Jane Fonda Says More Black People Should Adopt

Even though Jane Fonda has lived a public life, not every aspect of her life was made for public consumption. In addition to her two biological children, Fonda has another daughter: Mary Williams. Fonda didn’t intentionally set up to adopt Williams, but had a chance encounter with Williams when she was a pre-teen attending a summer camp.

“When she showed up at camp … you could tell that she was a special person. And she came back for several years.  And then she didn’t come back …,” Fonda said in the interview on“Good Morning America.”

Williams grew up poor in Oakland, Calif. Her family belonged to the Black Panthers. Life in the tough neighborhood eventually took its toll, and Williams became the victim of a sexual assault when she was 14.

Fonda made her an offer.

“Her grades were failing.  I mean … this is a hugely smart person, but she was failing. I said, ‘If you bring your grades up … by the end of the year and your mother permits you, you come down and live with us in Santa Monica,’” Fonda, 75,  said.

In Williams’ new book, “The Lost Daughter“, she discusses the adjustments she had to make when she became a part of Fonda’s family.

“I literally felt like I was dying.  I really did,” she said. “And when I saw that opportunity, I ran. I ran for it.”

In a recent interview with Tavis Smiley, he  asks whether the story of how Fonda “saved” Williams could could actually turn into a “Blind Side” type of movie.

“Maybe more black people should reach out,” Fonda says in a tense moment. She then adds, “And maybe they do, and we just don’t know.”

What do you think about Jane Fonda’s comment?

Tags: , ,
Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter
  • Val26

    In my experience of having a sister and brother-law who have formally adopted a child, I have come to know and hear of many other black couples who have done the same formally. It may not be a large number nationally, for it can be a complicated,
    emotionally stressful and drawn out process. It may be very much worth it, but you have to be committed. Also sometimes the stories that you hear from other adoptive parents can cause some to reconsider formal adoption.

  • The problem is that we have so many black/mixed kids in the system in the first place.

  • Danielle

    My husband and I tried to adopt and found it was around $25,000 plus legal fees. The Federal government gives you a tax credit for adopting of around $12k right now but you still have to front the initial amount. So, finances might be a factor.

  • miss B

    They do and APPARENTLY YOU DO NOT KNOW THAT. THERE ARE SEVERAL ADOPTED IN MY FAMILY, BUT ONE THING BLACKS DO NOT DO IS ADVERTISE, “HEY LOOK YOU ARE ADOPTED” THEY DO NOT DO IT FOR THE GLORY BUT FOR THE LOVE.

  • simplyme

    I know multiple Black people with adopted children. My cousins were adopted. My god parents’ kids are adopted… I don’t know the stats, but any perceptions of a difference probably have to do with overall differences in socioeconomic status between black people and white people. You need money and stability to be able to adopt. Hence, the disproportionate amount of Black kids that are in need of families in the first place.

    Also, when Black people can and do adopt, the kids in my experience are usually considered part of the family and thats that. I don’t think I’ve seen a situation where a Black person adopts a child and flaunts the adoption like a charity project.

    To be honest I never see when White celebrity adopts a White child (which is what happens more often) that they flaunt the adoption like a a charity project as I often see with interracial adoptions.