A woman’s hair tells a lot about her personal style and outlook on life. Dry and brittle is not the way you want to be perceived. Relaxed hair takes nurturing and care to remain strong and beautiful. The following tips will steer you toward putting you best, mane forward.

Don’t shy away from hair oil.

Oil is excellent for relaxed hair. It serves as a heat protectant, nourishes the scalp and eases dryness to help eliminate breakage. Some people fear that using oil will give locks a heavy greasy look, but this is not true. Coconut oil, jojoba oil, argan oil and olive oil are all lightweight. It’s all about the amount of oil that is used and how it’s used. Always take the less-is- more route when applying oil to hair and scalp.

Wash hair at least every 10 to 12 days.

Clean hair is the foundation to healthy hair. Depending on whether your hair is healthy or damaged, how often you wash can vary. If you feel the need to wash hair more often, try doing a co-wash; that way, you’re locking in moisture and not stripping hair of essential oils and nutrients that can be lifted with shampoo.

Condition, condition, condition.

Whether it’s a daily or weekly formula, your hair craves conditioner. Choose a daily conditioner that’s lightweight and meets the specific needs of your hair, for example if you have a dry scalp look for shampoo that’s specifically for that problem. Deep condition hair a minimum of once bi-weekly. If you use conditioner on wet hair, be sure to use a wide-tooth comb during the detangling process to avoid breakage.

Limit the amount of heat you use.

Some of the worst hair horror stories that I’ve heard are those involving heat damage. Using too much heat on tresses is never a good idea. Instead of blow drying hair right after a wash, try letting it air dry. If you are on-the-go, let hair dry for about 15 minutes and set the blow dryer on medium or low heat. Ceramic hot rollers are also a nice option for a style that’s full of body, but not to taxing on your hair’s health.

What tips do you use for healthy relaxed hair during the winter months, Clutchettes?

-Margaret Francois

  • Perspective

    Why does this site INSIST on using biracial women and white girls dipped in chocolate as their representation of beautiful black women – only to write other articles condemning Zoe Saldana for playing Nina Simone – which I am also a staunch opponent of.

    I mean really, you all could have used a different picture – FOR REAL

  • Pseudonym

    [scrolls back up]

    [scrolls back down]

    They look black to me. Also, biracial women are just as much black as they are white (and are often considered as black by others b/c of one-drop rule), so they should be represented on this site as much as non-biracial black women. and, not every black woman has a big butt and full lips. There are some waif black women as well. I think Clutch represents them all in their stock photos.

  • Perspective

    LMAO

    “They look black to me. Also, biracial women are just as much black as they are white (and are often considered as black by others b/c of one-drop rule), so they should be represented on this site as much as non-biracial black women.”

    BAHHHHHHHHHH LMAO – I love it.

    Oh sure all this is said – UP UNTIL A BLACK MAN WALKS IN THE ROOM AND CHOOSERS HER OVER THE BLACK WOMEN WHO DON’T LOOK LIKE THEM!

    Now its a problem – Now – THEY AREN’T BLACK ENOUGH!

    LMAO!!!!!!

    The inconsistency of black women. You know that 1 drop rule will be the death of black people.

    I already hear brothas, now, who don’t want to deal with black women saying,

    “I CAN GET A WHITE WOMAN AND STILL PRODUCE BLACK BABIES”

    according to your above COMMENT – they are right.

    BAHHHHHHHH LOLOLOLOLO – Black women.

    Inconsistent as hell.

    “She’s black until a brotha leaps of you to get to her”
    “She can represent you as long as you feel you can vicariously LIVE through her beauty – but once sistas realize that HER beauty is not theirs”

    ITS A PROBLEM.

  • Perspective

    “They look black to me. Also, biracial women are just as much black as they are white (and are often considered as black by others b/c of one-drop rule), so they should be represented on this site as much as non-biracial black women.”

    Up until a brothas leaps over you to get to one of them.

    Then they aren’t black enough.

  • C

    How did an article about RELAXED HAIR get turned into ^that up there? Anybody with coily/curly/wavy hair can get a relaxer–black, white, biracial and so on. Most black women are not 100 percent black (some of us have a grandparent or parent who isn’t fully black), and even with two black parents, we come in all shades and mixes.

  • Yb

    Chanel Iman is a quarter Korean, three-fourths black. Sessile Lopez is an Afro-Dominican, and Perspective is an idiot.

  • Jordin

    What does brothas “leaping over you to get one of them” have to do with the fact that some bi-racial women possibly relax their hair?

    Just stop…

  • __A

    This guy only comments on dating articles or any other article where he can say something negative about black women. Look how he used an article about relaxed hair to try to say that black women are jealous of black men being with biracial women. Where did that even come from? This is an article about hair!

    As you mentioned, biracial women, light skinned women may be lighter, but many of them relax their hair. Not every biracial woman has hair like Jennifer Freeman.

  • Perspective

    Brothas leaping over black women to get to these biracial women who are NOW accepted as BLACK has nothing to do with them relaxing their hair, if that’s what they do. It has to do with the INCONSISTENCY of black women CLAIMING these women when they seek to promote their BLACK BEAUTY – only to find themselves upset when they only later realize that that beauty is not a TRUE REFLECTION OF THEM.

    i.e. in the case of black men choosing these ambiguously black women OVER them.

  • Perspective

    Yes, I’m an IDIOT because “they are NOT BLACK!”

    Amazing how inconsistent black women can be.

    Let us have a beauty contest and give the crown to these 2 women and BLACK WOMEN WILL NOT BE COSIGNING THEIR BLACKNESS.

    With sistas, its not about consistency, everything is CONDITIONAL

  • Tori

    “White girs dipped in chocolate”
    WHAT
    I don’t even know what to say to that

  • Mademoiselle

    Wow Perspective, you managed to completely derail this entire article. The light skinned woman in that picture must’ve really done a number on you to turn an article on relaxed-hair care into a debate about shadism.

  • Pseudonym

    Why are you trying to turn a post about how to put oil in your hair to keep your cuticles smooth into drama?

    [handing you a bottle of chill pills]

  • Pseudonym

    [eye roll]

    and you got allllllll that from this ONE photo of thousands on Clutch showing dark, light, biracial, waify, curvy, obese, etc. women?

    You have issues. and brothers aren’t leaping over me, so I’m having a great day.

  • Bosslady

    Soooo…. I think I’ll throw in a comment actually relevant to the article! Lol. Coconut oil and Extra virgin olive oil is a beast for thick, relaxed hair in these cold climates!! Bought my first tube of pure cocunut oil two days ago and used it after washing my hair. My hair is actually moisturized and hydrated, without my having to use half a bottle of hair lotion #Loveit

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  • IslandgirlDesi

    @BossLady…..Thanks for your comment. I will try that because my hair gets really dry during the winter months and “hair” lotions doesn’t work well with my thick hair. Can you elaborate on how you use the coconut oil? Do you use it as a hot oil treatment or just a daily moisterizer?

  • Pink Lipstick

    Lols. This article is about healthy relaxed hair not 100% black relaxed hair. Believe it or not some biracial women do relax their hair.

    Men approach biracial women because they are attracted to them. I certainly don’t have a problem with men approaching women they find attractive. I am only concerned with men who are attracted to me.

    Also, I don’t understand why you are so obsessed with beauty contests. Being exceptionally beautiful doesn’t mean a man is more inclined to love a woman or have a healthy relationship with her. Beautiful and “regular’ women get mistreated alike.

  • Pink Lipstick

    You are better off commenting on articles in Cosmopolitan. There you will find many white women who are worthy of your praise.

    *eye roll*

  • LaLa

    Yes that is a good point

  • LaLa

    Sorry that was to Perspective
    Please don’t shoot me but I do feel that the media is more willing to put a black lady with well trying to think of a term that’s not offensive so let’s say less African features such as a slimmer nose e.t.c. (not ref to Clucth Mag only)
    I don’t like it but must admit when you ask a guy his preference it does tend to sway to that type of woman. Guess there is Individuality with who your asking but thinking generally and from looking at the women on black mens magazines.
    I think its a sensitive subject for black women that can cause offensive such as Melanie Fiona stating she has “good hair” due to being mixed implying that if you’re not mixed your hair is bad.
    Not that I agree with everything Perspective said but I can’t ignore that what we (society) class as beautiful black women tends to be Beyonce, Alica keys and Lauren London who don’t really seem to resemble the majority of black women, but society is besotted with them.
    I’m not sure if its due to my mother being Arubian and father being Dominica as I don’t want to sound like Melanie Fiona lol but I have long curly hair that is very soft notice I didn’t say “good hair” but particularly black men refer to my hair as though I’m so special and unique due to my hair texture. I’ve also had comments such as “you are so pretty, you don’t have a black nose at all, you must be mixed,” so the equation is soft hair pointed nose=pretty girl. Hope this hasn’t caused any offensive as that is not my intention just my experiences.

  • Val

    Yb Calling someone an idiot makes you sound uneducated everyone has the right to voice what they think

  • Nambi

    Stop putting chemicals in it maybe lol

  • Bosslady

    Hi IslandgirlDesi,

    I use coconut oil as a daily hair moisturizer, Coconut oil is seldom sold in liquid form, though it does liquidify in hot temperatures. I deep condition my hair by mixing equal portions of conditioner (usually Organic Root Stimulator Olive Oil Replenishing Pak) and olive oil, and sit under a steaming cap. I then blow it out with the comb attachment will a little olive oil, and maybe some serum, but I use coconut as a daily moisturizer. It’s so rich I don’t necesarily have to use it everyday, and it doesn’t leave my hair with that greasy feeling, it literally penetrates into the cuticles.

    Nambi,
    Using chemicals has nothing to do with my being getting dry my dear, my hair is long, thick and healthy. Maybe you live in the Sahara Desert, however where I live, winter is not a game! Whether relaxed or not, due to extreme temperatures and the thickness of my hair it will be drier this time of year!! And I haven’t actually relaxed it since July/August…But that is off the topic, and unrelated

    However, your concern is most sincerely appreciated…But don’t loose any sleep worrying about my hair, because I certainly am not!

  • Bosslady

    Hi IslandgirlDesi,

    I use coconut oil as a daily hair moisturizer, Coconut oil is seldom sold in liquid form, though it does liquidify in hot temperatures. I deep condition my hair by mixing equal portions of conditioner (usually Organic Root Stimulator Olive Oil Replenishing Pak) and olive oil, and sit under a steaming cap. I then blow it out with the comb attachment will a little olive oil, and maybe some serum, but I use coconut as a daily moisturizer. It’s so rich I don’t necesarily have to use it everyday, and it doesn’t leave my hair with that greasy feeling, it literally penetrates into the cuticles.

    Nambi, using chemicals has nothing to do with my being getting dry my dear, my hair is long, thick and healthy. Maybe you live in the Sahara Desert, however where I live, winter is not a game! Whether relaxed or not, due to extreme temperatures and the thickness of my hair it will be drier this time of year!! And I haven’t actually relaxed it since July/August…But that is off the topic, and unrelated

    However, your concern is most sincerely appreciated…But don’t loose any sleep worrying about my hair, because I certainly am not!

  • Candigirl

    Remember that your summer products may not be enough in the winter. Just like you change your lotion from summer (lighter) to winter (darned near petroleum jelly), you may have to do the same with hair products.

    Winter air is very dry. Use a humidifier. Drink a lot of water. A whole lot of water.

    Amp up your intake of Omega-3 rich foods and foods high in Vitamin A & E , like kale and other dark leafy greens, which are in season in the winter.

  • IslandgirlDesi

    @Bosslady…Thanks! I will try it this weekend and Nambi….your a non-factor. Your ignorant comment speaks volumes about your intelligence….its seriously lacking.

  • dee

    Nambi should have put it differently but it is kinda true I love relaxing my hair but its kinda disheartening fighting against the breakage that the chemicals cause jus not ready to go natural and don’t know if I ever will be

  • Bosslady

    Dee,
    I beg to differ, It had nothing to do with bad articulation, and everything to do with an illogical presumption. As others have mentioned, one is suppose to change their hair and skin products according to the season, for me, having dry hair in the winter has nothing to do with using relaxer, it was actually my natural-haired friends who recommended I use coconut oil, as they use it in their hair to combat the harsh winter weather. My hair doesn’t suffer from any breakage. If relaxer is causing your hair to break, then yes,you should stop relaxing it, or at leastseek professional advice.

  • kamille

    @lala

    You all need to stop with this European features nonsense. Since when did big black lips and super uber dark skin= 100% black. I’m REAAALLLYY going to need you guys to visit some countries in Africa, and stop being ignorant. A thin nose does not equal white, there are West African women, like straight up from Nigeria or Guinea, with thin noses.

    The love of my life is from Kilimanjaro, Tanzania and he has light brown eyes, golden hair, and light/med brown skin and has Tanzanian parents, and his parents’ parents are Tanzanian. Please get a clue.

    smh

  • kamille

    I think that was the most troubling thing about his comment. It suggests that beautiful dark-skin women can’t be authentically black, but “white girls dipped in chocolate.” That says a lot about what he deems truly beautiful at the top of the totem pole. So beautiful black women aren’t black…they’re ‘white’ dipped in chocolate. So white girls equal the most beautiful and the most desired? So therefore, all these beautiful black women (African, West Indian, American etc.) running around, must have like 1/4 inch of white blood in them.

    Every time Perspective comes on here it makes me vomit with speckles of blood in it because he has nothing truly deep and meaningful to add to the conversation other than a. black women are ugly b. black women are single and lonely c. black women got attitudes d. nobody wants black women e. black men should and could pick other women

    Oh and f. black women are single mothers who are destroying the community.

    For a man who thinks black women are shitty, he sure trolls this site so much and makes 1hr+ length audios on Gen X about us. smh Guess I would be making 1hr+ length videos if I wasn’t gettin any and didn’t go to school nor had a job and lived with mami and papi. lol

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