate admission because they were required to fulfill a federal diversity quota, which subjected you to bias. In blaming affirmative action for that denial letter, you are disregarding your responsibility as a college applicant. It is much easier to fault affirmative action than to hold up a mirror and see that you just weren’t qualified.

You told The New York Times that attending UT had been your dream since the second grade, so before submitting an application, you had to be aware of the admissions requirements. You knew that the institution automatically accepts the top 10 percentile from every high school in Texas and that the average SAT score is in the 1200s. It is common knowledge that UT is one of the most prestigious institutions in the United States, so it is challenging to be gain admission.

Before securing those letters of recommendation and forking over that expensive application fee, you knew that despite your legacy as the child of UT graduates, a spot on the coveted honor roll and a lifelong affair with the cello that admission wasn’t guaranteed.

In blaming affirmative action for that denial letter, you have failed to mention that you graduated number 82 in a class of 674 with a 3.59 grade point average on a 4.0 scale, which alienated you from the automatic admissions bunch. You conveniently omit that you scored an 1180 on your SAT, which is way below UT’s average, so that automatically diminished your chances of being accepted.

You suffer from selective amnesia, Abigail. You are aware that the University of Texas at Austin uses two indexes, the Academic and the Personal Achievement, to determine admission for students. You know that the Academic Index combines grades and standardized test scores while the Personal Achievement Index considers the submitted essays along with extracurricular activities and special circumstance (which can include race). You have been told that these two scores are combined and plotted on a graph and that everyone above a certain combined score is admitted while everyone below is rejected.

You also know that you fell below that line, along with more than 100 students who were denied admission. You’ve also read this statement from Gregory Garre, the University of Texas at Austin’s attorney:

“Even if Abigail Fisher had received a perfect Personal Achievement Index score she would not have been admitted … because her Academic Index was simply not high enough. Fisher would not have been admitted, no matter what her race.”

This leads to one conclusion: Affirmative action is not the issue. Now, before you attempt to bash me as another black woman benefiting from federal mandates, let me clarify: I scored a 1680 on the SAT and I was accepted into every undergraduate institution that I applied to. I graduated from Bennett College Summa Cum Laude and valedictorian with a 4.0 grade point average and I’m on a full ride merit-based fellowship for graduate school.

From academic to academic, it’s time to wake up and smell the ashes Abigail. You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.  You were not qualified. But of course because African-Americans students were chosen for admittance and you were not, it must be reverse racism in the form of affirmative action.

I’ve seen this time and time again. It is owed to the prevalence of white privilege, which leads to unwarranted entitlement. You do know what white privilege is, right?

It is a singular component of critical race theory that implies that whites view their social, economic, and cultural experiences as normative and universal rather than exclusive. White privilege was first addressed in W.E.B. DuBois’ 1935 classic, Black Reconstruction. You should indulge in it sometime.

You might not be aware of white privilege because it isn’t analyzed in grade school, but it appears subliminally in westernized culture. The errant thought that the University of Texas at Austin is obligated to grant you admission because you were underqualified, white and the spawn of alum is a manifestation of privilege. Unfortunately, that wasn’t an infallible plan.

I know this might be a difficult concept to grasp, but the African-Americans admitted into UT were simply more qualified and scored higher on the indexes. Your average GPA and SAT scores were enough to earn admission into Louisiana State University, but at UT, it wasn’t sufficient.

That is the lesson, Abigail. Whether or not the Supreme Court rules in your favor, you should still learn to check that privilege at the front door. Otherwise there will be further disappointments in the future … and it can’t always be blamed on affirmative action.

Your white skin is not an entitlement pass. Mediocrity wasn’t adequate at the University of Texas at Austin and it is not acceptable in life.

Sincerely,

A Despiser of White Privilege

  • i.mean.really

    Spot on! I’m so sick of whites (usually women, major beneficiaries of hiring and admittance quotas) crying foul when they don’t get what they want. If her grades and test scores were up to par she wouldn’t be wasting the court’s time.

    People need to understand that the point system only allows for like a point or two on the admission scale. It’s not like a minority with a 2.0 is going to get in simply because they are black or brown. There are plenty of brown and black children who are going to be going to their backup schools because they didn’t get into UT.

  • http://stimulationstatus.wordpress.com Stimulation_Status

    *snap* *snap* this article is the TRUTH! Abigail Fisher should definitely read this. It frustrates me how people do not get accepted into their “dream school” and blame affirmative action. blame yourself first because maybe you weren’t qualified enough. Hopefully the SCOTUS just glance at this and move on to the next issue that actually needs to be dealt with.

  • ?!?

    Yes. I wonder why people only talk about race and Affirmative Action. I guess they don’t want to consider that their mothers, daughters, sisters, and wives might have gotten a job after not being better than some man but because their gender came into play. I’m supposed to think that those women on Fox News showing their cleavage were more qualified than every man that applied, but Glen Ifill must have gotten Affirmative Action to get where she is today.

  • Blqdymd

    Preach!

    Poor Abby had her feeling hurt because someone finally told her she wasn’t good enough. Suck it up boo boo and put on your big girl panties. As a black woman, I’ve been wearing mine since age 5 and am sure to keep an extra pair around just in case I have to swallow an extra dose if white privilege in any given day.

  • P.

    Extremely interesting piece… Issues such as these must be clearly and accurately parsed so as to reveal the true motives of people who feel ‘victimized’….

  • Ms. Information

    Excellent article….there is really nothing more to say…

  • Kacey

    Great post. This should be placed where the “larger public” (read: Whites, and everyone else who think black people just get and deserved free ride) can read it.

  • News junkie

    And this is why I love Bennett Alum !

  • beautiful mic

    They should make Abigail take an DNA test; she got some black in her somewhere.

  • Smilez_920

    This is what happens when a) kids don’t know history b) when kids aren’t taught that they will not always get their way. In life you don’t always get what you want. Sometimes you get something better and sometimes you get nothing at all.

    A) If this girl is so darn smart and qualified , she would know that the women’s movement and the social rights movement mirrored each other on certain platforms. White women have been one a the major beneficiaries of afrimitive action. People fail to mention that on applications ( college and jobs) that they just don’t mention race but also sex for that reason.

    B) how can she just assume that afrimitive action ( which she unknowingly is a beneficiary of ) is the reason she wasn’t chosen. How does she know another white women with red hair had the same or better GPA didn’t get chosen over her. Heck maybe a white man was chosen over her. Schools choose students by a number of qualifications. The person who was choose over her could have been smarter. more well rounded, was a legacy of the school. Heck maybe their GPA wasn’t as high as yours but they wrote a great college application essay. Or maybe they did pick a black person over you, and if they did “SO THE FU)K WHAT” . Maybe that black person was smarter than you, more well rounded , was admitted into the school because of the major the choose .

    These kids today think because they work hard that , that automatically means you should get everything you want. Sorry that’s not how life works. I hope she reads this comment . Idk how it will get to her but I hope it gets to her. As a 22 yr old college grad trust I went through the ins and outs of the college application process . Sometimes you get into your dream school and sometimes you don’t .

    This is what happens when a ppl become the poster child /scapegoat for afrimitive action . If your not a White male , there’s a chance that you might have been helped by Affrmative action. Also we need to rid this myth that people have that afrimitive action is getting unqualified black ppl jobs . Heck if anything afrimitive action doesn’t get us anything , it helps us get our foot in the door just like a lot of minority groups ( that include women of all race , religion and creed).

  • au napptural

    Re-posting this! I honestly haven’t been following the case, but I get the same all the time at UF. These entitled brats want to blame affirmative action. Actually, most of the black students I know had higher test scores and GPAs then them. I had an almost perfect reading SAT score, a 4.92 GPA, and received several academic scholarships. These white people like to live in denial, but I always say there are no affirmative action honors, grades, or degrees. Who you going to blame when the black kids graduate summa cum laude?

  • Kacey

    I wanted to add this:

    I’m currently in the final year of a graduate program at a very large, respected university in the heart of NYC. Despite being in one of the most diverse cities on the planet, in my major classes I am the only (ONLY!) black person in a room of 60+ students. So I feel the lack of inclusiveness very acutely and it makes me angry sometimes. This is not just an issue affecting University of Texas. I have worked very hard to get to where I am, especially considering where I grew up, and I resent anyone who may feel that I don’t deserve to be there.

  • Ms. Information

    Or she will by the end of her college career.

  • Chika

    Aaaaallll of this. I go to an Ivy League school and I remember a White guy who was rejected from my school TWO years ago asking me what my ACT scores were. The hell?? Actually, my school had a Perspectives on Diversity weekend where they basically told all the non-White students, “You are sitting here because you deserve to be here. Don’t let anyone else tell you otherwise”. It was really inspiring.

  • JEff L

    First thing of buisiness. 1180 is not way below 1200. You act like she scored a 900. Second your argument is that she was not qualified to be accepted into UT. Which is a good point. But what about the minorities that got into UT with worse grades? How can you say that they were qualified? How can you not see that she was discriminated against because of the color of her skin? Is she was black she would of been accepted. That is discrimmination. It is wrong.

  • http://naeicanrepeatit.wordpress.com Nae

    This really gave me life!

  • http://thebrokejetsetter.com Brokejetsetter

    Oh how I wish, hope, and long that this reaches her. Someway, somehow. Why is this even going to the Supreme Court? And why is this even a split decision?

  • Houston

    Great piece, I hope this message reaches her, if not the article.

  • https://twitter.com/TheKMichel K. Michel

    “…you knew that [b]despite your legacy as the child of UT graduates[/b], a spot on the coveted honor roll and a lifelong affair with the cello that admission wasn’t guaranteed.”

    Nice letter. I don’t hear her complaining about White Americans taking “her spot” as I’m sure they make up the majority of the student body at UT.

    So, she’s a legacy of this school and a White woman (ironically allowing her access to gender-based Affirmative Action) …and still didn’t get in? The reason is that she’s a failure. I’m starting to think this whole uproar was her parents’ idea in the first place.

  • Houston

    Great piece, I hope this reaches her, if not the article.

  • Lady P

    Thank you! Thank you for this open letter. This is a must share with my youth circle.

  • Ange B

    I can’t comprehend this person’s thinking…so you didn’t get into one of the schools of your choice….SO WHAT! Isn’t that part of the whole applying to post secondary school all about? You get some rejection letters and acceptance letters sometimes.I just don’t see her point at all…affirmative action did not contribute to her denial. She did that herself, by not being the top in her school, and by having a weak SAT score. Did she even review the minimum requirements for entry into that school? Did she know that meeting the minimum is never a guarantee for admission? I honestly don’t understand her thinking…its illogical to me. It would be me going to the highest court every time I was rejected from a job I interviewed for what a waste of time. I hope she does not get her way in court and that affirmative action is upheld.

  • Crystal Fowler

    Eloquently put! Affrimative Action is being revisit for reversal in the US supreme court Abilgil Fisher V. University of Texas.

  • Yb

    Dammmmmnnnnnn a 1180 on your SAT!! Wow. White entitlement is a mutha, have you thinking your mediocre white behind deserves all kinds of ish.

  • http://twitter.com/Cognorati001 Colette Marcheline (@Cognorati001)

    “you have failed to mention that you graduated number 82 in a class of 674 with a 3.59 grade point average on a 4.0 scale, which alienated you from the automatic admissions bunch. You conveniently omit that you scored an 1180 on your SAT, which is way below UT’s average, so that automatically diminished your chances of being accepted.”

    I was completely unaware of the above. It’s unbelievable that the Supreme Court would think that this case has merit, given the above.

    Just unreal. Whites really are entitled narcissists.

  • http://www.facebook.com/gianna.butterfield Gianna Butterfield

    This whole article is spot on, BUT when i read this:
    “This leads to one conclusion: Affirmative action is not the issue. Now, before you attempt to bash me as another black woman benefiting from federal mandates, let me clarify: I scored a 1680 on the SAT and I was accepted into every undergraduate institution that I applied to. I graduated from Bennett College Summa Cum Laude and valedictorian with a 4.0 grade point average and I’m on a full ride merit-based fellowship for graduate school”

    I got chills. YOU GO GIRL! I love intelligent black women!

  • simplyme

    Perfect.

  • UT Alum

    This is the BEST analysis I’ve read yet. (I’m white, female, and went to UT many years ago). I have a mixed family, and I believe the top 10% rule has done a lot of good for diversifying UT. People like my beautiful Black nieces deserve a shot, and you better believe that their mom and dad are educating them very well. My own daughter is 4, and she already knows that you don’t just get what you want handed to you on a silver platter.

    Abigail had her shot, and if she felt this poorly about being rejected for admission, she could have gone to UT Arlington or UT San Antonio and tried again as a transfer student. I can’t believe that her complaints are “I would have gotten a much better job if I had the UT Alumni network in my back pocket”.

  • http://www.boissuq.com/ Keli

    As a black Texas – EX, it pains me that we are always at the the forefront of race and college admissions, dating back to the Sweatt v. Painter. I a black female, graduated from the top 10% of my HS class, and was automatically admitted. My sister, missed the cut off and had to go the provisional route. Everyone in the state of Texas knows that being an Avg. student will not allow you admissions into THE University of Texas, and we are now looking at implementing a top 8% admittance requirement because the competition is just that stiff. Thus you hit the nail on the head… this case is about nothing more than “white privilege.” I pray the Supreme Court gets this one right.

  • RSNewsbee

    Gwen Ifill, but yes I agree with you.

  • Morehouse Brother

    Your Brother, a junior at Morehouse College, letting you know this was beyond great. Your ancestral juices were kicking in with this letter #muchRespect

    Sincerely,
    Another Despiser of white privilege

  • duoyo

    Absolutely perfect!

  • Pseudonym

    Yeah, seriously. I went to a blue ribbon high school and was upper 10%- why couldn’t she do that if she thinks she’s such a shoe-in for that university?…

  • Alec

    Awesome post…This needed to be said. Cable news reporting at all about Ms. Fisher’s academic record before applying?

  • http://www.rishona.com Shona

    Excellent! I hope she reads this…thoroughly!

  • Perspective

    Oh pohlease – I’ll end this little girls career right now.

    Perspective:

    Ask her to ask the school, “How many white people got into the school with lower grades and test scores than you got.”

    Drops the mic and walks off the stage.

  • MyTwoCents

    I agree with the post. However, I think if Abigail Fisher hadn’t launched a case, some other white person would have. There are those who have been itching to remove any possible aids to move upward to society to minorities for years. Abigail is just the latest face they choose to use.

  • Debbie

    As a UT alumni, I just want to say thank you for this. I have so much to say but I’m just so angry right now. The girl is from my city too…

  • cmarjo

    This is great. My only critical comment/question is in reference to the SAT scores mentioned here. Abigail Fisher’s score (I assume) and the UT average score are in the 2-section format, while the author’s score is in the three-section format, might want to consider changing that because I think it cheapens the comparison.

  • http://www.facebook.com/april.sparrow April Haydock Sparrow

    This is so sad! A white girl complaining of being the subject of racism! I am a white female and I don’t go around saying, “Oh, poor me, I didn’t get into the college I wanted, pity me please!” That is exactly what she is saying! Wake up, little girl, and smell the coffee, you are in the real world now! GET OVER IT!!!! You weren’t qualified, that is the problem, not that you are white!

  • NOitAll

    First, this case may make things difficult for white females as well. As we all know, white females have been the greatest beneficiaries of affirmative action. Even though they never actually fought for it.

    Second, did it ever occur to Abigail Fisher that it wasn’t some Black or Mexican person that took “her spot” at UT Austin? Maybe she just wasn’t good enough. Just because it’s your dream college, doesn’t mean you’re entitled to get in. If she had studied harder and made the top 10% in her class this wouldn’t be an issue for her. So, she herself is just another mediocre student trying to get over.

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    you got any evidence of that? no? shut up!

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    excellent writing. i wish it could be more widely distributed.
    perhaps clutch can get it out there?

  • http://gravatar.com/riverbrat riverbrattuck

    Racism, pure and simple. UT did it to me as well, denying me entrance to allow minorities with lessor qualification because of my skin color.

  • TacoRocket

    I think the correct answer to ask here is fairly simple. Did anyone non-white get into UT that scored lower on the curve of both academic and personal admissions standards than Abagail did? If yes, then she has a case of reverse racism. (And lets be honest. Calling something ‘reverse racism’ is quite silly. Racism is racism.) Either everyone meets the standards for the school, regardless of race or sex, or something is quite wrong. In either case, Abagail doesn’t deserve admission, because she failed to meet the minimum standard.

  • Smilez_920

    It doesn’t matter if her SAT score was 1199 and she was one person away from being in the top 10%. She still didnt meet the qualifications.

    I keep hearing these arguments about racism happened so long ago so AA is not needed. Yet the first thing that came to this girls mind is that some unqualified black or Mexican took her spot. A white women could have taken her spot. A school like UT also has a legacy program/ criteria. Maybe the child of an alum out bid her for that spot. Also people who work and teach at the school get presedence to send their children there. Ooo but let me guess all the children who fall under those categories are smart and well rounded and deserve to be there right :/

    Not just that, everytime America talks about AA that make it seem like it only includes race. AA includes race, gender, religion , culture and someone’s financial backgroud.

  • http://www.adjunctmom.com Beth

    I think you missed the part about even if she had a perfect personal achievement score (which is where race comes in), she would not have been admitted. This leads me to conclude that the people of color admitted MUST have either higher SAT scores, higher GPAs or possibly both.

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    To be fair, compare the old and new SAT scores. Your scores were essentially the same:

    http://teachers.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/lccounseling/sat-act_conversion_chart.htm

  • Dave

    “If affirmative action is gutted and substituted with ‘neutral-based admissions,’ institutions will have the option to deny students access to the educational American Dream based on their ethnic background.”

    This will most likely not be a popular response but the contradiction inherent in this article’s argument must properly addressed. I am not arguing that Ms. Fisher was a victim of “reverse racism” because such a form of racism simply doesn’t exist. One look at the numbers (and seriously white people, look at the numbers) and even with affirmative action in its fourth decade of existence, blacks are still overwhelmingly under represented on college campuses. Furthermore, as the author correctly states, Ms. Fisher was not in any way exceptionally qualified for admission to the university and it goes without saying that many hundreds of white applicants also failed to impress to admissions board sufficiently that year. Her case is a weak one, perhaps even one of the weakest in the long history of such cases.

    That being said, the whole concept of a neutral-based admission means just that: neutral. No one group, in theory, is favored over the other: not gays, whites, asians, transexual, or black. No rich over poor, no legacy over first timer. It is, in other words, what the Civil Rights Movement was fighting for in the first place. Affirmative Action was never intended and indeed should never have been intended to be a permanent solution. I will not criticize the Supreme Court for moving us in a direction that we are supposed to be moving towards in the first place.

    Moreover, a final word about that aforementioned under representation: we as a community are mostly to blame. As a college graduate and law school applicant I can assert that it is academic success and not institutional racism at the university level that most influences our chance at admission. I didn’t get into Harvard because, well, I didn’t make the grade. Simply put, the nation as a whole would take our claims more seriously if we took our education just as seriously. Do not blame poverty, asian americans are just as impoverished (again look at those numbers) but are significantly outpacing even whites in math, science, and sat scores. The day Harvard, Yale, or the University of Texas denies 60% of black applicants, 30% of whom significantly surpassed admission requirements (3.9 GPA’s, ridiculous score on SAT’s, and extra-extracurriculars like woah) let me know. Seriously, I would like to see that day.

  • Cocochanel31

    I agree with Jeff that her grades were not bad(3.5 is above average), nor was her SAT that much lower than the 1200, however, can she prove that the minorites that were accepted had lower everything than her? That is why I am confused as to why she thinks she has a case? What about the other 100 people rejected, were they all well below the admissions requirement. Since selection is not based on academics alone, maybe her personal essay sucked, or her extra achievements were not good enough to boost her in, there are so many variables, so how did she automatically pull the race card. I am confused.

  • JNique27

    Thanks for writing this piece, I love it!!

  • DocDirtyD

    Yes, Bennett Alumna! When I read about her case I immediately thought that she was an underachiever and she feels entitled to something she did not earn. As a graduate of a class of 483 I was ranked in my top 10% of my class with a 3.995 GPA and ranked something like 45. It’s really not that hard to do well in the American education system. Shameful what she’s doing.

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    got any facts or evidence?

  • Smilez_920

    Again why are you assuming that a less qualified minority was choosen over you. Only a small percent of the school is black. I’m sure that % ( minus the sports teams) are very qualified maybe even , dare I say it more qualified than you.

    Maybe a white women took your spot. Or a white male from out of state took you spot. Out of state tuition = more dollars for the school . Maybe they met their own personal criteria of students who resume look similar to yours and wanted to shake things up. Or maybe try just didnt like you. And even if a less qualified minority took your spot . SO WhAT. Plenty of less qualified white ppl have been admitted to college because of ( legacy admissions, connections, their parents work at the school and money) o but wait we cant bring that too light.

    No school is denying white men ( because white women are included in AA) the right to attend their school so quote on quote under qualified minorities can attend. SO cut the bull

  • http://EvetteDionne.com Evette

    Abigail and I are the same age. We took the SAT in the same year.

  • Smilez_920

    Even with that if a non-white and a white person got in with qualifications that didnt match hers, then what. And if their qualifications didnt meet hers their application probably wasn’t even in the same ranking or process as hers when the school was making final decisions .

  • http://www.evettedionne.com Evette Dionne

    Abigail and I are the same age. We took the SAT at the same time for the same admission year

  • isolde3

    I and others noticed that too. 1680 out of 2400 points. isn’t that high, and UT admits students that aren’t in the top 10% of their class. I think her grades and scores were low . . . for a white girl because I really do have a hard time believing that someone black or Latino would have been rejected from UT Austin, if they were, like Abigail, ranked in the top 12% of their class with an A average and an 1180 combined Math/Verbal SAT. The fact that Fischer could rank that high in her class with a 3.59 GPA doesn’t indicate that her grades were paltry or that she was unqualified. Really, what it suggests is that she may have gone to a competitive high school that may not have inflated grades.

  • BoutDatLove

    She looks like something from ”The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” I had to do it…

  • isolde3

    @Evette

    Right, but what I think “marisa” is saying is that Fischer’s 1180 was based on the combined score of two sections of the SAT (reading/verbal, math). The fact that you boasted a score over 1600 suggests that your score was a combination of all three sections of the SAT (reading/verbal, math, writing)

  • Smilez_920

    I’m not goin to say you are wrong. You do have some points . But just like a lot of ppl your making it seem like AA is exclusively something to help blacks.

    AA- helps with race , gender, religion etc…

    I’m sure there could have been some Asian applicants who have been helped by AA. We need to stop making it seem like black ppl are the poster children for AA. More white women in this country have been helped by AA than a lt of other groups.

    Now lets say there is a black person at UT’s whose grades weren’t as good as hers. How can she prove that their applications were out against one another and he/she was chosen over her. Maybe it was between her and another white girl. Maybe if the minority was chooser there were other aspects that came into play. But if the court can’t prove without a shadow of a doubt that out of all the students that qualifications didnt meet hers , that the black/Mexican persons is the one that took her spot, then she has no real case.

    AA was created to make sure that qualified minority group ( this includes white women) who have been discriminated against have a fair shot. It doesn’t get them anything but help then get a foot in the door most of the time , which ultimately makes a difference.

  • BoutDatLove

    Wow, amazing & congrats to you, I hope I can do the same!

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    “we as a community are mostly to blame”

    we oppressed our own selves? why would we do that?

  • Caity

    Very well said, sir. The author says that schools will deny applicants based on their race– that it simply not true and such action is illegal, not because of affirmative action. I think it’s also important to differentiate de facto versus de jure discrimination, as you point to– making these practices “neutral” can effectively eliminate the former of the two, and it’s up to the rest of us to reduce the latter.

  • LaNubiana

    Dear African Americans,

    For some reason, I’m overwhelmed with emotions in reading this article and it isn’t even about someone dying. However, I just want to take a few moment to say a few things. I’ve so much respect and admiration to you African Americans sisters and brothers for your patience in dealing with this kind of things in daily basis. Even if we are almost a world away, I’m (we Africans are if i may speak on balf of them) consistently reminded of your strength in this never ending race battles. We Africans have our own conflicts and wars but other than a few nations such as South Africa, most of us are fighting with our own brothers and sisters (not that it’s a good thing of course). But we Africans living here in motherland or abroad know that if it wasn’t for your struggles and fight, we wouldn’t be living in or visiting America as dignified black people. Africans living in America are benefiting from the very price your ancestors and you have paid with sweats and blood. Just know that it wasn’t in vain. I read these sort of articles and I’m moved and emotional because even tho I live in a ‘poverty stricken’ country, I’m not profiled and subjected to certain things like you have been and continue to struggle with. But this only motivates my generation of Africans to get even further proactive in to building the bridge for Pan-Africansm. Your ancestors and you are my heros! Thank you for everything.

  • Jane Smich

    You spelled the word ‘lesser’ as “lessor”. Perhaps why you didn’t get in. :)

  • Dave

    I ask myself that question every day.

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    if you do not understand racism everything else you see will confuse you…..

  • Smilez_920

    What if another white girl with her qualifications or less got her spot .

    I mean you talk about building a more diversified school. Maybe they had enough white girls with 3.59 GPA ‘ s and decided that try wanted to add other students from different cultures and background ( international students). And maybe one of those students black or not had a little lower GPA , but fit the new qualifications of what the school was looking for. And what if that person wants black or Latino , then what , then what’s her excuse. The school only has a handful of blks and Latinos ( I doubt that that little hand full , was the reason, did she check out all the less qualified kids that got in on legacy , or because their family donates to the school or because they are the child of a staff member.

  • http://theblackgirloncampus.blogspot.com Peace

    An 1180 is a really low SAT score and a 3.5 is not that impressive either. Colleges look at the vigor of classes and SAT scores more than they pay attention to GPA because they realize that some high schools are too lenient when it comes to grades. She needs to except that she just didn’t do well enough to get into the college.

    However, if she had a 2000 and 3.9 GPA then she would have had an argument.

  • Alexa

    I’m a student at San Francisco State University. I applied to over 15 colleges. Many were reach, some were safety and a few were my dream. I was rejected from over half of them. My grades were alright, my test scores were mediocre. I had good recommendations and extracurriculars. But what I think that Abigail failed to understand and she may not understand this until her children are applying to college is that it doesn’t matter where you go to college. She argues that if she attended UT she would have a better career due to alumni connections. She fails to realize that it’s what you make of it and the effort you put in. If she really wants a great career or a higher paying job, she needs to work towards it and not blame UT. I’m 20 years old. When I was 18 years old in my second semester of college, I scored a dream internship with a very important politician. My fellow interns attended UC Berkeley, a school I was rejected from. My university wasn’t my dream school but I made the best of it and i’m still making the best of it. Hopefully this case will not only teach Abigail a lesson but a lesson for all future college students who are so fixated on attending their “dream” university.

  • GlowBelle

    If only Abigail Fisher herself would read this and get a clue, because this is an EXCELLENT open letter.

    I tried to get into UT back in ’05 as it was my first choice pick too. I had a higher HS GPA than Fisher, but I made the wait-list and was told in a wordy letter to take community college courses and then reapply and maybe *maybe* there was a sliver of a chance I would get in. Screw that. I chose another school who actually accepted me, graduated from it, and was glad. Orange wasn’t my color anyway…

    Still I didn’t cry “racism!”, because any fool can really get into college (seriously, some of the dumbest people I’ve met have degrees…), but sometimes not every college wants you and your color/racial background is not always at play. You should go to the schools that WANTS you. And rejection is a part of life…it’s gonna happen. Living in Texas, I know that UT is the #1 school to get into and its glowing reputation is pretty damn sickening, but it’s not the ONLY good school in the state, and in the country. I think we’ve set ridiculous stock in a lot of these universities and we’ve become conditioned that if we didn’t get into this particular school something is wrong with the system as a whole. No. It doesn’t work that way.

    All what happened is that Ms. Fisher got butt hurt because for probably the first time in her whole life she wasn’t handed something or got her way, and here she is throwing an entitled fit, one of epic proportions that makes her look, not like a white privileged jerk, but just a ignorant jerk period.The more things I read about her and her arguments, the stupider she sounds to me.

    Thank you for writing this.

  • http://theblackgirloncampus.blogspot.com Peace

    I forgot to add that it has been proven that AA benefits white women the most. She had AA on her side and she still didn’t get accepted.

  • Chocolate_cyn

    I heart this analysis sooo much right now

  • yat_kuen

    UT’s briefing before the Supreme Court clearly states that Fisher’s SAT score was 1180 out of 1600, so unless you’re saying that you got a better-than-perfect score on your SAT, or that UT’s lawyers missed an opportunity to make her look even worse, it’s clear that your score and her score are based on two different point scales.

  • WhatIThink

    Bottom line this is a sinister ploy by elements within white society to demonize black folks and gain sympathy for whites as if they need sympathy.

    Nothing that happened to this girl in any way equates to 300 years of legal slavery and Jim Crow in America. Taking this case in front of the supreme court is tantamount to saying that all the discrimination and oppression faced by millions of black folks in America is not as important as possibly denying advancement to one young white girl.

    Seriously.

    No one in their right minds should see this as anything but an insult.

    Black folks don’t run these schools, don’t run the admissions boards and certainly did not create affirmative action. Therefore, trying to slander black folks as somehow “discriminating” against someone is insulting and pandering to misplaced sympathy for those who have a history of actual discrimination against not JUST black people but all non white people.

    The only way affirmative action should be dismantled is when the impact of the programs have been analyzed and studied to determine if discrimination at all levels in eduction, employment and housing has been ended. But they won’t do that, they will play these silly games in order to end affirmative action without showing how the society itself which created the discrimination has actually changed.

    But what they want to do is to demonize black folks by using Affirmative Action as somehow “unfair” to everyone, even as European Americans have had 300 years of affirmative action on all levels which they know full well is why they are where they are today. It is simply a con game and ploy to make black folks who do get ahead feel unworthy and paint black folks as somehow beggars and only looking for handouts. But of course the larger society which used slavery, jim crow and genocide to get where they are today are above reproach and the epitome of everything good and decent right?

    Right.

  • Gell0h0h

    During high school, I took Advanced Placement courses and Honor courses simulatenously. I was an active member of the National Honor Society, president of BPA, manager of the school store and cafe as well as volunteering at local community organizations and hospitals. I graduated high school with a 4.3! and I was still number 10 in the class. My SAT scores were not too hot – I scored an 1080 out of 1600 but my ACT was a 21 and I was taking all AP Courses and still managed to place myself in civic engagement, community outreach, remaining studious and still have a life. I applied to 6 colleges and got accepted into all of them and chose the one which provided me with financial assistance and scholarships… and whatever was not covered, I had to cover because my mother as a single parent would not be able to support me financially. And the PWI I graduated from – African Americans accounted for less than a 1/10 of the population.

    So Fisher… what’s the problem? Get your life. Analyze it three times for me. NEXT!

  • IAW

    Pot, meet kettle. How about we all take responsibility for our own livelihoods and stop relying on big brother to pay us for the wrongs we believe we’ve been done? Because its easier to collect the fruits of white guilt – perpetuate the free ride, right?

  • Jazz

    “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.” It’s a spirited, well-written (overall) letter and whatnot.. however, it may have benefited from some more scrutinous proof-reading. I’m thinking “You were not _rejected from_ the University. . .” may have been more congruent. The original version seems rather in accordance with the plaintiff’s baseless argument. Just saying.

  • apple

    this chick didn’t get into UT because her grades wasn’t good enough..she could have been black as night and her ass would have still not get in.. this was four years ago,she still graduated from a good school and shes complaining for what? SHE IS A FINANCIAL ANALYST AT XEROX and just graduated!! most graduates today aren’t even managers of retail stores.. ugh ungrateful child

  • Gell0h0h

    Right!

  • Paul

    This is such a distraction. The question is whether UT’s policy of admitting students, at least in part, based on the student’s membership in one racial group as opposed to another violates the 14th Amendment of the Constitution. Whether Abigail Fisher was qualified or not is irrelevant.

  • Ange B

    Loved your comment!

  • Jennifer

    Are you at Dartmouth??? ’02!

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    What others said above. Her score would have been very inconsistent with her GPA and class rank if it were truly 1180 out of 2400. The switch happened in 2005-2006, right before I graduated. I had to take both, but sometimes schools still operated on the 1600 scale for a few years because it was hard to know what a “good score” on the 2400 scale was. I wouldn’t be surprised if her score was reported as 1180 out of 1600 vs X out of 2400 because it was a big mental shift for everyone at the time.

    I’m not trying to minimize your accomplishments (a 4.0 in college is an amazing one). But it is dishonest to minimize this girl’s academic achievements to make a point when they are similar to your own. It sounds like you did so unintentionally.

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    Well, that was rude.

  • Emily

    This is great but ” You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white” should probably be “You were not DENIED admission to the University of Texas at Austin because you were white.”

  • Jennifer

    Seriously, is that necessary? Dog her on the facts of the case, not on her looks. Regardless of how much I vehemently disagree with her actions, I don’t think she deserves any of these comments. You’re not helping the discussion here.

  • http://girlsbestfriendandcoblog.com Girls Best Friend and Co

    You have blown me away young lady. Blown me away.. Don’t be so hard on poor little Abigail. She’s probably worked as hard as she could with no avail. I as a black women do not take it personal. She’s looking for a scapegoat, more than anything I am truly sad for her. The fact that she believes she lost a spot because of a black person speaks to her intelligence. The fact that they are spending time and energy pursuing the issue speak further to the intelligence of her and her handlers. I appreciate your need to vent. You have done so, quite well I might add.

  • Concerned Citizen

    Here’s a math question for you:

    Which number is greater:

    A) 1180/1600 (Fisher’s SAT score divided by the scale she used)

    B) 1680/2400 (Your SAT score divided by the scale you used)

    Just something to think about.

  • Marseeuh

    LOVE IT

  • Vulkan He’Stan

    Several problems with this.

    1. Issue is not whether Abby would have made the cut, but whether we still need to be using race as a factor. So her credentials are irrelevant, next to the real issue of whether correcting for differences in opportunities during K-12 is better accomplished by replacing whatever racial criteria is in college admissions with socioeconomic status instead.
    2. Removing race as a factor allows colleges to deny applicants based on race – wait, what? How does removing factor X from the decision making process result in X being used to make decisions?
    3. Privilege is a fine concept for sociologists who want to analyze society. It is less fine when used to decide who should get what. Sure, white people in the past oppressed you and got a leg up on everyone. But white people today didn’t, and the SCOTUS has always said “addressing past wrongs” is not a justification.

    I do not believe black people are inherently dumber than others, merely that on average they suffer from a lack of the same opportunities due to predominantly living in poorer neighborhoods. Thus the solution is to, if any preferential treatment is to be given at all, to give it based on socioeconomic status and not on race.

  • Lisa J

    I think that colleges take the highest cumulative, which is usually the highest math plus critical reading score.

    I wonder whether her 1180 was from a single sitting or was from separate two sittings.

  • Smilez_920

    No this is not a distraction. This story is what created the question you speak of.

    If Abigail’s lawyers can prove that somehow she was discriminated against solely because of the color of her skin , then AA will look like a system that was meant to segregate instead of intergrate.

    Again she is using her qualifications as justification for why she should have been picked. shes also using the qualifications of others who do not look like her to make a bigger case of why she was not chosen. Therefore it’s only right that we focuse on them because they are a piece of the bigger puzzle.

  • http://theantifash.blogspot.com TheAntifash

    #DEAD

  • Lisa J

    Those who weren’t in the top 10% competed in a separate pool. Very few people were admitted from that pool.

  • simplykat

    As a higher education phd student white female – thank you for your rant, it is needed and students need to realize that privilege DOES exist and students need to understand this at a younger age, affirmative action is legal and by taking this away I would be ashamed at our judicial branch – the supreme court should not even be looking at this case. She was never qualified to begin with. The end. The court should not be addressing this, this is a conservative court attempting to take advantage of this hideous case.

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    The max you can get on the Quantitative portion of the SAT is 800. How is that greater than 1180?

  • Lisa J

    Another thing to consider: maybe those who were considered over her were athletes or were related to big donors.

  • jourdan

    Go head!

    We KNOW there are plenty of blacks who simply can go to whatever university they choose because they qualify & don’t need A.A.But we seem to be ashamed of the fact that without A.A. some blacks wouldn’t be in college. Yes, it’s embarrassing that we have to jump over hell and high water to be treated fairly, but that’s the REALITY! Wake up people! Racism is alive and EXTREMELY well & it doesn’t look like it’s going anywhere anytime soon! So yes, I do believe we need these certain provisions… for those who need it! And it’s not just racism, it’s sexism, too.

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    1180 out of 1600, not 2400

  • Alex A

    First I would like to say that I don’t disagree with anything that you say. I don’t think that affirmative action is to blame for Ms. Fisher’s rejection letter. However I do want to ask where you got the SAT information? The SAT has been graded on a 2400 scale since I was a senior in high school (2008). The national average is somewhere around 1500, UT’s average is in the upper 1600′s.

  • Smilez_920

    I agree with some of your points about switching race ( even thought AA has focus on gender, religion , and culture as well) for socioeconomic AA would help black ppl even more ( if its placed for K-12).

    There will still be someone complaning . Just like Abagail.

    If they used that tactic on the college level I can already hear someone saying ” I didn’t get in school because they picked a poor kid over me”.

    Also while I know this case is on race, how do you think changing AA from its current quotas to an economic quota . I mean mid -high middle class white women have been the biggest beneficiaries of the current state of AA. Do you think they will be as willing to change the current policy if we started looking at it from a gender perspective instead of always looking at it from a race Perspective.

  • Chrissy

    I agree with this.

    But it is really interesting to me that some white people believe that they are always better, smarter, etc than a black person. They give white people the benefit of a doubt all the time…But a black person always has to prove something. It’s like some white people cannot believe a black person just might be smarter. MORE QUALIFIED.

    Very interesting mentality that some white people have….

  • Paul

    She was necessarily discriminated against based on the color of her skin. If there was no AA policy, her chances of being admitted would have increased. Indeed, the chances of every non-minority applicant being admitted would have increased, because they do not get the “bump” for being a minority. The question is whether that sort of discrimination is lawful. Or, more specifically, whether the the way the UT plan discriminates is lawful. The answer to that question does not turn, even in the slightest, on Ms. Fisher. I don’t know the answer. The Supreme Court will tell us soon enough. Even that, though, will not resolve the larger question of whether AA is a prudent policy.

  • Miya

    Wait, white people today don’t get a leg up? Are you fucking kidding me? The VAST majority of people who run this country are white, from elected officials to CEOs. Blacks and Hispanics are still paid far less than their white counterparts for exactly the same job. Racism is still absolutely rampant in our society, maybe not as blatantly as it was in the past, but that doesn’t mean it’s gone.

    And Fisher’s credentials are relevant. She’s arguing that her education and career path were harmed by not getting into UT, and that the reason she didn’t get into UT was due to Affirmative Action. The former is questionable at the least, but the latter is outright false. In order to pursue legal retribution of this sort, you have to prove that you have suffered some kind of harm, so if she’s attacking Affirmative Action she has to prove that that policy has harmed her. Her credentials show otherwise.

  • http://gravatar.com/nolakiss16 binks

    Right! Great article and I agree with majority of the comments. Abigail Fisher seems very entitled and frankly full of it. Guess what you got rejected build a bridge and get over it.

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    “Sure, white people in the past oppressed you and got a leg up on everyone. But white people today didn’t”

    white people of today are living off the ill got gains of their fore fathers. do the children of criminals get to keep the money that was gained by their fathers criminal activities?

  • Ms. Information

    and this is why I beleive in SOME form of reparation….as our Native American, Japanese and Jewish counterparts have received….they are STILL eating off of our blood.

  • http://theblackgirloncampus.blogspot.com Peace

    I just realized that, but a 1180 still isn’t impressive. In my University, they only base on 2 sections as well (1600) and the minimum requirement is around a 1300. UTexas wanted a 1200.

    She wasn’t qualified, even with AA working for her.

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    Except I was correct?

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    “the fruits of white guilt”

    whites don’t feel guilt….

  • XC45

    Then why not have the black people in Africa who sold slaves pay, too? They were also complicit, right? To make it all even, stop all aid to Africa for the next century or so. That, of course, is absurd.

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    I’m really confused as to how you made this assumption given you don’t know the breakdown of her verbal and quantitative scores? And if you did get a perfect math score, good for you–that is pretty awesome.

    Based on the scale I posted above (which was honestly the best thing I could find to objectively compare the two), Abigail’s score on the new test would equal about a 1760, which is nothing to sneeze at and actually a bit higher than the author’s score, who obviously did well in college.

    And according to the College Board, her score of 1180 put her firmly in the 75th percentile

    http://www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/counselors/hs/sat/resources/handbook/4_InterpretingScores.pdf

    (This is from 2004, but shouldn’t be too off)

    Are you really saying 75% of students don’t deserve to go to college? I kind of doubt that.

  • Jason

    Nice. So the Supreme Court of the United States of America just totally forgot to check that she was simply not qualified for admission… I see. Wait, that’s not the issue at all!!
    In fact, UT is not arguing against the assertion that there were indeed individuals admitted for the term in which she applied whose merits were less than those of Ms. Fisher.

    How is it Ms. Fisher’s fault that the state school administrators in Texas (and many, many other states) refuse to solve the problem of underperforming schools in their state? UT sought to balance the ineptitude of state administrators by selectively admitting those from underperforming schools — that this is somehow a “solution” is a logical fallacy. Petty thieves will steal a pack of gum from one store in order to make-up for being short-changed somewhere else the day before — thus, in their minds, the universe is back in balance. “Logic” like this does not belong in a reputable university where intellectual rigor and meritocracy are supposed to rule.

    I went to a predominantly black high school. I am not black. It was a fun experience. It was also a huge set back for all of us! The school band (in which I was a proud member) was the best! We owned every half-time show and every parade in which we were participating. Everyone involved worked hard to make it a success! The scholastic ethic among the students, however, was poor! Horrible! This despite the *excellent* teachers the district assigned to our school — especially in English and Mathematics. We all got passed through from Freshman to Senior though, so it was no big deal — until it came time to apply for university. Only then did many of us who had mistaken hopes of going to a prestigious university get the surprise of our lives.

    It is not the job of the schools to raise kids — that’s the parents’ job. I can only shake my head at the job my parents did not do in bringing me up properly. I struggle even today to make-up for that loss. Even as a high school kid, though, I would have known something was wrong if my school held me back a grade — as I no doubt deserved given my performance back then. The state didn’t want its schools to look bad despite an obvious culture of apathy among the parents for my school, so they passed us along. For us, it was way (way!) more important to have the latest Nike Air Jordans on your feet than it was to have made an ‘A’ on the last exam, and the parents were largely absent/apathetic the whole time.

    It’s a shame that America subdivides its cultures according to race (ie acting “white” versus acting “black” or being “black enough” etc), but since that’s the way it is, I’ll state the following bluntly:

    In what is deemed to be “Black” culture, image is everything — everything! Intellectual pursuits have almost no value whatsoever. This is *the* problem. Distorted university admissions processes will not correct this, only parents’ willingness to raise their children properly can correct this.

  • http://twitter.com/gennatay Gennatay (@gennatay)

    “some of the dumbest people I’ve met have degrees”<—-Co-Sign

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    Sure, she didn’t meet the 1200, no doubts about that. But 1180 out of 2400 is the 16th percentile and her comparable score of 1760 (if converted from the 1600 format to the 2400) is the 79th percentile. That is a big difference, and that was my point:

    http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/research/SAT-Percentile-Ranks-Composite-CR-M-W-2012.pdf

  • Jason

    The vast majority of people who run the country are caucasian (white), therefore white people must be getting a “leg up”? This is fallacious. There is an election coming up, look at your trial ballot and research the candidates; how many people of color are running for office in your area? Not many in my area either. If you don’t run, you can’t win. If you do run and you don’t campaign, you can’t win. It’s not good enough to simply get your name on the ballot; you have to go shake some hands, go raise some campaign funds, etc… More people of color should run for public office.

    Minorities are paid less or are getting passed over for executive positions despite doing the same work or having the same credentials? I am certain that is happening and each instance of discrimination is a civil rights case and should be pursued. It’s not like people don’t win their cases when such cases can be proven, and proving them is a simple matter of using the courts to requisition the official records for the workplace involved (as was done in the University of California case). Unfortunately, racism will always exist — it is naive to think otherwise. This is why popularly elected officials and a justice system (imperfect as it is) exists in this country — to mitigate the stupidity of racism and other human foibles.

  • arjun

    Many people talking about Fisher v UT fail to understand the impacts upon non black/hispanic minority groups.

    If you’re an Asian American, especially in Texas, Fisher v University of Texas has HUGE ramifications for you. In the status quo, it’s significantly harder for Asians of equal merit to qualify for anything, simply because Asians in general are stronger academically. You’re essentially being punished because Asians are smart.

    If the court favors Fisher, fairness will prevail. You will no longer have to score 1550 to a white kid’s 1410, or a black’s 1100. (Out of 1600, rather than 2400).

  • http://gravatar.com/marissac88 marissac88

    I don’t understand your argument. I brought up the 75% fact because that is the percentile Abigail’s score is in (actually 79% according to the newer numbers I found below), but you said, “a total 1180 score on ANY scale is a retarded enough reason to waste my tax dollars.”

    The only thing I could get out of that statement is that feel anyone with a score lower than that (75-79% of students) doesn’t deserve to go to college, which is why I questioned your statement. I truly don’t believe you mean that. But what do you mean? It really isn’t clear.

    I’m sorry you are bored, but that is okay. Other readers can decide for themselves what to make of our discussion.

  • Eric

    Um, actually, the issue is entirely whether she would have made the cut, since otherwise she wouldn’t have suffered the harm required to give her standing to sue.

    Also, privilege is already used to decide who gets what, since otherwise it wouldn’t be a useful sociological concept.

    Agreed on 2; I think she could’ve made a much more convincing argument for the harm a ruling in Abigail’s favor would have on this country and on people of color in particular.

  • Smilez_920

    If the government wants to trade in race and gender Affrmative action for socioeconomic affirmative action, I’ll take the trade.

    Under two conditions

    1) this type of affirmative action must happen from kindergarten through college. And it takes into account the location of the child, family circumstance and learning disabilities . ( I think this would actually help more ppl in our community ) ( helps ppl making less than 70,000 a yr )

    2) I don’t want to hear ppl who anyone who doesn’t fit the criteria . Because trust a lot of ppl won’t make it , complain that a poor person or finicially challenge person was unfairly accepted into a school or university. Trust with ppl like MITt Romeny running with the 47% ideology , uproar is bound to happen.

    Also I wonder if Race based Affrmative action is over turned how that will affect gender based Affrmative action. Trust it will h e some affect. The feminist movement wouldn’t have worked so closely with the black civil rights movement if they beleaved they couldn’t progress from the similar struggles and agendas

  • Rue

    I think she meant that Fisher got 1180/1600 (math and English oinly). That’s how many people calculate it. As for the autrhor’s1680, maybe they calcualted it differently when she was in high school, or maybe she meant to type 1580/1600.

  • andie

    I am a hispanic student at UT and this letter is so amazingly penned! Thanks for this. I am appalled at the public displays of entitlement I see white students carry around here in the university after this controversy; it’s so evident that it proves why this case cannot be ruled in Abigail’s favor. I earned my spot here and so did every single one my classmates, be they minorities or not. Let’s just keep our fingers crossed that everything goes well.

  • Concerned Citizen

    What’s funny is that when you compare the author’s and Fisher’s SAT scores on an equalized basis (i.e., account for the difference in scaling), Fisher actually outscored the author. Since the author thinks Fisher’s credentials equal “mediocrity,” one wonders what she thinks of her own capabilities.

  • Rue

    Oh give me a break and take the “I’m Asian so I’m naturally smarter”chip off your shoulder. This is why many Asians many the hell outta me.

  • Rue

    Per the women showing major cleavage and leg on Fox News:
    Yes! Yes! Yes! I wondered if i was the only one who noticed that. I wanna write an article about it but I am just biding my time.

  • Rue

    Yup! I feel it too! Anytime I walk into a physics/Engineering/Chem/Comp.Sci Class, all eyes were on me, and of course the “are you on scholarship else what the hell are you doing here” look.

  • Rue

    Ms. Fisher has some balls! I graduated 29/393 kids and made a 1890 on my SAT and never even applied to a top or middle school cause i knew my grades weren’t great. That being said they need to implement the top 10 rule in all the States.

  • Debbie

    Um, the author is not the one suing a school because she felt she should be admitted.

  • Rue

    Bush is reading this and saying: *add faux Texas accent* “Are they talkin’ bout me Laura? Are they?I knew the blacks never liked me.hehehe”

  • Debbie

    “I am appalled at the public displays of entitlement I see white students carry around here in the university after this controversy; it’s so evident that it proves why this case cannot be ruled in Abigail’s favor.”

    My goodness, I’m so glad that I’m not going there right now. I bet alot those students walking around feeling high and mighty are CAP students.

  • Rue

    Also, I have to ask in a loud azz voice: WHY DO WHITE PEOPLE THINK THART AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IS CLOGGING UP TOP SCHOOLS OR JUST ANY SCHOOLS WITH WHITES? HAVE YOU EVER TAKEN A LOOK AT HARVARD GRAD SCHOOL. LIKE 5 FLIES IN A GLASS OF MILK!!!!! sheesh.

  • Melinda

    Wow! That was beautiful.

  • Rue

    Sorry I meant “clogging up schools with Blacks”

  • ?!?

    Yes!!!! You should read the comments on mainstream sites. Oh! We’re oppressed these days. Oh poor us!

    When white women start talking about AA not being fair, and white men start asking are white women qualified for jobs or about the test scores of athletes or musicians or legacy students, maybe then I’ll start to care about their whining. No. When the US government really starts to address issues with black people and subpar schools, maybe I’ll care. Hey! That can make up for those lovely reparations that we never got. Until then, I’ll just take this as them trying to demonize black people because some mediocre girl got rejected and assuming some subpar black person got accepted in her place with no evidence.

    I’m serious about this oppression stuff I read from folks. I guess I can see how people might think that. I mean we are on completely different wavelengths. Many folks think because Barack Obama is the president and Gabby Douglas is a twice-medaled black gymnast and there was a black swimmer in the Olympics and Mia Love is a much loved black Republican, that everything is post-racial lol. Black folks can do anything they set their minds to! I mean if black men try really, really hard maybe they can overcome the fact that in lovely post-racial America, a white convict is more likely to get a callback for a job than a black man with no record. Denial indeed.

  • Concerned Citizen

    An 1890 SAT score would put you around the 98.5th percentile in terms of black Americans. That would mean you are one of the top 3,200 or so black college applicants in the entire nation. The University of Texas alone has about 2,300 black students in its undergraduate program. Considering that there are many, many schools even better than UT, and keeping in mind you were in the top 10% of your class, I can deduce two possibilities:

    1) If you are black, you set your sights too low.

    2) If you are not black, you should have been because you could have gone to a better school.

    I sincerely hope this helps.

  • Alex

    While I can tell the author is intelligent and sympathize with her sentiments, the Supreme Court is not ruling on Abigail’s admissibility, or her moral character, but on the Constitutionality of racial discrimination in admitting students. You can’t hide behind the word “diversity” to allow racial discrimination, diversity is just a euphemism for what race someone is, in this context. The author clouds the issue by targeting Abigail Fisher’s academic incompetence, and directly attacking her and her merits on whether she could be accepted or not. That is not what the Supreme Court is ruling on, it’s deciding the Constitutionality of racial discrimination. She could win this suit and still fail to get accepted. She could have had an “F” average and still have brought this suit.

    Food for thought, should people be judged solely on their merits, hard work, and credentials, or should race be part of the issue? Should the government quit requiring United States citizens to write their race in the census? Is affirmative action any different than, let’s say, giving discounts to certain races in retail stores or letting people get more rights because of the color of their skin? Can a bad person/annoying person be on the right side of a court case?

    Racial discrimination is not necessary for the needs of poor income children. You can base the admissibility on income directly and avoid the correlative factor of race altogether. There are a lot of creative ways to bypass having a policy with race as a prerogative in admissibility. Having a race based test is philosophically dangerous given American history, and where equity and personal merit find themselves mutually exclusive, this should not give institutions the right to racially discriminate.

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    “In what is deemed to be “Black” culture, image is everything — everything! Intellectual pursuits have almost no value whatsoever.”

    um, you said this while dialoging in virtual space with a bunch of black Intellectuals…..

  • Rue

    sweetie cuz you didn’t make a great score on a test at 7 AM on a Saturday morning doesn’t mean much to me or many people for that matter. I can reel off a list of names of smart people who didn’t do well on the SAT or didn’t even do well in college grade wise. The fact is that if you aren’t gonna make the cut by being in the top 10%, at least make a killer grade on the standardized tests so you have a freaking argument

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    this conversation shows that ‘post racial’ is a crack dream…..

  • Kacey

    “You’re essentially being punished because Asians are smart.”

    Whoa! I attend a university that has a very large Asian population. Asian’s dominance in academia is due to a combination of factors, many of which are admirable but, I assure you, NONE of which includes genetic racial superiority:

    1. Many come from cultures that are group-oriented, such that the actions of one is seen as a reflection on everyone. Therefore, they are pushed toward success (nothing less than the best is deemed to be acceptable) because their failure is a failure of the family (the entire community even!);

    2. Education is viewed as the best path toward a successful and happy life. Therefore, academic achievement is paramount in the minds of Asian parents and their children.

    3. Asian parents will go to any lengths to ensure their children are well-educated, including paying for tutoring and extra schooling. For example, during Elementary and Junior High School I was always competing academically with a Chinese boy, who I later learned attended extra classes on Saturdays. (I never took any extra classes and I still beat him.)

    4. The pressure to achieve, and make their parents proud, is tremendous so Asian students work hard to get good grades;

    5. Asian students also enjoy a great support system from parents, community and other Asian students.

    These are all very positive and (as I said before) admirable. If the black community as a whole would adopt these practices, we’d enjoy the same group success rate as Asians. However (partly due to all of the above factors) I have also observed that Asian students can be very competitive – to the point of neurosis, cut-throat behavior and CHEATING! Cheating among Asian students is huge in my school. Like I said before, Asian students usually form a network among themselves and it is through that network that they find methods to cheat, and they are able to get away with it precisely because they are believed to be “just smart”.

    You need to open your eyes and leave your racial stereotypes behind!

  • Colin

    The person who wrote this letter is less qualified than Abigail. Since she counted all 3 of her sections on the SAT (by reporting a score over 1600, she must have been) and since Abigail Fisher had an 1180, we are left to infer that Abigail scored higher.

    Also, Since half of admits are in the bottom half of their class and the average SAT score is 388 per section (500 is average)–we are left to infer that Bennet College is not the standard of excellence that the writer claims it is.

    With that being said, I am not here to bash Bennet College, but I do believe the author should consider that she sounds really hypocritical and foolish when she tells Abigail that she is mediocre even without race consideration when by all standards listed for both parties, Abigail outqualifiers the speaker.

    This letter loses all of its merit in those lines.

  • Rue

    how so? I made bout 300 points above hers but i am not a valedictorian of my school cuz i am not disciplined enough nor a genius. She busted her ass to get that 4.0 so the SAT is moot

  • amanda

    absolutely wonderful. well of the more well written responses. As a student of the University of Texas and a white person… I am sincerely embarrassed by this girl’s audacity. Like you said, mediocrity isn’t accepted at UT and neither in life… and that seems to be something that is her destiny.

  • Colin

    It’s frustrating how many people don’t realize how little is at stake with this court case. Honestly, is UT really going to start giving automatic admission to half of Sugarland High as a result? Absolutely not. All this case will do is push the admission criteria towards socio-economic status and away from race–ultimately, UT will remain just as diverse and possibly even more open to underprivileged communities–even if that’s not what Abigail had in mind.

    I say it will even slightly help underprivileged communities because a minority in such a community would then beat out a minority of an affluent family. Again though–UT isn’t going to become 90% white kids as a result of this case–even if it passes. They will just rewrite the criteria in a way that comes off more “race neutral.”

    So everyone quit your worrying!

  • Concerned Citizen

    “Um, the author is not the one suing a school because she felt she should be admitted.”

    That’s kind of the point. The author doesn’t have to do that because the standards under which she would be admitted are lower than they would be for white or Asian students.

    Besides, calling Fisher “mediocre” is just obnoxious when she demonstrates higher aptitude than the author in the first place.

  • Rue

    200

  • James

    Vul’kan, I think you, like Fischer, are making a few unwarranted asumptions- One, that those applicants under her were all or mostly minorities and that they weren’t as academically qualified. How do you, her or her lawyers know who got accepted back in 2005 and that race was the deciding factor? This reeks of a young woman’s sense of entitlement and revenge for a University simply telling her there were more qualified applicants. I’m sorry, but for UT 1180 out of 1600 isn’t gonna hack it. She could have retaken the test or tried to transfer after a year or two instead of pulling this to ease her personal demons.

  • ?!?

    @XC45 – I personally get sick of the “but black people sold you into slavery” argument. If I my uncle sold alcohol to my husband that magically refilled itself lol even though he knew my husband was a horrible drinker, and then my husband came home and beat the crap out of me, I’m going to be pissed at my husband more than my uncle. Also if my husband and I were to move away, my uncle would not know the full extent of how my husband treated me, I would be angry but still direct the majority of my anger towards my husband. He is the one there after all doing the beating and mistreating and I haven’t seen my uncle in a long time right?

    Slavery has existed for a long time all throughout the world. I think it was white Americans’ particular brand of evil and inhumanity and cruelty coupled with the terrorism of blacks and Jim Crow laws that makes African Americans direct the majority of their anger about slavery at white people. I mean it hasn’t even been a century since George Wallace stood in the doorway of the University of Alabama. People like to bring up slavery and how it was so long ago, but Jim Crow was not that long ago. My parents can remember not being able to eat in certain places. They don’t remember black people in Africa selling them into slavery.

  • Dave

    There is nothing confusing about personal responsibility. Last I checked there were no longer any laws against black folk reading books and the library is free. Last I checked there was no longer a need for armed guards to escort blacks into school. Last I checked, studying was a voluntary exercise that thousands of black students do every day on their way to successful professional and academic careers. This is not the 70′s, 60′s, or 50′s. Those battles were fought and won by parents and students who took their education and the access to it more seriously than we seem to do some forty years later. It is easy and lazy to continually blame racism for one’s failure to succeed. It is also insulting to those who achieve in spite of it.

    Did I miss something or is a black student who excels in math and science still considered an exception and not the rule? Did I miss something or does our culture still value athletic success over academic success? I went to a high school one block away from Bronx HS of Science, one of three specialized schools in the NYC Public School system. It was not racism that separated my graduating class from that one…it was academic performance and the time one committed to it. I know six friends from HS that dropped out, countless others that were satisfied with a “C’ average, and many more who placed a higher premium on what they were wearing as opposed to what college they wanted to go to. Denying racism is one thing…hiding behind it is another.

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.prestidge David Prestidge

    White guy here and former UT Alum: Brilliant writing. Clear. Concise. Devastating. I only wish this response got NYT front page coverage.

  • Rue

    May I my darling?

    6. Many Asians are a immigrants. Hence they came here with the specific purpose of achieving great things and going to a top college. In addition, most have advanced degrees and were not exactly street weepers at their home countries. Which is why they are more successful than say a poor Guatemalan or Ivorian maid who came her to be a maid.
    7. Asians were not systematically oppressed and raped economically in strange lands for over 500 years.

  • Rue

    Damn, someone should have told me this. yes I am Black. I applied to U Chicago and was put on the wait list, Notre Dame and was denied and one other and was denied from that as well, but that fell through. i wasn’t looking at it through racial lens, but through overall lens and when i saw some of the achievements of other kids, i panicked and fled, i guess. I addition, i applied and was a finalist for the quest Bridge National College match scholarship (this is where ND and UC came in) but wasn’t able to complete the applications for all but 2 cuz the SAT charged me a ton of money to send and send scores + find and send a required Financial aid thing + a whole host of others that i couldn’t afford. I really couldn’t ask my mom to put her fortnight’s worth of pay and grocery money and bills money for that. So in the end i took a little money and paid for the application to a state u and i now attend there. It isn’t really a matter of setting my sights low as much as setting them firmly on my nose and being realistic. But i don’t really dwell on it or regret it or anything, nor am i looking for a pity party, just stating the facts. Plus we are apparently a top research school so that’s a bonus :D
    P.S. I also require million dollar glasses and lens cuz my eyesight is muy horrible, so that was another monetary factor as well.
    P.S.S. abt the College Board charging me money, I did ask both them and the scholarship but they declined to waive the fees.

  • Britt

    I agree with Rue as well. You are correct in that this case has ramifications for non-blacks, but I disagree with your conclusions. Compared to their percentage of the general population, Asians and Asian-Americans are disproportionately over-represented at quite a few college campuses. UC Berkeley, UC Irvine, UCLA, Cal Tech, MIT, and Stanford are just a few examples. In 2000, while 15.5% of Americans overall held a bachelor’s degree, 25.2% of Asian-Americans held a bachelor’s degree.

    Also, Asians and Asian-Americans are not a monolith. Sure, I’ll admit that many people think of the model minority myth that you touch on in your comment, but this stereotype is damaging in that it glosses over the experiences of a variety of groups who have different languages, cultures, and histories. In a study looking at Asian-American children, KaYing Yang noted that certain groups, such as Southeast Asians (Vietnamese, Laotians, Cambodians), may have a harder time overcoming barriers such as discrimination, prejudice, language, etc, because these obstacles have been completely ignored by policy makers in light of the “model minority” myth.

    Furthermore, the SAT is not an intelligence test, it is a test based on how well you retain the information you learned during high school. It irks me when people equate the SAT with “smartness/intelligence”. A person who did poorly in high school (I’ll admit that this could be the result of a lack of drive) could be coached to do well on the SAT with the proper training.

    Realize that the SAT is simply one part of the entire package.

    -A black girl who did better than 1100

  • Rue

    Also thanks a lot for this. my mistakes will certainly aid my younger brother who is more disciplined than me.

  • Concerned Citizen

    A touching story, and I wish you the best from here on out.

    In fairness, the story didn’t really have much to do with this claim, to which I was responding: “I graduated 29/393 kids and made a 1890 on my SAT and never even applied to a top or middle school cause i knew my grades weren’t great.”

  • LaNubiana

    Hi Rue,

    Completely off topic but I responded to your question from yesterday on the AfriCom issues. You should check it out.

  • ?!?

    @Concerned Citizen – I agree that it doesn’t add much to the discussion because her score was lower, but her score was not that much lower, and she didn’t apply to UT which is a very good school. Also she was valedictorian and had a better GPA. Her score was probably perfectly acceptable to go to whatever school she went to. Abigail should have headed on over to another school after she didn’t make the cut before she started whining. If she weren’t mediocre which is what she was, maybe I would care, but she didn’t make the cut. If the author had gotten accepted into UT with her score, you would be whining, but if Abigail had gone, you wouldn’t care. And that’s why I say it’s nothing but whining that I won’t care about until you all start to address how white women have benefitted and still do from AA or legacy students or athletes and musicians with subpar scores or how white kids get accepted into Ivy League schools over smarter Asian kids. You all don’t care about AA when it’s your daughters getting accepted with subpar scores. But when a black person who may show more potential because of a good GPA and extra-curriculars gets accepted, you cry reverse racism! You only care because you dream up this scenario where an undeserving drug dealer took this poor, innocent girl’s spot. You probably make him a woman beater and everything. Lol!

    I mean I just can’t even believe you all are on this article arguing that a white woman should have gotten Affirmative Action! And because she didn’t get it, she gets to whine about not getting her way.

    Lolz!!!!!! That is too funny. And that is why this case is too funny. She’s fighting what against the system that she actually needed to get in!!!! Oh I forgot, you all think AA is only for black folks. Lol.

  • Rue

    Saw it and I liked your points and reasoning. Just know that Blacks in the US are wide awake (well some of us are) and won’t take recolonization of Africa rolling over and lying down. Thanks, and off to read more comments crushing this Fisher Chick :)

  • Rue

    “I am not here to bash Bennet College”
    Well I am here to bash you: ur a d0uche!

  • s.c.

    1680 > 1180

    But maybe indignation and straw-man arguments make numbers hard to understand.

    If you are saying 388 per section is the average, then 1180 is well within the realm of being a complete score. And we are given no reason to believe it’s not. Your inferences are terrible.

    You lose all your merit in your baffling lines.

  • Chloe

    Actually, Abigail fisher is 22 years old, which means that she took the SAT out of 2400, because it was changed in March of 2005. Fisher would have taken her test in 2007 as a junior. Therefore the author still has more merit based on SAT than she does. Also, I’d like to point out that UT has an average acceptance score of 1860 (according to collegeboard), not 1200.

  • ?!?

    I think the 1180 is out of 1600 whereas the 1680 is out of 2400.

    So Abigail does have a higher score than the author, but the point is it is not that much huger, and maybe Abigail should have gone to another school. I mean the author didn’t apply to UT, so it doesn’t matter if her score is less than Fisher’s. Fisher should have applied to a school like Bennett College I guess because her score is close to the author’s.

    I don’t know why people think because the author’s score is less then that means her letter is crap. Everything still holds. I think the author was comparing 1680 and 1180 from two different scales, but even if you think the author is mediocre that makes Fisher only slightly less mediocre. Since the author is suing to go to UT or “pulling the race card” like you all like to accuse all the time, it doesn’t matter. What matters to me is that this girl’s score is close to the author’s who you think is mediocre, but she and you all think that she should have been accepted to UT one of the best schools in the country.

    Maybe she should have tried Texas A&M which is a really good school, but 1180 is low for that school as well I think.

  • shans99

    I think the poster was pointing out that Abigail’s 1180 is just a M/V score, while the writer’s 1680 was obviously M/V/W (since on a math/verbal score alone, a perfect score would be 1600). And the poster was saying the average *for Bennet College* is 388 per section, and it is therefore not a very illustrious institution. (For comparison’s sake, the average SAT at UT is 1844–above 600 on each section; the average at Harvard is roughly 2200–actually a bit higher–which means average score per section is above 730.)

  • shans99

    David, you’re not a former alum. You’re an alum for life. You’re a former student.

  • ?!?

    @shans99 – It wouldn’t matter if the author’s institution was the worst school in the country. She obviously qualified to get in whereas Fisher did not. The author didn’t argue that she should be able to get in at UT. She was saying that her score is better which it is not. That doesn’t change her letter really. It just means maybe she shouldn’t brag about having a better score because she doesn’t.

  • [email protected]

    So, wait! You’re suggesting that someone with an exceptionally high academic record should never choose to attend a Historically Black College, even if they are…gasp!…historically black?
    Wait! What?

  • GeekMommaRants

    Honey Boo Boo goes to college. The author is brilliant and succinct thank you!!

  • ?!?

    I think schools such as UT in certain majors especially STEM fields only look at math and verbal and ignore writing. So a person will take all three sections, but they only look at two. So the score that they are concerned with is out of 1600 even though your entire score is out of 2400. I took the GRE, and I am in a STEM field. Universities I applied to were only interested in math and verbal even though there is a writing portion.

  • Chloe

    it doesn’t change the fact that her score is still 1180. If they’re only concerned with the math and verbal sections shes averaging around a 800, which still doesn’t make much of a cut.

  • bonitakriolaKriola

    This case doesn’t only affect UT, it is in the Supreme Court of the United States, that means that it is mandatory authority for all of the courts in the whole country, it affects everyone. Their decision will be used to regulate the admission systems of all state universities.

    Also, socio-economic status does not negate white privilege, if the admission criteria is pushed towards a socio-economic criteria we still have the same problem, maybe an even worse problem. There are middle class Blacks that still have to deal with the barriers of institutional racism, they still have to fight through a system that is not made for them, they simply have more tools than their low-income counterpart. Beyond that, there are more poor whites than poor blacks (number wise) so essentially it would help them out more than poor blacks, because again, socio-economic status does not negate white privilege. Diversity is more than skin color, its also point of view and we need varied points of view.

    Coming from a state university that had only 2.8% Blacks and 11% Latinos when the demographic of the state was 9% Black and over 40% Latino I am very worried!

  • Sam

    To attend Graduate school at any university, is a great accomplishment. Many people can’t even boast a Bachelors Degree. I wouldn’t say that she’s foolish or less qualified. Abigail is just simply a white girl who is complaining because she didn’t get her way. It’s comparable to a black person not being motivated in life because people are going to discriminate. Everyone just needs to stop complaining and this immature girl needs to learn how to deal with rejection. Oh damn, my white privilege didn’t work this time.

  • shans99

    Chloe, you’re not getting it. We’re saying the released SAT score for Abigail is JUST THE MATH AND VERBAL, ie 1180/1600 rather than 1180/2400. We’re presuming this based on the following assertion that the average SAT score for SAT is in the 1200s, which is only true for the M/V score, not the M/V/W. So Abigail’s score is still not good enough for UT, but also better than the author’s, who maybe shouldn’t have thrown her score into the mix.

  • Chloe

    Ohh ok, makes more sense now. I actually looked it up, you’re right xD
    http://www.utexas.edu/vp/irla/Documents/02.%20Amended%20Complaint.pdf

  • Chika

    No. I’m a Columbia Lion!

  • Brittany Brathwaite

    Great Letter. I think that people find it easy to say that they we were a case of “reverse racism” (whatever that is), because they are not willing to look into their own history and lives and how they have benefitted from un-named white privilege. They fail to even look into the number of students that look just like them that had low scores, but gained admission into the school.

    The United States was built on affirmation action, which mostly benefitted whites. White women like Abigail have benefitted from so called affirmative action more than any group in this country.The U.S. has been giving racial preference to whites since the beginning of time. If you want to talk policy look at the 1790 Naturalization Act, that allowed only “free whites” to become naturalized citizens. Or the landmark Social Security Act of 1935, that explicitly excluded agricultural workers and domestic servants from participating in the program. Wonder who had those jobs? The Wagner Act of 1935, that gave unions the power to exclude non-whites, and keep them from union protections and other benefits such as healthcare (well no wonder people hate the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010). How about one of the most blatant discriminatory programs, The Fair Housing Act and the original GI Bill, which gave whites the opportunity to get loans for homes (many whose descendants still reside on that property today, guess that will determine your high school), or access to institutions of higher education, which sent white GIs returning from service into colleges at record numbers.

    So if you want to cry affirmative action, be ready to peel back all the layers of “racial discrimination” that the United States had embedded in its policies that people, WHITE people, are still benefitting from this very day!

  • http://www.facebook.com/DoveHigh Stephanie High

    There will not cease to be a racial divide in this country until we stop acknowledging it. By checking our race on census forms, we are admitting that what race we are matters when it in fact does not. I do not believe that applications should have race, gender or marital status on them, as they serve no purpose but to alienate people into different “groups”. We should all be one group of people, we should all simply be Americans.

  • http://erratic-assassin-presents.blogspot.com/ sbeale

    Fisher’s score is probably based on the combined score rather than the overall score out of 2400. She took the SAT after it was changed to the 2400 scale so this makes sense and schools ignored that dumb writing section.

  • Brittany

    This is my favorite response to the whiny white girl. Seriously. Making me look bad. I can at least admit when something is MY FAULT instead of crying ‘reverse racism’ bullshit. Like. How dare she, poor girl, have to actually COMPETE with minorities? Gasp!

  • the real paul

    The irony is that ivy league universities are affirmative action for people who don’t need it – rich students and brainy students.

    People who are already advantaged by having money or by dint of having won the genetic lottery (being brainy) get the best opportunities.

    Hardly any merit in that regardless if the beneficiary is black white or yellow.

    It’s another deception played on the masses to keep power and privilege concentrated in the same few hands, because all affirmative action – as it’s currently practiced – does is create a small tier of privileged non-whites, and increases the number of -

    privileged white women.

    Opportunities for the majority of blacks remain limited, but now they can use AA to say that we have equal opportunity in education.

    Affirmative action is very cheap way to “amend past wrongs”, and worse still is that it does no such thing, rather, it entrenches the idea some people deserve better than others because they are innately superior.

    No

    we need something much more comprehensive than AA.

  • Paul

    “socio-economic status does not negate white privilege”

    What does negate your notion of “white privilege” then? Or is your notion the essence of non-science, i.e., is not falsifiable? I would simply and otherwise suggest that if resources for the school have some correlation with student achievement, and available resources do have such a correlation, then perhaps in relation to the matter of education, poor white folk enjoy no such thing as your notion of “white privilege”.

    “this conversation shows that ‘post racial’ is a crack dream…”

    Absolutely.

    Lastly, and by the way, the apparent fatal flaw in the University of Texas’ admissions process is that it already automatically accepts the top 10% of each high school’s graduating class. Accordingly, folks of all shades and stripes should find themselves their shade and stripe well represented at the University of Texas without any need for further consideration of the matter of race.

  • someone who went to UT…

    As someone who went to UT, and got in the year before Abigail Fisher (in 2007), I just wanted to note that it is not easy to get in. I was not in the top 10%, and was offered admission through the now defunct summer program. I got an 1850 on my SAT, and had a 3.6, and went to a really good high school in Richardson, TX. She really just doesn’t understand that she just didn’t make the cut. And she only played the cello and soccer?? Ugh.. I was in choir and competed for all region and all state choir, I did art, and did an AP 2D design portfolio, took numerous AP tests and received 5′s and 4′s and a few 3′s, was on NHS and was an officer, did chess club, was a Girl Scout and received my Gold Award, and was very active in my church, etc etc etc. I am a black girl, but I still barely made the cut and got into the summer admission program. When will they learn…

  • the real paul

    this guys comment proves perfectly illustrates my point.

  • Jason

    The writer may be correct in that Abigail didn’t deserve to be admitted based purely on merit, but it goes on a tangent better suited for a sociology class than an admissions process. It should be noted that I don’t disagree with the prevalence of “white privilege”, yet I still feel that race should be absent from admissions consideration only because real people (maybe Abigail) do suffer when someone less qualified, regardless of race, takes their spot on a college roster.

    As mentioned, does this article actually mention all the students that were admitted at all levels in the college? If it does, and it shows all other students had higher indexes, then it appears there was no wrong committed. But, if there were some students that had a higher index where race was the factor that pushed them over Abigail, then that is simply foul. It is as simple as that.

    The whole idea of using one’s color of skin or one’s national origin to populate a student body is completely absurd. While many groups have faced severe discrimination in the past, I would say that black and native americans have had it the worst. But this isn’t how we select categories for affirmative action. We do so by determining which group is underrepresented. This explains why a group that has faced enormous discrimination such as Chinese americans do not benefit from affirmative action.

    A group that actually benefits from affirmative action is hispanics. Hispanics are people from a Spanish speaking nation (other than Spain). Essentially, you can be of any skin color and as long as you or your ancestors come from one of over 15 spanish speaking nations, you qualify for affirmative action assistance. Nevermind that most countries such as Argentina/Uruguay are white. Even the wealthy people with servants (such as the ones in the spanish language soap operas) can receive the same assistance as the child of a Mexican landscaper. That is some REAL white privilege.

    Basically, affirmative action is a sensible program only if it is based on something meaningful, such as social class. Please eliminate the silly racial categories (where Michael Jordan’s children benefit) and install real reasons for assistance. This way, we can help poor children of all races and backgrounds achieve and create greater social mobility. One may argue that many black and hispanic students will benefit anyway, so this fulfills the purpose in a more equitable and inclusive manner.

  • http://gravatar.com/damalatina damalatina

    About the “people who work and teach at the school get presedence to send their children there” is not true. I’ve worked for 25 yrs at UT, my oldest son applied and was not admitted directly, but was indirectly under the CAP. He was at LASA, which is one of the toughest schools (magnet) programs in the country and is yearly one of the top high schools in the US. But it is so highly competitive because very bright kids attend, so he didn’t make the 10% cut. However, he is about to graduate from another university and is applying to graduate school. That being said, we know admission is highly competitive here. Oh, we’re Hispanic, btw and no, he was not admitted even though he is a minority…lol…you don’t always get what you want…this young woman needs to learn that. As a WOMAN with a degree? she should know that she has benefitted from Affirmative Action…but I don’t think she learned this in her government classes that I’m sure she must have taken somewhere…

  • Vulkan He’Stan

    Incorrect. I said that her credentials are irrelevant because the ruling is about whether universities should continue to use race as a criteria. Whether it grows out of entitlement or vengeance or whatnot is immaterial, since again, Abby’s character isn’t what is on trial.

    Let’s say it was a white student or an Asian student who barely missed the cut for top 10% and did have people with lesser credentials admitted in place. Would you still be complaining then?

  • Vulkan He’Stan

    Difference being most would agree that being poor and thus having access to opportunities like science fairs or math clubs or after-school activities is a thing that prevents you from competing fairly, whereas being black or hispanic or a woman is not.

    It also means you get the support of, say, first-gen immigrants from Europe who get no help despite/because they are white.

  • Vulkan He’Stan

    P1: Premature conclusion. Walk into any corporate office today and you’ll notice that while the CEOs and upper management is still mostly white, middle to employee level are far more diverse. What do you think happens in a decade or so when the upper management retires?

    P2: You do realize the scope/effects of a suit changes as it gets appealed up to the SC, right? Her initial argument was that she would have gotten in but for race, yes. The harm, as stated in the oral argument, was lack of access to equal treatment. This is a question to which her credentials have zero bearing, Let’s say you have a white or an Asian student who barely fell out of top 10% and you could produce at least a fair amount of students with lesser credentials. Would you still be saying the same? Or let’s say you have a jewelry store that sells superexpensive trinkets that will only sell to white people. Do you say I don’t get to sue because I couldn’t afford it anyway?

  • Vulkan He’Stan

    No it is not. Plaintiff’s argument is that the harm is denial of equal treatment. Credentials has nothing to do with that. Although I would have preferred it if she did have better credentials since it would mean the discussion would stop being derailed by articles like this one.

    Privilege? I am an IT guy myself, so excuse me if I am dismissive of the soft studies. One of my friends growing up was the son of first-gen immigrants from Poland. What kind of privilege, exactly do they have? I myself am Asian (you know, the minority that has next to zero programs to help them and don’t even count as a minority for aff ac purposes). I went to the same high school as Abby, in fact, and graduated from UT. What privilege do I have? All I see is that “privilege” is a concept that’s overly broad, and perhaps the activist community would like to fine-tune the philosophy by which they criticize society.

  • Vulkan He’Stan

    See below reply to Eric regarding my friend the son of first-gen immigrants from Poland. He and his parents have oppressed you and yours how exactly?

  • Raymond

    Sorry but your classification of Latinos is completely inaccurate. Latinos from Argentina aren’t white, they are Latino or Argentinian. No one in Argentina calls themselves white because that’s not what they are. When they come to this country they aren’t treated as if they are white either. Once someone recognizes an accent or sees a last name, the prejudice comes flooding in. Ignoring the fact that race plays into someone’s experience and everyday life is cruel. Michael Jordan’s children should benefit from living in a society where they constantly have to face implicit racism and people like you who are trying to make them invisible.

  • E

    I understand that you are attempting to refute the original comment’s claims about racial superiority (Which was a ridiculous statement to begin with and I am not going to bother giving him the time of day), but this entire comment is an exaggeration and generalization of the Asian-American population as well.

    Your first two points are fairly valid. Many Eastern cultures are group-oriented and concerned with the community’s appearance, and education is an extremely important issue for many families.

    However, Asia is a huge continent. Most of the generalizations about the “model minority” come from upper-class families who immigrate to the U.S. for better academic and job opportunities. But lower-class families, especially from countries like Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, etc. and people who sought refuge in the U.S. because of mistreatment and poor conditions in their home country…they don’t fall under this category.

    Since you used your own personal example of a Chinese boy who had his parents pay for extra classes, here’s mine: I am a first-generation Chinese-American, my family immigrated to the U.S. from Vietnam following the Vietnam War. My mom raised me as a single mother in a low-income neighborhood and did not have the resources to shuffle me from extra classes or extracurricular activities. We’re not all that lucky.

    (And your point about “beating him” despite not taking extra classes? Was that necessary?)

    And finally, the statement about Asian students cheating and getting away with it…

    Students who have the means to do so cheat because they are lazy or privileged and think that the easiest way is the best way. Generalizing Asian students as being more prone to cheating because they believe they can abuse their model minority myth is absolutely insulting to those of us who have had to fight against the consequences of that stereotype.

    But this is all derailing from the original issue at hand. I’m not here to play the “Whose life was harder” game, because many of us are fighting against institutionalized racism and privilege in our daily lives. As an Asian-American student, I support affirmative action but I also hope that such decisions will come with great thought and consideration of the categories they use to describe each group as well as a recognition that this support does not start & end at the application process. We need to keep our students in school and provide the resources necessary to help everyone succeed, starting from Kindergarten through university. You can’t start people on uneven playing fields and then throw them into the same stadium at the end of the day.

  • Chika

    …I’ll have what she’s smoking *sarcasm*

  • Holly

    I would like you to write all of my arguments. Love this.

  • Pingback: Geeking Out | Geekquality

  • Zaza

    Every year (in England) when the university offers are made there is some kid in the newspapers whining ‘I have 5 billion A grades and didn’t get into the university of my choice it’s so unfair!’

    The fact is most of the top 50 universities, definitely top 30, will be massively oversubscribed with students. When you’re talking about the top ten universities that these students get denied from, for every place there are probably 100′s of A grade students all with amazing volunteering jobs, sport memberships and extracurriculars, fighting for that one place.

    Maybe you didn’t get in because even if you have amazing grades, when it came to separating you from those with identical grades, the interviewer thought you were arrogant, dull and not suited to the university? Entitled people like this will learn in the real world it takes more than just your grades to be successful at a job interview for example, a person is more than that.

    Some people think they are owed the world because they aced some tests. Well done, but so did 10s of thousands of other kids, suck it up and apply next year/somewhere else. No you don’t get everything you want in life, that doesn’t mean it’s black people’s fault! Ridiculous.

  • ?!?

    Latino is not a race. It is an ethnicity grouping people from Latin America. Argentina was only second to the US for European immigration, and the majority of Argentinians are white. They are white Latinos.

    Argentina was not very populated before Europeans arrived unlike Mexico, and Italians and Spanish immigrants began to move to Argentina. Racial makeup of Latin American countries varies. Mexico has Amerindians, whites, and mestizos (mixed). The Dominican Republic and Brazil have blacks, whites, and mixed people because of slavery. Countries like Argentina and Chile have a large white population because of European immigration. Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru have significant Amerindian populations.

  • Kim

    The problem with your logic is encapsulated in the word I’ve capitalized from your statement here: “…yet I still feel that race should be absent from admissions consideration only because real people (maybe Abigail) do suffer when someone less qualified, regardless of race, takes THEIR spot on a college roster.”

    Your choice of words betrays the view that the spot belonged to someone like Abigail, who clearly wasn’t qualified herself, and that if someone else got it, an injustice was done. That’s entitlement!

    Absent any consideration of race, colleges would have even more dismal levels of diversity than they have now. That is simply unacceptable. Shifting the focus to socio-economic status alone wouldn’t change lack of diversity on college campuses.

  • kay

    …soooooo, only the black students admitted took her spot? not any of the white students who were admitted? hmmm….go figure

  • Vero

    Being a Floridian as well and a recent high school graduate, the fact that white people are still saying they didn’t get into UF or FSU because of affirmative action is even more frustrating! It’s crazy that lots of people still don’t know Jeb Bush got rid of affirmative action at Florida educational institutions well over 10 years ago! A white classmate of mine complained that he didn’t get into UF because of affirmative action while a good portion of the Hispanic and black students were admitted. He would have qualified for legacy because both his parents attended UF, but he made all C’s and did nothing productive outside of school. All the Hispanic and black students made all or mostly A’s and were very involved in organizations in and outside of school. When he tried to play that card, I had to let him know that they got in because they worked their asses off for the last four years while he sat on his and if he was going to blame something, to at least blame something that existed. White Florida students, especially, need to learn a little history and stop blaming minorities for their failures.

  • http://www.qwocmap.org QWOCMAP San Francisco

    totally…and he forgot to clue you into the memo that all white folks would be smoking the crack and living the crack dream of white privilege the day that he wrote you.

  • http://aishaamuda.wordpress.com aishaamuda

    I know you truly believe this, but you really need to know it is completely ridiculous. You believe that by not talking about race, people will forget that racial prejudice and animus exists? This is absurd. There are racist people in this country or at least people who still harbor racist beliefs and attitudes. Those things won’t go away if unaddressed. And we all are common in that we are Americans, but the fundamental point you are missing is that some of us became Americans by force and host of other violent and horrific ways. Not every family got here in the same way. And while this is true of most countries of the world, history directly informs what is happening today. You can’t separate the history of this fairly new nation from as far back to its inception to even the things that are happening today. The legacy of those actions persist. Race does matter. Please don’t be obtuse. To assert that it doesn’t is cruel because it discounts the real experience of racial minorities who experience discrimination because of color every single day.

  • nona

    Did someone link this article to Stormfront?

  • the real paul

    @qwocmap

    Not sure what point you’re making but it’s irrelevant to me whether some whites feel they don’t benefit from white privilege. In fact, white privilege is also irrelevant to me.

    I don’t need to to found a claim for equal opportunity on white privilege, all I need is – the reality of racism.

  • the real paul

    exactly they all come out of the backwoods whenever AA is mentioned.

  • Kara

    I think this article should be used or at least read by the Supreme Court. As a white woman, I applied to the college of my dreams and where my mother attended. I was denied even with a much higher GPA and SAT score than Ms. Fisher. I went to my 3rd choice university and meet the love of my life my now husband. I am so thankful for that rejection because I have had a happier and more fulfilling life because of it. I didn’t make my rejection a “national” issues nor should Fisher.

  • Butters

    Dude a 1680 is a pretty lousy SAT score to be getting you into “every” college you applied to. Unless you didn’t apply anywhere particularly selective.

  • TO THE AUTHOR:

    Abigail’s score of 1180 does not include her writing score:

    “UT Austin did not consider the writing section in its undergraduate admissions decision for the 2008 incoming freshman class.
    12. On the first occasion that Ms. Fisher took the SAT, she scored a 540 on the critical reading portion of the exam and an 630 on the math portion of the exam for a total of 1170. On the second occasion, she scored a 500 on the critical reading portion of the exam and a 680 on the math portion of the exam for a total of 1180.”

    http://www.utexas.edu/vp/irla/Documents/02.%20Amended%20Complaint.pdf

    On the other hand, your score of 1680 most definitely DID include your writing section, as it is impossible to get above 1600 on two sections.

  • Sam

    okay. let’s see if I can add anything to this rant.

    a) The author seems to be confusing the individual plaintiff in this case with the issue at large. I agree that Fisher’s admittance was probably not affected by affirmative action. Her scholastic achievements were what kept her out of UT, not African American people. However, just because Affirmative Action didn’t work against Fisher, doesn’t mean it doesn’t work against other white applicants. College admittance is a zero sum game. There are only so many spots and the whole point of Affirmative Action is to make sure race is a factor in putting minorities in those spots. Because these spots are taken by minorities, white people are excluded. Arguing that Affirmative Action works in any other way is pointless because the end goal, increasing the education of minorities, can only be achieved in this way if other objective factors (test scores, gpa) are lower than their white counterparts. So, the issue is not whether Fisher is exhibiting White Privilege, but rather if any person should be given privilege because they are a certain race.

    b) A completely false statement:

    “If affirmative action is gutted and substituted with “neutral-based admissions,” institutions will have the option to deny students access to the educational American Dream based on their ethnic background.”

    Absolutely not. Not only is that unconstitutional, but considering many institutions of higher learning issued amicus briefs supporting Affirmative Action and are generally left leaning, it is extremely unlikely that they would now suddenly deny African Americans because of their race. Equating losing a privileged status with attaining a detrimental status is illogical.

    c) The irony that the Personal Achievement factor would include race

    I understand that the author did not create the Personal Achievement factor, but she seems to indicate her acceptance that it is indeed a personal achievement to be of a certain race. In fact, race is the opposite of a personal achievement. It takes zero personal effort or skill to be born of a certain race. Unlike extracurricular activities or leadership roles, being a certain race takes no skill, work ethic, or choice. Achievements are based on a choice to pursue a certain course of action. UT’s definition of achievement is the only standard I can think of that would recognize an innate and involuntary characteristic as an achievement. It is like saying “Congratulations on being right-handed…way to go!”

    d) Something I thought was funny

    The author is pretty rude all around to Fisher in this piece, In particular, she reveals that Fisher scored an 1180/1600 on her SAT. The author then, quite proudly and haughtily, announces that she received a 1680/2400 on her SAT. Well, an 1180/1600 is approximately 76th percentile. But a 1680/2400 is approximately 70th percentile. Maybe the author should check the true score before simply writing that her number was bigger.

    Alright, I’m out.

  • Sam

    okay. let’s see if I can add anything to this rant.

    a) The author seems to be confusing the individual plaintiff in this case with the issue at large. I agree that Fisher’s admittance was probably not affected by affirmative action. Her scholastic achievements were what kept her out of UT, not African American people. However, just because Affirmative Action didn’t work against Fisher, doesn’t mean it doesn’t work against other white applicants. College admittance is a zero sum game. There are only so many spots and the whole point of Affirmative Action is to make sure race is a factor in putting minorities in those spots. Because these spots are taken by minorities, white people are excluded. Arguing that Affirmative Action works in any other way is pointless because the end goal, increasing the education of minorities, can only be achieved in this way if other objective factors (test scores, gpa) are lower than their white counterparts. So, the issue is not whether Fisher is exhibiting White Privilege, but rather if any person should be given privilege because they are a certain race.

    b) A completely false statement:

    “If affirmative action is gutted and substituted with “neutral-based admissions,” institutions will have the option to deny students access to the educational American Dream based on their ethnic background.”

    Absolutely not. Not only is that unconstitutional, but considering many institutions of higher learning issued amicus briefs supporting Affirmative Action and are generally left leaning, it is extremely unlikely that they would now suddenly deny African Americans because of their race. Equating losing a privileged status with attaining a detrimental status is illogical.

    c) The irony that the Personal Achievement factor would include race

    I understand that the author did not create the Personal Achievement factor, but she seems to indicate her acceptance that it is indeed a personal achievement to be of a certain race. In fact, race is the opposite of a personal achievement. It takes zero personal effort or skill to be born of a certain race. Unlike extracurricular activities or leadership roles, being a certain race takes no skill, work ethic, or choice. Achievements are based on a choice to pursue a certain course of action. UT’s definition of achievement is the only standard I can think of that would recognize an innate and involuntary characteristic as an achievement. It is like saying “Congratulations on being right-handed…way to go!”

    d) Something I thought was funny

    The author is pretty rude all around to Fisher in this piece, In particular, she reveals that Fisher scored an 1180/1600 on her SAT. The author then, quite proudly and haughtily, announces that she received a 1680/2400 on her SAT. Well, an 1180/1600 is approximately 76th percentile. But a 1680/2400 is approximately 70th percentile. Maybe the author should check the true score before simply writing that her number was bigger.

    Alright, I’m out

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    “the end goal, increasing the education of minorities, can only be achieved in this way if other objective factors (test scores, gpa) are lower than their white counterparts”

    pure racist bull…..it is well known that AA with similar or better qualifications than whites are denied opportunity.

    the goal of affirmative action is to allow some qualified blacks to get some opportunity some of the time.

    with the exception of justice thomas most AA are more than qualified. it is the standard ploy of the racist to cast all blacks as looking for a handout.

    we are just looking for our due.

  • Diane

    I suppose you have no value for intellectual pursuit. Please correct that mess full of syntax errors and try again.

  • Diane

    …And we should all hold hands and dance around magical unicorns while we float up to a candy filled sky. When you’re ready to re enter the real world let me know.

  • B

    Furthermore, Bennett College has a 6 year graduation rate of 39% and and average SAT score of 700-850 (omitting writing). Please don’t brag about how great you are when you don’t know what you are talking about. In contrast, the median 50% SAT scores at UT are 1120-1380, putting Abigail in the bottom half but well within an admissible range. Obviously that wouldn’t guarantee her admission or even mean she should have been admitted, and has nothing to do with whether or not the case has any business going to the supreme court (I don’t think it does, it will set a horrible precedent no matter the outcome). Regardless, you (the author) should probably check your facts before insulting someone’s intelligence like this, it’s very rude.

  • Richard Sendak

    This case ultimately has nothing to do with this entitled little princess and her silly little tantrum at having been rejected from UT despite her mediocre scores. This case will likely answer this question: is it appropriate for black and Hispanic applicants to be held to a lower academic standard than white and Asian applicants?

    There’s no denying that an achievement gap exists. It’s well documented. It is not, however, well understood. As a group, black and Hispanic students score lower, on average, than their white and Asian counterparts on the SAT and other metrics used by colleges to evaluate applicants’ academic achievement. See below:

    http://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/PICBWGAP.pdf

    Held to the same academic standard, black and Hispanic students would be less likely, on average, to be admitted than white and Asian students and would thus be further underrepresented on college campuses.

  • Jose

    Those of you pointing out that 1680/2400 is less than 1180/1600 are tools. Statistics 101 is an emblem of White Privilege, and therefore it is the responsibility of all socially conscious citizens to shun it. Basic math is a sham that was created by The White Man to oppress and confuse the rest of us. I applaud Evette’s strength in the face of such tyranny. Keep fighting the good fight. Hopefully, our universities will one day be filled with people like you, who reject false notions of long division and proudly proclaim their Personal Achievement of being born with more melanin than the average American. Only then will we truly be the Greatest Nation on Earth.

  • cady

    “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.”

    Um, shouldn’t this sentence read, “the reason you weren’t accepted into the University of Texas had nothing to do with your whiteness”? As it stands, the sentence agrees with Abigail in saying that the reason she was rejected was because she was white! Sorry, I just hate it when an otherwise great riposte is ruined by careless wording…

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    um, what academic standard was GW Bush held to?

  • Richard Sendak

    About the same as a Kennedy.

  • Johnathan

    A 1680 SAT score (including writing) is terrible. You must not have applied to any schools with actual admittance standards…

  • beks

    when did asians get lumped in with whites? in the AA game they are considered people of color. duh.

  • beks

    Stephanie High – you are so out of your league here with your basic, simplistic theories. you should be embarrassed to speak. honestly, it isn’t that you disagree, there are many here who have put forth excellent disagreements to the author – you, however….just, no. go away and read a book.

  • beks

    the ONLY time i agree with you…

  • beks

    ^this!

  • http://www.gmail.com Steveo

    The only way that a person can think that ending affirmative action means a return to Jim Crow-era Mississippi is if that person indeed has such low SAT scores as the author (so low, in fact, that as the other posts here show, she is too dumb even to realize she is dumb and thus brags about them). The better argument would have been “affirmative action is good because it allows even people as intellectually challenged as I am to have a shot at higher education.” We will, then, indulgently overlook the equal protection clause problems with the absence of this same opportunity for Stupid White People.

  • isolde3

    @?!?

    Abigail did go to another school. She went to LSU, and we don’t know how well she did academically in college, just like we don’t know about Evette’s grades in high school. The fact that Evette was a valedictorian at Bennett is wonderful, but LSU is a much bigger pond with far more competition. So, trying to use Evette’s college grades and the fact that she was a valedictorian against Abigail is dubious. Evette should’ve never taken it there, but she did, opening herself up to this type of scrutiny. Many of the points in this letter would have stood on their own merit without the inclusion of that SAT score comparison or any of Evette’s academic’s information. That score snafu was sloppy and calls Evette’s credibility into question as someone who’s presented herself as being knowledgeable and understanding of the nuances of the case. There are all these quotes, facts, allusions etc. to the case in this article from what Abigail said to the NYT to what the UT Austin lawyer said about Abigail’s chances of admission, but it didn’t dawn on Evette that Abigail’s score was based on the 1600 point scale, even after Evette pointed out that UT is a prestigious school where applicants have an average SAT score of 1200?

    Whoever edited this piece before running it on this site should’ve caught that discrepancy as well as the other hyperbolic messiness (“1180 is WAY below UT’s average . . . of 1200”), especially since Evette was going to be clowning somebody (Abigail) on what “she should’ve known.” That type of error flies in the face of the article’s tone and is a convenient distraction for those looking to ignore the article’s larger theme.

  • Ashley B

    “…race is the opposite of a personal achievement. It takes zero personal effort or skill to be born of a certain race. Unlike extracurricular activities or leadership roles, being a certain race takes no skill, work ethic, or choice. Achievements are based on a choice to pursue a certain course of action.”

    This statement is a perfect example of un-examined white privilege. Of course it is not an achievement to be born of a certain race. It IS, however, an achievement to have overcome the obstacles put in place by a historically racist country to achieve academically. Presumably, white students have not had to face racist teachers, lowered access to good schools, living in more dangerous neighborhoods, being more likely to be living in poverty, etc. Obviously every black student has not encountered these issues, but they are statistically more likely to have overcome issues such as these in order to succeed in high school.

    It makes sense that for the “overcoming difficulty based on race” score white students get a “0.” Then, in their application essays, they have the opportunity to write in about their other achievements and gain points for cello playing and volunteering at old folks’ homes, and beating cancer and whatever else they have achieved.

    I’m not saying that I agree with everything the author says here, but I can tell you that as a black woman who earned an MA, growing up black and pursuing higher education was an achievement and the result of my skills and work ethic. I made the choice to go to college, I was the first in my family to make such a choice. I made the choice to stick out going to a school where I only knew 2 other black kids on campus. Can you imagine feeling comfortable (let along succeeding) anywhere where only two other people “look like you”? It took skills and work ethic to figure out how to fill out the FAFSA and apply for student loans alone, because no one in my family had ever done so before. It was an achievement to pursue higher education, when even at a very liberal university I was met with more racism and ignorance than I ever could have imagined. Where I had teachers ask me to teach the class, because they felt ill-equipped to address the racist comments of my peers in the classroom. Can you imagine continuing to show up to class week after week to have students make racist statements against you, while the teacher does nothing about it? Could you imagine getting an “A” in that class? I would call that an achievement.

    I achieve something every single day I encounter someone like you with unchecked white privilege and manage to make it to the end of the day without yelling at them for being so willingly blind to the hard work of others.

    The good news is, I often do make it through the day. And in college my presence (and the presence of my TWO black friends) did help some white students learn to recognize privilege. Hopefully those white students whose personal and academic achievements are not high enough to “beat out” a student of color with the SAME academic achievement who perhaps gets a boost in the personal achievement side for managing to grow up in racist society and still managing to achieve will understand that growing up white was never supposed to give them a leg up in the first place.

  • Yaya

    What the author as well as some of the readers are forgetting is that affirmative action was not only for people of color but also for women! So she’s arguing against something that assisted a lot of white women into academia! Wow….

  • Richard Sendak

    “Hopefully those white students whose personal and academic achievements are not high enough to “beat out” a student of color with the SAME academic achievement who perhaps gets a boost in the personal achievement side”

    It’s not a minor boost given to otherwise academically similar applicants. It’s a major boost. Take medical school acceptance rates, for example. The acceptance rates below are for students with 3.0-3.19 GPAs and 27-29 MCAT scores:

    Asian: 12.6%
    White: 21.0%
    Black: 71.5%

    Black applicants with otherwise similar scores are over 5 times more likely to be accepted than Asian applicants and over 3 times more likely to be accepted than white applicants.

    Source: https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html

  • http://twitter.com/CliftonDuncanIV Clifton Duncan (@CliftonDuncanIV)

    I’m in the middle of reading Michelle Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow”; in it, she makes a VERY persuasive argument, backed by sources and references to past SCOTUS rulings, that the Supreme Court, in our “colorblind” society, typically rules AGAINST plaintiffs that charge racial discrimination–this is, of course, if such cases ever reach the court AT ALL–the cases that Alexander cited were the result of severe miscarriages of the criminal (in)justice system.

    Let me clarify: the SCotUS has, historically, ruled against MINORITY plaintiffs.

    The fact that this white woman can have this case seriously considered by the SCOTUS at ALL speaks volumes about the value of whiteness in our society:

    When one considers that Troy Davis–an ACTUAL victim of injustice–had to be hours from execution, and the subject of intense media attention, in order to have his case heard, it’s very telling that all this girl had to do was paint herself a white victim of racism in order to get to Washington.

    It’s such a naked double-standard, all the more despicable when one considers that, as has been noted, white women are the prime beneficiaries of Affirmative Action.

  • Richard Sendak

    Asian applicants do not benefit from race-based admission policies. On average, Asian students have the highest GPA and SAT scores on campus. They would likely see their representation on campus increase as a result of race-neutral admissions policies.

  • amy

    :) exactly.

  • http://gravatar.com/pocketsizednegro Courtney**

    This article is definitely more thorough and thought-provoking than my open letter to Abigail Fisher, which would be three words long: “Ho sit down.”

  • Tony Winters

    I must ask…so what? Why must diversity as a concept override everything else? The universities should be more focused on education and far less focused on diversity. There should be a hard, black and white, and unambiguous standard for admission…over the line? in, under the line? out. And at no point should race play into it. Period.

  • http://www.facebook.com/X23sexy Wong Chia Chi

    Ugh. This whole thing makes me ill.

  • John Doe

    What logically inconsistent nonsense. If she would have gotten in then it is because of “white privilege,” but if a non-white person with the same credentials gets in because of “race consideration” then it is not because of a “privilege” due to the race-consideration system. You use “privilege” to mean different things based on what race that person is.

  • John Doe

    You scored 1680 on the SAT – is that the three test score with a max of 2400? If so, I don’t see how your score would be that much different from her verbal + quantitative 1180 composite (and possibly lower), but it seems like you’re looking down on her as an academic inferior.

  • hookemhorns

    As a current black student attending UT as an undergraduate, this case makes me sick. The Texas legislature capped the number of top 10% students that UT must accept at 75% of an incoming class, because, due to the popularity of UT, the school had little autonomy accepting many students outside of the top 10%. So, the last 25% of students that the university accepts mainly consists of superb candidates from other states(and countries) to balance the class, and to add another level of diversity. Abigail Fisher was simply an uncompetitive candidate for acceptance in this last 25% of available spots, not because a bunch of unqualified minorities were accepted due to their skin color. Besides, there are 52,000 students at UT and only 6% are black. Her logic is unfounded.

  • Lauren

    This girl is (hopefully) going to look back on this years from now and cringe and cringe. I almost feel sorry for her.
    I really don’t understand that if going to UT was her dream, why didn’t she transfer after a year or so? That’s what I did. I knew that I probably wouldn’t be accepted as a freshman so I chose community college and transfered in after a year. First choice school, first choice major. It’s not impossible.

  • Blair Case

    The author’s asserts that “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.” Abigail would definitely agree, but I suspect this was simply a Freudian slip. The author writes, ” If affirmative action is gutted and substituted with ‘neutral-based admissions,’ institutions will have the option to deny students access to the educational American Dream based on their ethnic background. Abigail, if the Supreme Court issues a verdict in your favor, you will be responsible for pushing this nation backward, into an era when blacks were met with venom at the steps of Ole Miss.” However, a decision in Fisher’s favor not give universities the option to deny admission to students based on their racial or ethnic background. In fact, Abigail is asking the court to ban racial and ethnic discrimination in college admissions. She criticizes Fisher because her her SAT score of 1180 was “below average,” however, SAT scoring has been modified since Fisher took the test in 2007. Her score was above the national average at the time. The author fails to mention, or may not know, that the typical black student receiving a race preference at the University of Texas placed at the 52nd percentile of the SAT while the typical white student placed was the 89th percentile. The author attempts to portray Fisher as an icon of white privilege, but Fisher attended high school that was only 34% white. She filed suit after noticing that minority classmates who had lower test scores and class ranking win addmission to the University of Texas. I doubt the author knows how Abigail scored on the Personal Achievement idex.

  • http://www.employeeessential.com Essential Host

    How quickly we forget!

  • In TOTAL agreement

    I completely agree with the author of this article and couldn’t help but to LITERALLY applaud you while when I was finished reading :) .

    Everything that you said is true. This girl is clearly disillusioned by the notion that the world (particularly her country) owes her something because of the colour of her skin.

    I’m from the Caribbean and I grew up in a country where ‘whites’ have this notion that they’re ‘worth more’ than other racial groups (although they make up the minority on our island).
    I constantly had to deal with being taunted because I was smarter than my white counterparts and it was ridiculous to see the way they reacted negatively toward my success and the accomplishments of other black students. The world is changing now and developing in such a way that every one is getting a chance to prove themselves.

    As my mom would say: “You either step up and stand out or get left behind”. Clearly and unfortunately, Abigail Fisher did NOT step up and, as an obvious result, was left behind.

    It’s a pity that she only saw it fit to stand out for something so utterly stupid that it makes my blood boil. Since when did whites have to worry about being “discriminated against”. Urghh.

    Also, for some reason I can’t help feeling that her parents had a little something to do with the way she handled the rejection. I’m sure that hundreds (if not thousands) of other applicants were rejected but she just HAD to be the only one who reacted in this matter. I honestly cannot see what she expects to gain from this little ‘show’.

    She needs to learn that everybody tries and some of them will fail. Failure is an inevitable part of life. A good character would learn from those failures and keep trying til they succeed. This just proves that not only does she lack the academic requirements but she doesn’t have the attitude fit for a top university like UT.

    Stop being a sore loser -_-

  • Margy Dowzer

    I’m appalled that this is going before the Supreme Court. Thank you for the particulars about this young woman’s mediocre academic record- this should be more widely publicized! But of course, it’s not about qualifications, but entitlement, white privilege, and our sorry history of racism. Sincerely, a 58-year old white woman

  • http://blackbutterflygirl.wordpress.com blackbutterflygirl

    OMG! I applaud you my sister for not only addressing this, but for all your accomplishments thus far! Someone needs to wake up and see that “WE CAN DO IT!”

  • http://www.facebook.com/ohhhmygooddd Kelsey Martin

    Dude, seriously. I got into UT, but I didn’t get into a bunch of other schools that I wanted to go to. Big deal. I went to UT. I wasn’t like ” It must be all the black people, jackin my spots!” I just accepted that there were better qualified applicants who got the spots. This girl makes me so sad. She’s so entitled and she doesn’t even know how selfish she is, and to top it all off she has a bunch of idiots pumping their fists and heralding her as some sort of saviour from the “unfairness” of affirmative action. uggghh people.

  • http://P3RSONaliTY.com Ali Fadlallah

    Love it. Evette, you should correct the following typo so that your intended meaning is not distorted: “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.” Now that you took noteworthy action, we will help you tweet it to the world!

  • kd

    I was refreshed and energized when i read your post. You are the realization of The Dream. You are indeed a special person. It takes a special person with extra-ordinary character to handle the situations you describe with such grace.

  • http://aintstudyingyou.blogspot.com aintstudyingyou

    Dave, the entire national culture and economy prize athletics more than academics. Why are African-Americans, then, being singled out for this imbalance? The academic performance of boys and males as a demographic has steadily declined for these reasons, so much that some selective colleges have a different set of criteria for boys than girls. Yet, I have seen no complaint about this discrepancy.

  • http://aintstudyingyou.blogspot.com aintstudyingyou

    The issue you raise, Paul, is one of justice — not prudence. The question: Is affirmative action a just policy? (not is it a prudent one). It must be added, however, that various rationales for instituting affirmative action (compensating for past discrimination and ensuring a diverse student body) have entered into the Court’s prior reasoning more than a blind application of the 14th amendment. (And, as others have pointed out here, the Reconstruction amendments came into being to try to prevent a white-dominated country from disfranchising emancipated black slaves. It didn’t work. Even a cursory look at those historical origins and the present fact that UT is not a minority-dominated institution suggests that neither the letter nor the spirit of the law has been subverted.)

    But, in my opinion, we should all be asking: 1) Is affirmative action at the postsecondary level a sufficient remedy to the longstanding problem of educational inequality? and 2) Does the conservative adherence to lawmakers’ “original intent” negate false equivalences — since discrimination against whites by an empowered nonwhite class has never been the case in the US?

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    it is all about white people keeping what they have stolen….

  • Finn

    I’m not sure why she’s going against affirmative action–particularly when it helps females out the most out of any minority.

  • Jay

    A wise man once said “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

    I interpret that as “society should be merit based” not “cut my kids some slack because they are black.”

    -Hispanics and Blacks do tend to be the smallest demographics in universities but they also have the highest high school dropout rates. http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=16

    -Goals are not being set to make Hispanic and blacks competitive students as a whole http://www.usatoday.com/story/ondeadline/2012/10/11/florida-board-education-race-reading-asians/1626837/

    - Improvements should be made from the bottom up, rather than top down IMO. The system should not fail them up to high school then make it up by giving them handicap points in higher education admissions processes.

    -Raced-based admissions boosters has shown detrimental effects http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444799904578050901460576218.html

  • NYC Calling

    She needs to go sit her pale self down this is frivolous and a waste of time. The nerve of her to think that African Americans need affirmative action to give them a chance in life. WE ARE more intelligent than they give us credit for. They need to be reminded about who came up with all these inventions here in the US that has caused major progression the MAJORITY if not ALL was by African Americans.

    Oh how these narcissistic pale Europeans like to conveniently forget (No racist) just had enough with this entitlement attitude. This entitlement attitude is really a “HIDDEN INFERIORITY COMPLEX” to who we truly are as a people. Clearly there is something about us they fear. And that fear is the essence and the best of who we were as a people from the old ages of the past.

    Slavery and their attempt to contain us was the biggest hint in giving us a clue on just how valuable and precious we are as a people. Sooner MORE African Americans wake up and realize our power and use it for good the better of we will be as a people. It will propel us further than the efforts of the Civil Rights Era!

  • http://gravatar.com/thingsmegansay Megan

    Loved this reaction! These were my sentiments excactly as long as the case has been going on. I also happen to be a student at the University of Texas and many students (of ALL backgrounds/cultures/etc.) that I’ve talked to are against Miss Fsher’s argument. And I’m not sure if anyone knows this, and I apologize if this was mentioned already, but IF she even wins this case, UT wil revert back to accepting ALL students that are in top 10 percent here in Texas. From what I have learned, that means no international students, no out of state students, no private school students, and no one outside out of top 10 percent will be admitted to the university, at least next year and the year after. So all in all no student like Abigail Fisher will be accepted and she’s pretty much arguing against herself…

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    i will be happy to go to ‘merit’ base just as soon as you give up every advantage gained by slavey and genocide and white privilege. deal?

  • http://brazenlee.blogspot.com brazen Lee

    this “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.” seems incorrect. “Not rejected from” would be accurate, no?

  • http://gravatar.com/miaposey miaposey

    YES,CHILE! LET THEM HAVE IT!

  • whatever

    this person is so stupid it makes me angry. not abigail fisher, but the writer of the letter. i’m not even going to try to argue here in a sea of 270 comments, but you ma’am are seriously misguided and just wrong. keep living life with that sense of entitlement

  • http://gravatar.com/summerbreeze86 summerbreeze86

    can this person please show me where they left her mind…

  • http://gravatar.com/jamesfrmphilly jamesfrmphilly

    @whatever : what color are U?

  • traci

    although i agree 100% with the message of your comment, I know you said “no racist” in there but it does make me (and i’m sure other white people) feel hurt when you keep using the word “pale” like that. there’s a certain venom in it that i (and most forward-thinking whites) wouldn’t use to refer to black people.

  • Jay

    No deal. I can’t give up those advantages because I’m Asian, not white.

    Slavery was abolished over 150 years ago and schools become integrated over 50. Kids that go to the same school receive the same quality of education. Doesn’t matter if they are white, black Hispanic, or Asian, they read the same books and are taught by the same teachers. They are playing on a level field and should be treated the same. Learn to compete, not look for a handout.

    However, that is not to say there aren’t differences between school programs. In the 21st century, these disparities in the quality of education mainly come from differences in ECONOMIC CLASS not in racial or ethnic background (even though class and race may be correlated.) Affirmative action should help disenfranchised students of any color, and so it should be based on class not race.

    Quick question, if race-based affirmative action is repayment for slavery, how is a school or employer supposed tell if an African student even descended from slaves. Many come from families who recently immigrated here. Do those recent immigrants deserve the same special treatment?

  • http://www.chocolategringa.com Margaret

    Ok you are an idiot…and I really should stop there, but Ill go on. Affirmative action helps all minorities including WOMEN. It is not only for BLACKS and is not reparations for Slavery. You, as an Asian, (and Im assuming you are a woman) have benefited. Please know that!

  • Kelly

    Evette Dioone is a black women whom has serveral accomplishemts under her belt. If you don’t know now you do. Check her out http://evettedionne.com

  • Jay

    No need for name calling.
    I KNOW that affirmative action is meant to address equality and combat discrimination. I included that last hypothetical question simply to address jamesfrmphilly’s reply to me about slavery. I never once said AA was only for BLACKS. Read more carefully next time.

    It’s also arguable if AA is equally applied across all minority groups.

    “A 2005 study by Princeton sociologists Thomas J. Espenshade and Chang Y. Chung compared the effects of affirmative action on racial and special groups at three highly selective private research universities. The data from the study represent admissions disadvantage and advantage in terms of SAT points (on the old 1600-point scale):
    Blacks: +230
    Hispanics: +185
    Asians: –50
    Recruited athletes: +200
    Legacies (children of alumni): +160″
    Quoted from wiki but you can look up the actual study.

    AA was first put in place in the 60′s when society was barely becoming desegregated. I’m not saying there is no longer discrimination but America has become a much more integrated society since then so the need for affirmative action should be re-examined as society progresses.

  • beautifulmind727

    @Jay: Although I am a big supporter and reader of Clutch magazine, I rarely find the desire to comment mainly because I am a law student and I do not have the spare time. Jay, I am going to “Thank You” for bringing me out of the shadows because your statements were so misinformed, and judgmental that it is almost sad.

    First off, to your assertion that disparities in education mainly come from economic class, I will agree with the fact that socioeconomic status has become more important in recent years than it has been in the past. However, since it appears that you like to read articles in sociology, I’m sure you are aware that schools are more segregated now than they were 40 years ago. From my experiences attending school in inner city Boston and the South Bronx, the schools were predominantly African American and Hispanic. From middle school onward after I moved from the suburbs to the inner city, there was not an Asian face in sight during my educational experience. Now I am not saying that my experience is determinative, I’m just noting my observations. Now as you noted there are some disparities in the education in terms of resources and funding. Where I disagree with you is the assertion that even in the same school there is a level playing field. Maybe you should speak to someone currently doing Teach for America. There were things that some of my classmates in the inner city were dealing with at home that would make a grown person’s world spin. From dealing with absent father’s, drug addicted parents, the foster care system, disabled parents, homelessness, the list goes on. All of that within itself makes it very difficult to go home and complete your homework let alone pay for and study for the SAT’s especially if you are the sole breadwinner in your home at 16. There are few people that are able to rise above whatever situation and make it to college.

    Since you are so knowledgeable, I’m sure you have seen “Waiting for Superman” or maybe you should check it out. Do you know what it is like to be one of the very intelligent students who don’t make it in the lottery? Do you know what it is like to walk through metal detectors and be searched to go to school or learn off of photocopies of textbooks? Better yet, do you have any idea what it is like to attend a school where the chemistry teacher also teaches gym, and the science teacher also teaches math? What if you are attending a school that is preparing you for 8th grade proficiency exams in high school, while the private schools and exam schools in the area are preparing their students for college? I am truly failing to see this level playing field that you speak of. Especially if your parents cannot afford to send you to private school and there are no more vouchers or there is no more space left for you in exam schools.
    Now I’m going to let you know, Jay, that I am an adamant supporter of Affirmative Action. Not because I like hand outs and I don’t know how to compete but because I experienced many of the educational inequalities that i addressed above. As a result, when I took my SAT’s my score was horrible and without Affirmative Action I would have had a VERY difficult time getting into any college. Once I was able to get my foot in the door I graduated from the University of Massachusetts Amherst Magna Cum Laude with Commonwealth College Honors distinction and now I am attending a tier one law school. I do not see Affirmative Action as a hand out because once you get into college you still have to do the work to keep up with your classmates.
    Furthermore, I am not sure if you have heard of the term “token minority” but I will inform you that just because your ethnic group is doing okay, it does not give you the right to stick up your nose at other people. I can point your attention to Yick Wo v. Hopkins to remind you that your history in this country was not always rosy. You have finally gained the acceptance you seek from the majority and that is great, but before you disrespect the struggle of those who are still fighting for equal treatment in this country, you may want to do some research first.

  • http://gravatar.com/pocketsizednegro Courtney**

    Beautifulmind has already wonderfully picked apart your asinine assertions, but allow me to point out a few other things:

    “Kids that go to the same school receive the same quality of education. Doesn’t matter if they are white, black Hispanic, or Asian, they read the same books and are taught by the same teachers. They are playing on a level field and should be treated the same. Learn to compete, not look for a handout.”

    Um…yeah, bout that. Allow me to introduce you to the early criminalization of black children, which primes them quite nicely for the suspension -> expulsion -> crime due to lack of opportunities due to lack of education -> $$$ for the judges that get kickbacks to -> $$ earn money for private prisons that then -> employ prisoners for slave labor. Going to the same schools means jack. shit. for racial inequality. As if black children attending the same schools as non-black children means that we are likely to have our intelligence recognized and acknowledged the same as non-black children and recommended for advanced tracks (or conversely, more likely to be put in remedial classes rather than possible learning disabilities/etc. explored for issues in the classroom). We make up 17% of students but comprise over a third of those subjected to corporal punishment:

    http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2008/08/19/violent-education

    Just priming us for being stopped and frisked or driving while black, I’m sure. But you know, I’m sure we deserve being physically punished – after all, black children are especially scary and dangerous. We can even turn Skittles into lethal weapons.

    Furthermore, if black people for centuries had our livelihoods destroyed and stolen… neighborhoods burned down… families ripped apart… and weren’t compensated as we should have been for the work we did.. meanwhile, whites were allowed to build their wealth generation after generation, to the point where they still make up the people with the most financial resources and power (like the power to decide whose resumes with “funny-sounding” names get immediately tossed to the trash… or approved for a mortgage… selected to sit on a jury for a criminal trial… decide which scripts on TV get greenlit and ergo, how certain people are or aren’t shown… among hundreds, if not thousands of ways that this power manifests itself everyday in our lives). So you can miss me (and everyone else) with the tired argument about how long ago slavery was, and how long ago Jim Crow was. The cumulative effects of the past affect the way the world operates today. That is a fact. The reason why Europe is so rich and support its child, America, is a direct result of the wealth that was stolen from Africa and why the African map and state looks the way it does today. The reason why America was able to get to the position it has today is a direct result of billions of unpaid labor it used from my ancestors, save WWII.

    “Learn to compete, not look for a handout.” See, this is why you’re a jackass and you probably don’t even know it. You probably didn’t even realize that you’re using the same “coded” phrasing that the racist dog-whistlers on the right use to accuse black people of being lazy beggars. It is not LOOKING FOR A HANDOUT TO ACKNOWLEDGE THAT INSTITUTIONALIZED RACISM EXISTS AND TO TRY TO TAKE STEPS TO MITIGATE IT. Okay? Every benefit blacks have, no matter how small (especially relative to the institutionalized racism and white privilege) is always spun as an undeserved “handout.” Welfare, despite more white people being on it than blacks, is spun the same way – money taken straight from the mouths of starving white children and given to my black ass to pay for my flat-screen.

    “Quick question, if race-based affirmative action is repayment for slavery, how is a school or employer supposed tell if an African student even descended from slaves. Many come from families who recently immigrated here. Do those recent immigrants deserve the same special treatment?”

    Strawman much? No one considers “race-based affirmative action” to be repayment for slavery. Not in the slightest. It is intended to mitigate the effects of centuries of our racial EXCLUSION. And it doesn’t even give us that big of an advantage. Couldn’t you just as well consider “legacy” points to be a white “race-based” affirmative action, considering they were the only ones allowed in schools for the longest time? Funny how we never hear much anger about that particular advantage, right?

    And in any case, your short-sighted question completely overlooks the fact that really, unless you’re directly emigrated from Africa, odds are at some point your ancestors were slaves. There’s no reason for black people to be on islands/South America/North America except for the legacy of slavery. And in addition to beautiful’s recommendation of Waiting For Superman, I highly suggest reading “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander.

  • Me~phi~ME

    @ Courtney LMFAO

  • Me~phi~ME

    *Off topic…@Jamesfrmphilly: I’ve read all of your post as I stumbled across this article (new to the blog and I’m lovin’ it) Can I be the Jamesfrmphilly fan club president? No JOKE?!?!?

  • Kimberley Willay-Jenkins

    “In blaming affirmative action for that denial letter, you are disregarding your responsibility as a college applicant. It is much easier to fault affirmative action than to hold up a mirror and see that you just weren’t qualified.”

    Let. Me. Get. This. Straight.

    Using YOUR words and YOUR perception would it not be the same if a BLACK MAN is not HIRED that he should not claim discrimination and rather “hold up a mirror and see that you just weren’t qualified”?

    Let me know if you would listen to a white guy tell a black man to “hold up a mirror and see that you just weren’t qualified”.

    You couldn’t handle that.

    You would blog ad nauseum.

    There would be Twitter campaigns.

    Rappers would come out in agreement that “The Man” was keeping this black man down by not hiring him and how it had nothing to do with qualifications but race.

    If it were found the black man were unqualified, you would argue that he could be trained or that it is a societal issue as to why he was ill prepared to compete on the level necessary to gain such a job.

    Folks would be crying that a lesser qualified black man get hired because someone has to give a brotha a chance for once.

    Yeah.

    Funny, how it all changes when racial roles are reversed.

    YOUR words.

    Used against you.

    Enjoy.

  • Kimberley Willay-Jenkins

    Someone answer me this.

    How come everyone here is ready to pick apart academic qualifications in this case?

    However when Notre Dame will not accept a black athlete because his grades are too low or his SAT scores are too low; why is it everyone demands THEY lower THEIR standards so he can play wide receiver for the Fighting Irish?

    No different than this white girl.

    Many black athletes would love to play Division I football for Notre Dame but can’t even read the playbook let alone a college textbook because for years they have been coddled as athletes and not required to perform as students.

    Why is it that Notre Dame should lower their STANDARDS FOR ALL STUDENTS to accommodate black athletes?

    Yet Univ. of Texas needs to follow those standards and NOT let this white girl in?

    If you agree that Notre Dame should not take the black athletes who cannot qualify academically; you are in agreement with me and as such can agree the white girl should NOT qualify for Texas either.

    BOTH should not qualify.

    But if we bend the rules for black athletes why is it suddenly time to point to standards when it is a white girl trying to gain admittance?

    It’s hypocritical and makes you no less racist than those you claim to rail against.

    Me, I want EQUALITY.

    If you don’t qualify, we don’t bend rules no matter if you are white or are black and can run really fast.

    Same. For. All.

    It is a meritocracy I dream of.

    One where there are no excuses for what you are not capable of doing and opportunities for that which you are indeed capable of doing.

    Rewards for those who achieve and nothing for those who fail to do so.

    No matter the color.

    However, I believe the bulk of posters here would agree a college let a black athlete in who cannot read yet are yelling Texas should keep this girl out because her GPA is a 3.59.

    Please.

  • slice

    @Jenkins

    Did you even bother to READ the article? Fisher’s grades were JUST under the requirement standard to get in the college—hello, her grade weren’t high enough to get her into THAT particular college—THAT’S why she didn’t get in. Also,WHAT proof do you have that Notre Dame, or ANY other college for that matter, is lowering their standards for black athletes? That’s a huge blanket statement/assumption you made,with NO statistics, or proof to back it up. Are you talking about one particular case that you actually know the details of, or are you just generalizing in general?

    No one said ONE damn thing about lowering standards to let anybody into ANY college–that just sounds so ridiculous. What particular black athlete do you know actually got in college this way? I can’t help thinking of an athlete who plays for the Detroit Lions, Ndamakong Suh, who not only has a degree in business, but is already in the process of starting one for himself. And he’s not an exception to the rule–far from it. Also, there was a similar case a decade ago when a white woman who didn’t get in U of M sued for the exact same reason Ms. Fisher did—because she couldn’t get into the college of HER choice—basically all it did was pretty much eliminate affirmative action in Michigan,along with a couple of other states. And basically, all it did was decrease the number of black students/student of color in college. It also get id of the need to make sure that an equitable number of black students/students of color were getting into college.

    Also, if you read most of the above posts, they go into detail about how white people have ALWAYS had more privilege in this country,no matter what, and no matter how unqualified or qualified they were, they always had the privilege of being white inthis country to fall back on. Also,this young white woman will more than likely NEVER experience any discrimination in her entire life, so stop trying to make out like she’s the victim here, because she isn’t. She obviously didn’t meet their requirements—with her grades she can get into any other school she wants to, just not the one SHE wants to go to, and that’s something she’s just going to have ot learn to accept–that not always getting what we want is part of life,and she’s just going to have to learn to accept that.

    Also she’s the child of legacy students, meaning she had more of a leg up into getting into that college than the average black student/student of color. She also had to know the requirements to get it, so then she has no excuse to go around whining about not getting in when she HAD to know she was a point short of said requirement. Enough said–I’m done!

  • slice

    Did you even bother to READ the article? Fisher’s grades were JUST under the requirement standard to get in the college—hello, her grade weren’t high enough to get her into THAT particular college—THAT’S why she didn’t get in. Also,WHAT proof do you have that Notre Dame, or ANY other college for that matter, is lowering their standards for black athletes? That’s a huge blanket statement/assumption you made,with NO statistics, or proof to back it up. Are you talking about one particular case that you actually know the details of, or are you just generalizing in general?

    No one said ONE damn thing about lowering standards to let anybody into ANY college–that just sounds so ridiculous. What particular black athlete do you know actually got in college this way? I can’t help thinking of an athlete who plays for the Detroit Lions, Ndamakong Suh, who not only has a degree in business, but is already in the process of starting one for himself. And he’s not an exception to the rule–far from it. Also, there was a similar case a decade ago when a white woman who didn’t get in U of M sued for the exact same reason Ms. Fisher did—because she couldn’t get into the college of HER choice—basically all it did was pretty much eliminate affirmative action in Michigan,along with a couple of other states. And basically, all it did was decrease the number of black students/student of color in college. It also get id of the need to make sure that an equitable number of black students/students of color were getting into college.

    Also, if you read most of the above posts, they go into detail about how white people have ALWAYS had more privilege in this country,no matter what, and no matter how unqualified or qualified they were, they always had the privilege of being white inthis country to fall back on. Also,this young white woman will more than likely NEVER experience any discrimination in her entire life, so stop trying to make out like she’s the victim here, because she isn’t. She obviously didn’t meet their requirements—with her grades she can get into any other school she wants to, just not the one SHE wants to go to, and that’s something she’s just going to have ot learn to accept–that not always getting what we want is part of life,and she’s just going to have to learn to accept that.

    Also she’s the child of legacy students, meaning she had more of a leg up into getting into that college than the average black student/student of color. She also had to know the requirements to get it, so then she has no excuse to go around whining about not getting in when she HAD to know she was a point short of said requirement. Enough said–I’m done!

  • Cleo Hines

    Um….why are white women commenting in this forum now? This is still a space for women of colour is it not? You have so many spaces dedicated to you and your blind privilege , go there and bitch and moan please. Sheesh, talk about entitlement……

  • alex n

    I do not understand your response. You don’t respond with anything substantial except an insult and the extra insult of saying you can’t bother to respond. I think you are identifying the wrong people as entitled. That whole “legacy” system of alums is affirmative action for white people generally. Whites simply want to keep their affirmative actions so they complain. A lot.

  • alex n

    It is an error to think that the only thing a student bring to a campus is their GPA or SAT scores. My 19 year old explained to me that in order to try to solve the problems the generations of people before him created, that he has to understand the diversity of experiences in society. That his initial answer to any problem is his initial answer and not necessarily the correct one. Even if it’s the correct one on a test. The real world is filled with people, not numbers not formulas. To be successful an individual has to understand the experiences of lots of other people and not just their own. So yeah, an African-American kid who persisted through a racist school system but had lower grades than a economically privileged kid brings something more important to the table than the paper cutout of a 3.59 GPA and cello playing kid.

  • DD

    One correction for those who might use it against this article:

    The article states: “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.”

    What she means is:

    “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin not because you’re white.”

  • ?!?

    Are you crazy? That is not what this article or any of us are talking about. I have never heard a black person who thinks some illiterate athlete deserves a chance on a football team because he can run with a ball because of Affirmative Action. YOU need to look at the athletic program at these schools and why these WHITE decision makers care more about letting in an athlete over someone like this girl. It most likely has to do with $$$. I guess UT didn’t think she would be bringing enough $$$ or helping out a sports team to lower the bar for her.These people black and white who want to lower the standards for a ball player want to do it not because of Affirmative Action, but because they want a good football team. Somehow I don’t think you are too crazy to understand that.

    You just tried to bend everyone’s comments around to make it seem like we are saying that some guy who can barely read deserves to be admitted because his ancestors were slaves. I don’t think there is a comment on here about letting in a person who is that subpar because of athletics. I mentioned this myself. Many of you all don’t care when a person black or white gets admitted to a school with below average grades on an athletic or music scholarship or with legacy status. So no, you don’t really want equality. If this girl had gotten the Affirmative Action that she needed to get in and that white women have benefited from as well, this case wouldn’t even exist and you would think she’s another person that earned her place in the world.

  • langston

    This article and most of the comments supporting it go a long way toward illustrating the age-old human truth that hatred is more powerful than reason, and that nobody knows how to step on your throat like your own people.

  • Aurora

    She was simply not QUALIFIED! Don’t you get it? She was not good enough, particularly in comparison to the other applicants. Why is that so hard for you to believe?

  • Chris

    Jenkins,

    There is only one meritocracy in America and it is athletics. Any receiver playing for Notre Dame or Texas is there on merit, they have earned it from their speed, strength and abilities. If you continue to perform you can continue to play. Every other system in our country is set up so white people like myself can succeed. I can live my entire life and never experience any discrimination and be viewed as a successful and good person without ever having to step out of my cultural comfort zone because much of American culture is set up with people who look like me in mind. Whether we are aware or not, white people are born into privilege and we set up white cultural norms and white systems and often look at those who do not reach them as deficient. A high SAT score is most directly correlated with wealth than anything, and therefore only basing admissions on a test score would only server to perpetuate privilege. We all lose something if we lose affirmative action, including whites, who would be more likely to continue in our blissful ignorance and never be forced to look at ourselves and our world critically and develop the slightest bit of humility and empathy. So oppose affirmative action if you wish, it is your right, but know that it is still sorely needed by us all. Also, please find a more valid stance from which to debate, because your belief that America is somehow a meritocracy is, to quote our Vice-President, a bunch of malarkey.

  • Jenny

    Actually, UT admitted that they didn’t accept her because she is white, she was more qualified than many of the blacks and Hispanics in her class that did get accepted. And she’s not asking to repeal the equal opportunity act, she’s asking for them not to include gender and race in their application to help decide who should be chosen, so they would rather have to look at their achievements to make a choice, doesn’t that sound more like an equal opportunity? Why should she give up not being treated equal just so other people can be given a free ride? That is exactly the opposite of equality, it’s racism.

  • Jenny

    The thing about this letter though is that it’s not correct, Abigail’s test scores and GPA DID qualify much higher than many of the minorities that were accepted, the person who wrote this letter hasn’t done much research on her case, so to quote her as a reliable source is quite silly, I didn’t read past that first few sentences of your comment because of that because it’s irrelevant if you don’t know your facts.

  • The blacks took my reading comprehension!

    Actually, they said that there was no way she was getting in with those numbers, regardless of her race. Even her own lawyers didn’t try to argue that she was more qualified than any of the admitted applicants.

  • Sage Johnson

    I am very very strongly in favor of affirmative action, but this piece gets very personal in a way that undermines your own argument and flatters you not at all. Did you mean to say “You were not accepted into the University of Texas at Austin because you’re white.”? That is, after all, Fisher’s own claim.
    You got a 1680? Sounds like you may have gotten a lower total score than Abigail Fisher, not a higher one. UT does not count the writing section. Her 1180 (500 verbal, 680 math) was her score out of 1600. Are you saying you earned a score of 1680 out of 2400? If she got the same score on writing (500) she would have tied with you; lower than a 500 you would have beaten her, more than a 500 she would have scored higher. Judging by the numbers provided, however, she beat you, 73% vs. 70%.
    I know this feels personal to you, and believe me I feel the same way. If you just want to vent, go ahead. If you want to contribute to the future safety of affirmative action, it would be much more effective to think through and express your argument more clearly. Use the platform you have!

  • Sankèt

    Hi. This might be a rant, but I feel I need to get this off my chest. I am an Indian male. I am an Asian American. I went to a high school in the Alief ISD school district in Houston, Tx. The school was 25% white, 25% black, 25% Asian, and 25% Hispanic. The neighborhoods that comprised the school were also equally mixed.

    As for my background. I grew up in India till age 12. My parents found a better opportunity for us in USA. So we moved to Houston. It is a joke to compare the opportunities afforded in the USA to India and many countries in Asia, Africa, South America, Central America, etc. My school had about 40 kids to a class. My school had less desks than students. My school had no a/c. My school had no computers, TVs, or projectors. Truly poor.

    But, one thing I did notice….is the students were poor, but they were there to learn, become educated, and amount to something in life. Take the worst of the worst school in DC or LA or Detroit and it would look like heaven in comparison.

    You see, even though the school is more destitute than anywhere in the US… Kids had role models for parents who were not apathetic and the parent(s) ingrained discipline and stressed education. Don’t even think about being an idiot and joining a stupid gang.

    Now one thing I noticed in junior high and high school…… On average, blacks and Hispanics had worse role models and more apathetic parents then whites and Asians. And yes there are some lousy white and Asian parents. But the propensity is much greater with Black and Hispanic communities.

    Blacks have a very high rate of single mother households. Hispanics have more role models (more 2 parent households) than blacks, but a higher drinking problem and abuse. Both communities are plagued with drugs and especially violent gangs.

    This comes back to the parents. Parents…

    A higher proportion of parents in the black and Hispanic communities expect schools to be baby sitters, are apathetic about there child’s education performance, turn the other way when the kid acts out or misbehaves, and allow there kids to get corrupted by idiots in gangs. This apathetic attitude fosters lower achievements, mediocrity or worse, lower test scores, lower grades, more limited college opportunities, and lower paying jobs.

    It is unfair to pass on the burden to hard working people like me and make it more difficult to achieve. Why should I suffer and absorb the responsibility of others? It is not fair

    College Applications and the work-force should not have any request for ones race. Not in 2012. Not anymore. Everybody is equal. You will be judged on your merits only.

    Hold yourself accountable. Be a man. Be a father. Pay attention to your kids. Don’t be apathetic. And be a role model. Oh, and teachers are not baby sitters.

    Like all ethnic and racial communities, every community has problems and issues. One of the biggest problems for blacks and Hispanics are weak, apathetic, or non existent role models.

    It’s 2012. Hold yourself accountable and fix the problem. It’s not about money… It’s parenting. Being a better parent will generally yield better grades, higher test scores, more opportunities, and better college opportunities and higher paying jobs.

    Only you have the power to solve the problem. Be accountable. Stop blaming others and expecting to be coddled

  • Anonymous

    don’t be dumb.

  • Nysha Caldwell

    Unfortunately anon, Sage is right. And this comment was pointless and degrading. Unnecessarily so.

  • Melissa Langham

    You talk down about her like she did not even attempt to make it in the top 10% of her class. She graduated 82/674, which makes her top 12%….. that’s not a far off number. Secondly, I’m actually a student at Ole Miss and I have not once seen or even heard of a single person being discriminated against whether they be a minority or majority race. You have your thoughts backwards where you believe that affirmative action will prevent minorities from gaining admission to schools. Affirmative action places an unnecessary burden on racial majorities. Do you know what that’s called? DISCRIMINATION. You don’t have to be a minority to be discriminated against. The fact of the matter is NO ONE should be eligible to go to a university if they did not get there based on merit. At the University of Texas at Austin, 3/4 of students are admitted based on the 10% plan. the remaining 1/4 get accepted based on merit and extracurricular activities.NO ONE, not blacks, whites, Hispanics, what-have-you, NO ONE should be denied admission to a university based on their race and for the sole principle of “diversity”.

  • Bry

    This author is uneducated about the situation and should read the claims that Ms. Fisher and her lawyer have actually made. She understands that no matter what she would not have been accepted to the university. However, their was bias based on race in that decision which is unfair and unconstitutional. Why should race effect the Personal Achievement scores? Is being born a certain color an actual achievement that you have worked for? Understand the case and keep an open mind. This is a matter of equality and fairness, and bias has no place in the college admissions system.

  • Alex

    I hope you realize that Ms. Fisher’s SAT score translates to a 1770 on the 2400 scale; that’s 90 points higher than your 1680. In addition, several studies have shown that an Asian-American applicant must score a 2330 on the SAT to have the same chance as a white applicant with a 2120 or an African-American applicant with a 1650.

    You lash out against “white privilege” and “entitlement” while championing the values of a meritocracy, but how, exactly, is a system where an Asian 2330 = a white 2120 = a black 1650 consistent with your emphasis on merit as the sole determinant of admissions?

    Further, regardless of your stance on AA, it is blatantly clear that applicants with numbers lower than Ms. Fisher’s 1770/3.59 were admitted to UT (whether it be because of sports, legacy, AA, or other considerations).

  • BrownGirl

    Jenny,

    Could you please provide evidence that she would indeed have gained admittance to UT if not for her race/ethnicity? Perhaps a link to this admission from the school? Most of the information available stated that since she did not meet their top 10% and SAT score criteria for automatic admission that they went with other achievements/merit. Also, could you define equal opportunity? I gained acceptance into prestigious institutions based on much more than simply my grades and scores (which were stellar). Does that mean that people who were not allowed the opportunity to live abroad or had less time to focus on school due to other responsibilities/obligations etc. are less qualified than I am? Also, I would recommend looking up the definition of racism. I understand your point on equal opportunity and I am sure it has worked (I believe California has a system akin to the one you are referencing), but I am not certain about this being “reverse racism.”

  • BrownGirl

    Hi Sankèt,

    Most of your comments within your post/rant is riddled with prejudiced. For example, “One of the biggest problems for blacks and Hispanics are weak, apathetic, or non existent role models.” I think some members of those community might find that to be just a tad bit offensive and some daresay might even DISAGREE. As a “minority” you may feel entitled to “tell it like it is,” but without much data other than your own worldview and jaded experiences I think you may want to reconsider some of the things you have said. Just a word of advice.

  • BrownGirl

    On the contrary. I think the University defined Merit to include race. Also, just because you may not have heard or seen it does not mean it does not exist or happen.Why would you want to live in a world that is not inclusive or other races or gender? That is the whole premise of affirmative action. To level the playing field and include women and races other than white. Judging by your name, I am assuming you are a woman, I am sure you have benefited in some aspect.

  • BrownGirl

    It is interesting that you have said this statement, “Is being born a certain color an actual achievement that you have worked for?” However, that is what white privilege stems from.

  • BrownGirl

    Alex,

    could you please list some of those studies that suggest that Asian Americans have to maintain higher scores than other races in order to gain admission into institutions of higher learning? I would think it would be on the contrary. Especially when looking at medical schools or even the university system in California. I was under the impression that minority inclusion and even a level playing field has aided in AA pursuing higher learning.

  • BrownGirl

    Actually. That. has. happened. Let me see. More so between the start of this country to about probably today. Where do you live? Judging by the use of your colloquial term “The Man” I should be asking which decade. Plenty of people qualified or not don’t get what they want all the time, but her case is going to do more damage than not.

    Maybe you should crawl from that proverbial rock sometimes and see the light.

    Enjoy.

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  • Lashay

    I find this comment ridiculous. I’m a minority myself and l love affirmative action. I don’t consider affirmative action a form of discrimination or a burden. I find it considerate that people are still repenting today for what happened to my ancestors. It’s only in effect because people feel that it is necessary to measure how racist we are today v.s how racist we were in the past. It’s not my fault that I’m black, so why should I feel bad if people want to give me benefits because of it.

  • Chelsea

    Is not the whole premise of racism that one race is superior to another? And has this country not spent hundreds of years reinforcing those very principles? Obviously for the majority of the United States’ history, being born a certain color was an achievement: i.e. being born white. And now that the playing field has been attempted to be evened out in the last 50 or 60 years (which is not that long of a time), white privelege has come into fruition because some laws no longer cater to it anymore. I feel like this is a matter of entitlement and white privelege.

  • T.J.

    Wow, sounds like you went to town with a thesaurus. Way to make your letter sound “smarter.”

  • Monica

    Actually, Alex, Abigail applied in 2008, which means her 1180 SAT score is out of 2400. When I applied in 2006, SAT scores were already based on a full score of 2400. Her score of 1180 is incredibly low.

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  • Dancer

    So? Arguing for something unjust simply because it benefits you would be hypocritical. Just as a white person can see the injustice of institutional white privilege, a woman (or a person of color) can believe AA is wrong on principle. Whether you agree or disagree with AA, it should be on principle alone, and not just because you personally get something out of it.

  • Stop&Think

    This letter is a clear indication not only of how misinformed so many are of the facts of this case, but more importantly of the sheer hypocrisy inherent in any racial debate since 1973.

    As a white male, I understand that it is neither appropriate or logical for me to comment on the plight of another race, religion, ethnicity, gender, etc. So, how is that any member of another race, religion, ethnicity, gender would be able to accurately comment on any plight that I may or may not have had in my upbringing? It stands to reason that only members of my community would understand, or at least this is the stance that is taken in every racial debate.

    The author makes a fundamental error when she asserts that “institutions will have the option to deny students access to the educational American Dream based on their ethnic background”. This is the misguided notion that leads to the author’s vitriol. An absence of Affirmative Action does not mean a presence of Discriminatory Policy. If the court were to rule that race is not allowed as a factor in admissions decisions, the ruling would only accomplish that – eliminating race as a factor. So, the implication that as a result the school would be able to discriminate against a student based on race is impossible, given that the student’s race would not even be identified on the application (assuming).

    Now, with the absence of race as a factor there will be plenty of well-connected white males who are given admission to colleges and universities. Unfortunately that doesn’t matter because it is already happening. I cannot propose an acceptable solution for the good ole boy network, nor will I try to do so. Your guess is as good as mine, and I am a white male.

    This brings me to the inherent hypocrisy of the debate. I was denied admission to schools where minorities with comparable accomplishments were accepted. I did not cry about it, I took it for what it was and moved on. I have lost jobs to minorities – been specifically told that they are looking for more diversity. Again, it is what it is in my mind. By far the worst, is having volunteered my abilities as a military officer, and being denied the opportunity to continue because, and I quote, “We need to put more women in this class”. This one hurt the most, but again, we all persevere.

    How dare anyone, especially “Despiser of White Privilege” dare to question my status in life and the effects it has had on my journey? I do not dare to pretend that I understand what it is like to be a black woman, and I expect the same in return. That is what equality is, and should be. I will not apologize that I was born white in a world where, yes, there are rich white men that largely rule the nation. Unfortunately, the vast majority of white people are not the rich, entitled white men that you so passionately despise. The rest of us are just trying to get by.

    In the process, many of us have had to grow up in a world where we lose opportunities to minorities as a result of policies set in place to level the playing field. Is this fair? In some ways, yes, in others, no. But that is not the point I am making here. The point is that after all the years of messaging and emploring the nation to understand your plight, and that it is unfair to quickly dismiss arguments based on racial bias, you have done just that.

    Are we post-racial? I don’t know. But I do know that it is ridiculous to tell Ms. Fisher that she has no right to feel discriminated against. If I were to tell you “Hey, it’s 2013, black people aren’t discriminated against anymore”, you would laugh in my face and tell me I’m stupid – and you would be right in doing so. But the very reason you would laugh is the reason Ms. Fisher is allowed to feel the same way. There is no reverse-discrimination Ms. “Despiser”… only discrimination. It is clear that the concept is lost on you, because it is evident you were raised to believe that the world owes you something. Unfortunately for all of us, it does not. Not for you, not for me, or anybody else.

    So, who really feels entitled here?

  • woman roar

    Absolutely agree with your option b) when kids aren’t taught that they will not always get their way. In life you don’t always get what you want. Sometimes you get something better and sometimes you get nothing at all.

    That goes both ways. What’s wrong with taking race OUT of the picture COMPLETELY? Let your merits ALONE get you into college? Let merits ALONE get you the job or promotion. THAT MY FRIEND IS EQUALITY. I could care less what color you are…if you can’t get the appropriate scores or can’t do the job then sucks for you. Study more, try harder. I had a shitty childhood…grew up poor and did what I had to do to get where I am today. May not have been the conventional route cause I didn’t have the grades at the time or the money to afford it or qualify for free grants but guess what…that didn’t stop me. You stop yourself, no one else.

  • Bee003

    The 1180 score of Fischer’s is out of 1600 NOT 2400. Furthermore, as it has been mentioned, Fischer’s complaint is not that she was denied admission based on her academics; instead, her complaint was that students who had academic records equal to or below hers, but were of a racial minority, were accepted based on the university’s attempt to diversify. I work in the public school system in Texas and see this every year. Regardless of how you feel about affirmative action, it is very clear that UT admits minority students who are less qualified than some white students to meet the goal of a diverse student population. If you support the university’s method, then fine. But be aware what Fischer’s argument is, instead of making it sound like she is “entitled” when, in fact, her point is pretty legitimate. You can ask any kid in the state of Texas. Additionally, Texas already has the top 10% rule, which guarantees diversity since Texas is fairly segregated. Some pockets are mostly Hispanic, some mostly African-American, etc. UT’s addition of race as a factor in the admissions process is unnecessary, and, quite frankly, insulting to minorities.

  • jl9830

    I’m ashamed of this girl, please don’t blame all white people!!

  • http://livelikenow.com Dayna

    Thank you, you said it best !

  • http://livelikenow.com Dayna

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/24/politics/scotus-texas-affirmative-action/index.html
    U.S. Supreme Court says use of race in university admissions is OK but sidesteps sweeping ruling on issue.

  • Jojo

    The Despiser’s impressively frank expression of racial hostility doesn’t help her case. She undercuts herself by bragging of academic credentials superior to Fisher’s, while committing repeated errors of syntax in her essay. She offers errors in quantitative fact and reasoning as well. Fisher’s SAT score of 1180 would not be “well below” an average of 1200, it would be statistically nearly the same. Regarding comparing Fisher’s SAT score to Despiser’s, they are not calculated on the same scale. Fisher’s Wikipedia article says that her score was earned on a scale with a 1600 maximum, with writing scores not considered at UT in 2008. The Despiser’s score of 1680 would obviously need to have been earned on the full 2400 point scale. Doing the division, Fisher’s score was a bit higher. Regarding high school GPAs, it is easy to see several reasons why Texas compares them within each high school, as opposed accepting the top 10% of GPAs compared state-wide. UT wanted local competition. In my Catholic high school sitting on a Northeastern urban-inner suburb interface, a school that drew working class and lower middle class strivers from across the area, a 3.64 was good for highest score in gender group, and salutatorian. The highest overall GPA won valedictorian. My nephew’s graduating class in his high school serving the lowest income area in a small Midwestern city included numerous “4.0″ graduates, and even a few 4.5s, on a scale not explained at graduation. Congratulations to all of them, but my nephew’s school obviously inflates grades compared to mine. Unless Fisher and the Despiser attended the same high school, their GPAs are no more comparable than those of my nephew and me.

    That said, I can understand reasoned support for racial criteria in support of diversity. Don’t expect people who reasonably suspect they are personally paying the price of those criteria to shrug it off as offset by their “white privilege”, of which by definition they would be unaware.

  • Hailla

    This is deep but The letter writer forgot to mention Affirmative Action is the number one help for White Women to be accepted into schooling institutions and careers. Affirmative Action is not all about just race, but also includes gender. When the letter writer spoke on Race she should have not just protected Affirmative Action for just African Americans. Why? Because she herself then feeds into the stereotype that Affirmative Action only helps Black people which is not factual. Although her comparisons harshly shows that Fisher did not qualify for UT…it is the truth. I understand the writer completely in her anger with this case. However, don’t just make is a Black thing, make it an all Minority thing because that’s what it truly is. :)

  • http://gravatar.com/lenborello lenborello

    What was the average SAT of a black student admitted to UT? And what was the average SAT of a white student? A Hispanic student?

  • Jay Do

    What’s the average amount of money spent on a white public school student in America versus a black public school student or a Hispanic public school student?

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