Meshael Alayban, arrested for slavery in Orange County

Meshael Alayban, a Saudi Arabian princess, has been accused of “slavery” after one of her maids broke free from her Orange County, Calif. home and said the Saudi woman held her against her will.

The victim, a 30-year-old Kenyan woman, slipped out of the home, flagged down a bus, and later notified law enforcement officials about her predicament. According to the victim, Alayban held her and four other maids from the Philippines, stole their passports, and forced them to work for very little wages.

NBC News reports:

Alayban first hired the Kenyan native in March 2012 to work at her home in Saudi Arabia, Engen said. They had signed a two-year contract guaranteeing the worker would be paid $1,600 a month.

In May 2013, Alayban and her family moved to Irvine with the victim, who cooked, cleaned, and washed laundry for eight people.

Authorities say the victim was working 16 hours a day for $220 a month – a fraction of what they agreed upon.

According to law enforcement, Alayban will likely be the first person prosecuted in Orange County under California’s Proposition 35 law, which increased the penalty for human trafficking. Alayban is awaiting arraignment in an Orange County jail. She is scheduled to appear in court today.

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25 Comments

  1. Apple

    Why are the most rich in the world so fucking cheap?!! I’m sick of these stories of them locking away maids or cheating freelancers/workers out money. You’re a billionaire for god sake! My maid would be making 100-250k with free rent healthcare and tuition for their kids

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  2. This is very common there. I lived there for a more than 12 years and the abuses are absolutely ridiculous but classism is very very apparent. Foreign works from east africa and south asia are treated like crap, barely see their families with very little to no pay to send them. Imprisonment is common and when I was in elementary school there we raised money to support workers and petition the government about it.
    But we had to be careful not to make the situation worse for them. It was very difficult to do anything as an american expat under Shiria law but just as hard to sit and watch. Workers would often come to our house to ask for water. We usually gave that and whatever we had extra: food, toiletries. My mom often was helping women trying to escape horrific marriages to saudi men as so many arranged marriages there were with men who had multiple wives and the men may favor one over another and treat the other like crap. Its a very very stringent country with many evil laws and practices especially regarding work and families.

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  3. Bree

    She looks evil and you can clearly tell that she feels no remorse. Evil people are real.

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    • Huda

      Wow, The court of public opinion has already convicted her. The truth will come out soon enough, and you and the others who convicted the princess will feel so ignorant. Wait for the facts and never rush in judging someone without any proof.

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    • Jade

      Why are you defending her so much? She your sister?

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    • You evil too, you must do stuff like that too. Stop holding people against their will. Clean your own house you nut case. She evil, mean and hateful and so arte you Huda..

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    • fozi

      Ok, first in Saudi Arabia labour usually live in the same house as the household. Before making judgements understand that this happens in Saudi and every gulf country. Are they treated bad ? yes but the percentage is low comparing to people who are satisfied. Would you think the household would tell them they’ll work for a certain hours per day, and then they get captivated ? Thats nonsense. 99% of maids live at the same place as the household. Otherwise why would they go to Saudi to work? and yeah btw, the only people who get $1600 in Saudi are bankers :) so you have to have a degree(bachelor minimum) .. Howcome it never came to mind that the maid knew the law in US and get financial benefits ??

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