I’ve always been a fan of Joaquin Phoenix and his eccentricities. From his roles in movies like Walk The Line, where he portrayed Johnny Cash, and his “mockumentary” I’m Still Here, he’s established himself as an actor that’s willing to take risks.

In a recent interview with black film critic, Elvis Mitchell for Interview Magazine, Phoenix discussed everything from his upcoming films, his appreciation of the hip hop group Black Moon, to volunteering with his parent’s mentoring program with inner-city kids, and racism in Hollywood. As one that’s not known to bite his tongue, Phoenix quickly jumped into the problem with white people in Hollywood. They’re just oblivious and disconnected.

PHOENIX: Yeah. So I don’t experience any of that. I mean, dude, how can you work in film and still see the overt racism that exists in film and not just be furious all the time?
MITCHELL: You know what? As a black person, you see so much racism. Films are no different than the government, politics—it’s everywhere. It’s not exclusively film. It’s infuriating to see it in film. But my being in film changes things.

PHOENIX: Yeah, but there’s all of this horrible racism that white people don’t even recognize. Did you see Jumping the Broom?
MITCHELL: I’m a black person. Of course I saw it.

PHOENIX: I feel like all white people have to see the film just because I’ve never seen a movie in which most of the white characters in the movie were just working. It was fucking great. It was almost comical. There was a scene during the wedding reception, and there are, like, eight white people just carrying stuff. The main white character with some dialogue was the ditzy, stupid assistant. I enjoyed it so much because you never see that. But that’s something that I think white people don’t notice. They don’t notice that the fourth character is black and that’s what it always is. It’s always happening. It’s just the assumption that, “Well, that’s just a representation of life.”

MITCHELL: But you know what’s also underneath that? A lot of the time you see all this ambition from these black actors and it’s just pouring off the screen. Because they don’t often get a chance to work, and when they do, they don’t usually get a chance to work with other black people. You can just see the pleasure of those actors. I went to see that movie with my sisters and you could see the crowd levitating. People wonder why black kids don’t go to the movies. It’s because, what’s the point? If you don’t see yourself, then why would you go?
PHOENIX: You know, I got this script a while ago for this thing. It was kind of like an action movie, and it definitely dealt with race in a big way. But then it didn’t. Without getting into specifics . . .

MITCHELL: Did the film get made?
PHOENIX: Oh, it got made. But you could not believe that this thing actually got made, because it seemed like it was from the 1940s or something. It’s got this black character in it who was literally always being saved by the white dude because he was, like, cowering in the corner. So I went in and met the director and producer and I said, “You guys realize that your only black character is this guy, and it’s like the most clichéd thing we’ve seen in movies forever.” And they were like, “What do you mean?” And I was like, “You mean you’re not even aware of it?” They didn’t even realize what they were doing. So I said, “Look, I’ll give them a read if the black character doesn’t get killed and is going to make it into the sequel. They have to put him in their sequel, the black character.” So I spoke to the writer and was like, “Dude, be a hero. When this movie comes out in the summertime, give black kids a character they can see themselves in.” But it just didn’t occur to them, and I realized what a battle it is when people aren’t even aware of what they’re doing. I know what that battle is. I’ve done battles like that before, and you lose. So I didn’t do the movie . . . They did keep the black character alive, though. He’s in the sequel-at least, that’s what I’ve heard.

MITCHELL: Was it a successful movie?
PHOENIX: I don’t think it’s come out yet. It’s one of those big action movies.

Although a lot of people in Hollywood may find Phoenix’s eccentricities weird and off putting, it seems as though he’s more in touch with what’s going on than he’d lead people to believe. 

  • SC

    Fat is not a nuance. I’m not saying I see fatness as being what makes a character complex. :/ Fatness also does not prevent nuance. Complexity/nuance is the antithesis of stereotyping. There’s no such thing as a nuanced mammy stereotype…because a nuanced person is more than just a one dimensional asexual caretaker. It’s not like fatness makes a character simplistic and stereotypical.

    Anyway, here’s someone who puts it better than me: http://lapocketrocket.tumblr.com/post/21933717390/i-tire-of-this-fucked-up-notion-that-only-skinny-black

  • ?!?

    @SC – Black women on network television shows are usually overweight. This is not a coincidence. Hollywood likes casting overweight black women. It screams over and over that we can’t compete that we don’t take care of ourselves that we are less desirable than others. If that’s not what you see, good. But that is the underlying message behind it. Overweight white women can barely get roles, but overweight black women are just as if not more sought after as thin black actresses. Of all the black women with major roles on network TV that I can think of, there is Bailey on Grey’s Anatomy. There’s Amber Riley on Glee. There is the comedian on Parks and Recreation, Joy Bryant on some show, and Kerry Washington on Scandal, and Vanessa Williams. That’s a 1:1. ratio. There may be way more women that I’m missing, but white women are not 1:1 like that. I wonder why especially considering they have an obesity problem too.

    In any other country with another entertainment industry, I would agree that fatness does not make a character stereotypical, but in America, there is a stereotype of black women being fat. I wrote about this on another article on this site, but this is just Hollywood mocking us and putting white women on a pedestal.

  • cheeky

    “Themes of self-hatred”? JUMPING THE BROOM was a fun family film with non-stereotypical roles—it was also written,directed and produced by a black couple (the Akils.) I really enjoyed it, and don’t get where you got this “theme of self-hatred” out of it.

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