On Thursday, a federal appeals court threw out Michigan’s controversial voter-approved ban on affirmative action in college admissions and public hiring. The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati ruled 8-7 that 2006′s “Proposal 2” is unconstitutional because it presented a burden to opponents.

“It means thousands of black and Latino students will now have the chance to go to the most selective colleges and graduate schools, including the University of Michigan,” said George Washington, a Detroit-based lawyer who argued to have the law overturned.

Michigan voters approved Proposal 2, 58 to 42 percent, in November 2006. The amendment forced Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and other public schools to change their admissions policies to remove the affirmative action component.

This is the second time Proposal 2 has been heard by the 6th Circuit court. In July 2011, a three-judge panel ruled the ban unconstitutional and unfair to minorities. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette appealed that decision and asked for the second rehearing before the full 15-member appeals court, which then rejected his appeal.

(Continue Reading @ The Grio…)

6 Comments

  1. Not to be the debbie downer, but I am kind of alarmed that the ruling was 8-7, and not a wider margin. They literally needed only one person to flip it in the other direction. I am also alarmed that Michigan voters even approved the appeal of Affirmative Action in 2006. I am just worried about whether Michigan will have the demographics to uphold this decision should it come around again.

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