Judge Debra S. Nelson recently set a June 2013 date for the trial against Trayvon Martin’s killer and former Florida neighborhood watch volunteer, George Zimmerman. In the time leading up to his day in court, Zimmerman’s defense appear to be doing everything in their power to have the case dismissed, including seeking a “stand your ground” defense to get the murder charges dropped. They’ve even requested to see the unarmed teenager’s records to build a self-defense case for Zimmerman.

Judge Nelson ruled that Zimmerman’s attorneys can inspect the school records and social media postings of the 17-year-old he fatally shot in February. This information, according to Judge Nelson, will help Zimmerman’s team determine whether the slain teen had violent tendencies.

Martin’s family are reeling about the fishing exhibition, as they feel it’s an attempt to further victimize Trayvon Martin. In order to restore honor to their son’s legacy, Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton revealed plans to revise Stand Your Ground laws across the country and to create the Change For Trayvon Committee of Continuous Existence to actively support candidates, elected officials and causes that agree with their mission to revise these laws that originally allowed their son’s killer to walk free.

What’s your opinion on the judge’s latest ruling, Clutchettes?

13 Comments

  1. Amanda

    I’m surprised this evidence could even be admissible. I don’t know much about Florida law but in New York there are evidence rules which prohibit prosecutors from using any evidence of character or bad acts to prove someone has a propensity to commit a crime. Scratching my head. Really Florida?

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