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Black Girls Who Stay Blonde
Not everyone can pull off blonde hair. From honey-tinged to golden butter to platinum, which is the color Nicki Minaj just started rocking (yay or nay, Clutchettes?), there’s a rainbow of hues in the blonde family. Whether you are considering going blonde for a season or a lifetime, there are plenty of way to change up your ‘do. Take a look at our gallery for some inspiration from our favorite blonde celebrities.

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  1. i’m waiting for somebody to say that blonde hair doesn’t make them look any less african…..in 1, 2, 3

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    • Ms. Vee

      The title should be “black girls (and quasi ‘black’ girls) who stay blonde and straight”. Not a single Afro or dreadlock in sight. But hey I’m also waiting for someone to say that they aren’t trying to look white -_-

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    • Anon

      Were you this pressed about this issue before “Good Hair” came out?

      I’m natural, have been for years. I’ve been loose, loc’ed, twisted, braided… and BLONDE. Ya’ll need to quit projecting your personal issues on any black woman that chooses to pick a hairstyle or color you don’t agree with.

      Even if they WERE “trying to look white”, what’s it to you?

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    • antisocialengineering

      actually, the stark contrast of blonde wig on black face does indeed accentuate the Africaness. Which defeats the whole purpose of it. LMAO!

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    • It might not make them look inherently African but it doesn’t mean they are all “trying to be white.” Not saying all aren’t as I get that it is a cultural problem for us, but damn give us a break. Every other race can plump up lips, butts, and tan their skin till it wrinkles or gets cancer without “trying to be black.” Then please give us Blacks a break. While Blonde hair doesn’t work for everyone, it does look good and work for these ladies pictured. I’m really sick of the whole “you have to look this way, or act that way to be considered Black” and any other way you are “trying to be white.” *rolls eyes*

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    • Ms. Vee

      “It might not make them look inherently African but it doesn’t mean they are all “trying to be white.””

      …. Sure. Of course not. They’re just trying to appeal to the white standards. All that’s missing is the blue contacts to match.

      “Every other race can plump up lips, butts, and tan their skin till it wrinkles or gets cancer without “trying to be black.”

      I had no idea black people had a monopoly on tanned skin, full lips etc. But hey feel free to mention other non-black races proudly wearing Afro-textured hair in the spotlight. That argument would be more comparable.

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    • @Ms. Vee

      People like you are ridiculous. You wouldn’t want whites or any other race to make any assumptions about you based on your skin color or what you look like physically. Why the hell are you doing the same to your own people? We don’t get it enough from outside sources that we need to be self-hated on and judged by our own race???

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    • Ms. Vee

      @JS

      “You wouldn’t want whites or any other race to make any assumptions about you based on your skin color or what you look like physically”

      No. Not based on my natural features. But who am i to get upset when others notice that i physically change myself to blatantly mimic the characteristics of other races? Why get all uptight and deny the obvious? Further considering that you mentioned other races tanning and getting lip injections almost seems like you yourself were insinuating/assuming that they did it by “trying to be black”.

      If you saw people of other races proudly walking around like this (especially in the spotlight) what would be the obvious assumption? Be real now.

      http://ferenc.biz/pictures/huge-afro-hair-asian-model.jpg

      “We don’t get it enough from outside sources that we need to be self-hated on and judged by our own race???”

      Since when is being realistic judgmental? And last i checked not being fond of seeing black women wearing straight blond hair is not self-hate. Nonetheless all are free to change their appearance as they choose. Just don’t start wearing blue contacts and get mad when others notice your obvious mimicking of the Caucasian ilk. This is just my perspective. So with the wise words from the Keith and Kevin Hodge “Do whatever the F@$% you wannna do!” :)

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    • Or that they’re honoring Solomon Islanders.

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    • Ms. Vee

      @Anon

      “Were you this pressed about this issue before “Good Hair” came out”

      If you must know…no.

      “I’m natural, have been for years. I’ve been loose, loc’ed, twisted, braided… and BLONDE”

      I take it you don’t read/observe very well. I could of swore i was adressing my comment to the obvious STRAIGHT/YAKI haired, blondes (as you can see throughout the photos). Those like Kim Fields did not make the list.

      “Even if they WERE “trying to look white”, what’s it to you?”

      …..Im going to hope you’re smart enough to figure out why thats a problem.

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  2. BettiePAge

    emile sande makes a beautiful blond

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  3. talaktochoba

    if you’re not a natural blonde or from Sweden, you’re simply advertising your own low self-esteem looking foolish as if you narrowed your nose or jelled your boobs so you no longer look like Olive Oil but Aunt Peg;

    why try look like Gwyneth Paltrow…does she have surgery to spread her nostrils or tease her hair into naps just to make some kind of statement?

    and she’s not even the most beautiful white woman in the world!

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    • I’m not so sure the white folks agree with you there:

      http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/24/entertainment-us-gwynethpaltrow-idUSBRE93N11520130424

      I guess beauty is subjective as hell, cause in my hometown, she would be considered very substandard.

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    • “Can’t some people just want to rock blue eyes or light skin & still be exactly who they are?”

      this statement is logically inconsistent. how can you want to change yourself and yet be exactly as you are?

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    • @James

      It was a rhetorical question. the logical inconsistency you speak of was exactly my point. thought you knew me better than that by now

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    • I’m a Black woman, I dye my hair blonde. My self esteem (in regards to beauty) is fine & I have zero desire to be/look White. I simply wanted to do something different to my hair – I love it, looks good on my locs. Sorry, but that “low self esteem/don’t wanna be Black” theory doesn’t apply to everyone who picks up a box of dye! However, if the shopping cart also contains contacts, bleaching cream & an appointment w/ a plastic surgeon, I agree there’s a host of problems! Loosen up, people – it doesn’t look good on everyone BUT some folks can rock blonde & still be exactly who they are.

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    • “low self esteem/don’t wanna be Black” theory doesn’t apply to everyone who picks up a box of dye!”

      denial is a river in Egypt….

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    • just curious, why the exception for hair but not contacts and skin color? Can’t some people just want to rock blue eyes or light skin & still be exactly who they are?

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    • I think it’s “denial isn’t just a river in Egypt”

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  4. I don’t like it, but hey, there are people who don’t like the fact that some of us relax our hair and/or wear hair extensions.
    People can do what they want with their hair, but they need to be mindful that others will always have an opinion about it.

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    • “there are people who don’t like the fact that some of us relax our hair and/or wear hair extensions”

      sad that black women feel the need to look like white women….when we ARE the most attractive.

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    • Tell that to some of your bretheren who ridicule black women who do not have perms. The ones who prefer “red bones”… wigs and extentions have been worn since Cleopatra…Im about fixing what is in someones heart and mind first.

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    • @ MS. Information.

      Girl preach! Black men be the first to call a natural haired Black woman a “nappy hoe” Although my hair is relaxed + keratin now when I did have natural hair never did any other race have something negative to say about my hair, only Black men and sometimes other Black women.

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    • talaktochoba

      no, wrong, only black BOYS do that, not black MEN;

      kindly take time to understand the difference;

      and retake your college history classes, because almost from the dawn of time white men have been in awe of you, too;

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    • “Tell that to some of your bretheren who ridicule black women who do not have perms. The ones who prefer “red bones”

      the black man made me do it? really?

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    • @talaktochoba

      Not prescribing to that whole boys vs. men statement. These men are over 18 and have the law given rights to say and act a fool of their choosing and vote. Whether they live up to the standard of what being a “true” good man is another issue but they are grown ass men saying these things about Black hair.

      It’s true white and other races have been curious of Black hair but what they say isn’t negative in my experience. They want to touch it and they ask questions about it, some of those questions being a bit silly, however it is not inherently negative. Nor is any derogatory statement made. Not saying it never happens, as Don Imus has shown us, but for the majority the most animosity I have personally gotten about my hair (both natural and straight, however more negativity for natural) has been from Blacks, particularly Black men.

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    • talaktochoba

      and since when did age automatically confer or even infer manhood outside of the IRS and Selective Service?

      simply because they can sit upright and have opposite thumbs DOES NOT mean they are men!

      so now, my question to you is, why oh why are you devoting so much of your time, attention and emotion to these 30-40-50+ year old BOYS?

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    • @talaktochoba

      “and since when did age automatically confer or even infer manhood outside of the IRS and Selective Service?”

      Actually if you want to get really traditional, historically society treated boys as adult men at the ripe age of about 12, especially traditional African societies and tribes (since you care so much about staying true to our African roots). If anything I’m giving them more growth room by saying 18.Like I said its a different issue if you want to get into the philosophical and moral ideals of “what turns boys into men.” But societies has always looked at boys turning into men at a traditionally younger age, whether they acted fools or not.

      “so now, my question to you is, why oh why are you devoting so much of your time, attention and emotion to these 30-40-50+ year old BOYS?”

      One of the great perks of being a woman, that you and the many men who think they have some right to comment on women’s appearances do not realize, is I don’t have to devote any time or attention to these MEN to receive these comments. Black women could be minding their own damn business walking down the street, grocery shopping or you know, on a online magazine that has an article specifically catered for BLACK WOMEN. However leave to some MAN and he will appear to inject his ideals onto us about how we should be looking, acting, etc. Just because I can brush these comments off doesn’t mean they should even be made in the first place.

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    • talaktochoba

      try not be so stereotypic, will you?

      you want men’s attention, but only on your own terms;

      it really doesn’t matter this is a women’s forum, because in any forum you will lead a miserable life because you feel life owes you something because you’re a woman;

      it just doesn’t work that way–you have to give something first to get something;

      if you want the attention of real authentic men, whether they be 12 or 20 or 102, then you will have to present your most authentic self first;

      REAL men, whatever stripe, are not stupid–they know they can get an imitation of a woman anywhere anytime, and that inauthentic imitations, not being real to themselves, cannot possibly be real to others;

      now why should my son play with toys like you when he can wait for the real thing?

      a woman is a STATEMENT a man wants to make to the rest of the world, NOT a trophy he pulls down off his mantel to show off;

      now if it suits you to go around imitating Jennifer Anniston and Gwyneth Paltrow and calling yourself authentic, you have every right to do so–just don’t be surprised if you remain unhappy as you already clearly are, because the only attention girls will ever draw is from boys, NOT men…but then, that is exactly what you’re upset about now, no?

      see what i mean about being stereotypical?

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    • Regardless to what anyone says..black women want to be adored by our men…..my best friend went natural because ive been natural for years and it was very pretty on her…her husband say he hated it…she permed it…………….when black men consistently talk of J-Lo (women who arent black but have all the black girlness) how are black women supposed to feel?…I dont hear most brothers saying that Janelle Monae and India Arie are some bad chicks…lol….most black men just dont think that way….James you come from a different foundation than these dudes do.

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    • @talaktochoba

      It’s not being stereotypical in the sense you mean it as social categorization if its the way it happened. Tribal communities in Africa consider their boys to be men at an early age.

      I really liked to know where I said I only want attention on my terms and said that I think I am owed something. I merely pointed out regardless of my individual wants the attention I am given.

      Listen, if you are what you consider “a real authentic man” then I do not want your attention or the attention of any other men who prescribe to your beliefs. Keep it steppin.

      However I will say referring to any woman as a “toy” takes away her person-hood and makes her an object that could easily be discarded, raped or abused. That is dangerous territory and you may think I am taking your words out of context. However you must understand that words hold connective meaning in our society and no one would treat a “toy” like they would a human being. That is the whole case women fight against being objectified so cut out that type of language right now.

      “a woman is a STATEMENT a man wants to make to the rest of the world, NOT a trophy he pulls down off his mantel to show off;”

      Tomato, tomatoe. What you call statement I call BS on because its still a trophy. I’ll tell you what a woman is. A woman is a HUMAN BEING, not a toy and not a damn statement. She is an individual with thoughts of her own who should be respected. Her worth is not defined by the man she stands beside. She relies on her partner, as her partner does her, for love, support and spiritual uplifting.

      “because the only attention girls will ever draw is from boys, NOT men”

      I seem to be drawing a lot of your attention right now… you must be a boy then.

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  5. The Moon in the Sky

    Why are these women being referred to as girls when they are clearly over the age of 18?

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    • Did not mean any harm or disrespect. We have changed now – do not want to make this into a issue.

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    • We call each other “girl” all the time….lol….people are way too sensitive.

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    • The Moon in the Sky

      Maybe you do, but I don’t.

      This isn’t about sensitivity. It’s about respect and properly referring to someone by their age.

      You are probably one of those girls who refers to boys as ‘little man’.

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