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Nick Cannon’s hip-hop themed sketch comedy show Wild ‘n’ Out returned to MTV2 On July 9th, earning the highest ratings the network has seen since its inception. The show has been praised for its alternative perspective and inclusivity due in part to its diverse cast. Though black male comics are in the majority, they have been joined by black female personalities such as Loni Love and Tyra Banks as well as South Asian comedian Rasika Mathur and white comedian Mikey Day. This season, Cannon and the show’s producers seem to be dedicated to broadening the range of representation with the addition of openly gay black comic Chaunté Wayans and Thai rapper Timothy DeLaGhetto.

While not every identity group is represented on Wild ‘n’ Out, it seems safe to say that the show attempts to operate in a post-racial, inclusive space. Though jokes about race are a mainstay on the show, they are often tongue-in-cheek in an effort to use humor as a means of healing tension and consequently render it moot. Put another way, Cannon and crew try to laugh away the pain of misogyny, racism, and practically any other –ism.

Though the concept of relief through humor is in no way novel, Wild ‘n’ Out’s execution seems to be flawless. But, how realistic is it? Can we really laugh away generations of oppression and separatism?

To answer this question we can analyze one such attempt as it has progressed over the course of the show: fat shaming.

We can loosely define fat shaming as any suggestion that a person take action to reduce their weight. Fat-shaming can take various forms such as frowning as a person eats, making judgmental looks at a person whose weight has recently changed, suggesting a person adopt a more “flattering” wardrobe, and encouraging a person to eat “lighter.”

It has been said that fat-shaming is a means of encouraging people to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Though fat-shaming affects people no matter race, sex, gender, or ability, it is most often directed at women as a way of disciplining them into meeting societal standards for attractiveness. While men, such as Wild ‘n’ Out’s Spanky Hayes, can jovially lift their shirts, exposing and rubbing their bellies for the pleasure of their audience, women are expected to be ashamed of their weight and to act and dress accordingly in loose-fitting clothes so as not to disgust spectators.

It would seem that the producers of Wild ‘n’ Out sought to mend such wounds in casting well-know plus-sized media personality Loni Love in the show’s initial run. While Love did not seem to face direct scrutiny for her weight, she often employed her size to gain the adoration of the audience; at one time leaning over host Nick Cannon during a sketch and asking, “Can you bench press 200?” In making her size the central topic we are left to ask whether Love is giving us permission to laugh or if she is submitting to our desires?

Over the years, Wild ‘n’ Out has made no secret of its acceptance of fat-shaming jokes. Not only were such jokes a mainstay on the show throughout the first four seasons but even after a six-year hiatus, the fifth seasons’ very first episode employs fat-shaming jokes for a vital segment. During a regular sketch titled “R & Beef” an audience member complains that his girlfriend has put on too much weight and as a result he finds her less attractive. In response, the black team generates and performs a song admonishing said girlfriend for her unattractive gut and her greedy snacking habits. When jokes such as these become normative, we must ask whether Love’s self-deprecation can be an effective defense.

The practice of admonishing oneself to make the audience comfortable is a regular comedic trope. It is as if to say “I will make fun of myself so that when I make fun of other people it’s ok.” Or, so we think. Another plausible explanation is that we make fun of ourselves because we are aware of our marginalized position. It is quite likely that Love knew from her experiences and the tone of the show that fat women are not adored unless they are funny. Nearly every plus-sized woman in media today is a comedienne. Moreover, weight is often cited as a reason for the disproportionate marriage rates between black men and black women, adding a racial component to the mix. To be a woman of size is undesirable, to be a black woman of size is unacceptable. Love could have simply been submitting to this authority, making her oppressors feel comfortable with their beliefs rather than urging for change.

In the case of fat-shaming (or fat-acceptance) it would seem that humor as healing does not work (at least not in isolation).  When we joke about women of size we invoke very dangerous stereotypes that serve to underscore racist and misogynist sentiment. Given this fact, inclusion is not enough. We must actively work to combat stereotypes rather than joking about them in a murky (yet entertaining) grey area. While this may seem challenging, there are alternatives. What about poking fun at the boyfriend for his small minded beliefs? What if Cannon had responded that he loves plus sized women?

What do you think? Can humor heal? Can it override oppression? Is anything off limit in jest?

Kara Hunt is a freelance and academic writer and artist. She holds a doctorate in Culture & Theory with specializations in critical race theory, humor theory, and pop culture. Coincidentally, these are also her favorite topics to debate and write about. Kara is slightly obsessed with Quantum Leap (the show and the possibility) and strongly believes that fast food commercials featuring black music or jargon should be preceded by a trigger warning to protect her sanity.

  • http://gravatar.com/missinformation7 Ms. Information

    Humor is extremely healing…laughter is good for the soul…I am so proud of my friend Karlous Miller for being on this show…I love progression…

  • ceejay

    This article is stretching, at best; since they take suggestions to the audience humor in general tends to poke fun at any topic this is not specific to women of size. I also have to make note of an earlier comment, mentioning weight in general isn’t shaming. If someone has gained weight and is wearing clothes that are too small it isn’t shaming to suggest they buy clothes that are more flattering, especially if they work in a professional environment or hope to, if anything wearing clothes that are too small is shaming, indicating that no matter how uncomfortable they are squeezing into a size 8 is better than going to a 10.

  • MimiLuvs

    “…I also have to make note of an earlier comment, mentioning weight in general isn’t shaming. If someone has gained weight and is wearing clothes that are too small it isn’t shaming to suggest they buy clothes that are more flattering, especially if they work in a professional environment or hope to, if anything wearing clothes that are too small is shaming, indicating that no matter how uncomfortable they are squeezing into a size 8 is better than going to a 10.”

    For you, Ceejay, respectfully informing a woman that her clothes is not flattering her shape is not fat-shaming. However, informing a woman that she is wearing ill-fitting clothes demeaning her is a way of fat-shaming.
    For some strange reason, there are people who do not understand what is considered fat-shaming. I don’t know why.

  • Intellectionista

    I think you’re misreading.I don’t think she’s saying that this is specific to large women, she’s using them as one example and asking if it’s acceptable or if humor works to combat these issues. Also, clothing people perceive to be too small or too tight or unflattering might be in the right size. It does not give people the right to spew their negativity. If a larger woman choses to wear spandex in her size and you think it’s too tight you can keep that to yourself.

    I don’t think that joking about oppression works. The pain is still there, we are just masking it.

  • ceejay

    I’ll clarify, letting someone know that their clothes are ill fitting isn’t fat shaming, however I did not intend that to mean that a perfect stranger is allowed to comment on what you are wearing, that is rude regardless of size;but lets take the situation and reverse it. If your friend was wearing clothes that were much too big due to significant weight loss is it wrong to suggest that you go shopping?

  • Smilez_920

    If that’s the case can comedians make fun of anything anymore? Where is the line between poking fun and being out right mean is the question. Comedians make fun of women, Fat ppl, G@y ppl, blondes, men with small pen!s, boney women. I mean I think we throw around the word shame a little too much. Wild’in Out is a show based on playing the dozens. People make fun of Nick Cannons failed rap career every chance they get on there, the Indian girl that’s on there always pokes fun at herself. I think we do a disservice to big women when we assume their making fun of themselves to please others. Maybe she’s completely comfortable with her weight. The joke that was quoted didn’t seem offensive to me “Ready to bench 200 pounds”.

    As far as the clothing comment. Certain items don’t look right on everyone. Now should you go out of your way to make someone feel bad about what they have on “No”

  • http://gravatar.com/hsm36 Whatever

    I really enjoyed the first half of this article. I like Kara’s writing style and I look forward to more pieces from her. However, I’m tired of hearing about “fat shaming”. ANY comedy show, sketch or movie is going to have fat jokes. Yes, fat jokes can be cheap just like fart jokes are usually corny.

    My take on fat shaming and comedic efforts not being able to “heal” is that if you are comfortable and confident in your own skin, no one else’s words will rock your world enough to evoke a negative response.

  • SAA

    “We can loosely define fat shaming as any suggestion that a person take action to reduce their weight. Fat-shaming can take various forms such as frowning as a person eats, making judgmental looks at a person whose weight has recently changed, suggesting a person adopt a more “flattering” wardrobe, and encouraging a person to eat “lighter.””

    Two words: Stop it. Another phrase: GET OUT OF YOUR OWN HEAD!! There was a time when I would have listened to the arguments surrounding fat shaming but these Fat Acceptance and Fat Activists take this crap too far and now all this kind of stuff elicits from me is an eye roll.

  • MimiLuvs

    @Ceejay

    “…but lets take the situation and reverse it. If your friend was wearing clothes that were much too big due to significant weight loss is it wrong to suggest that you go shopping?”

    Personally, I don’t give a sh** about what type of clothing my friends choose to wear. I just don’t care, honestly.
    Plus, if I were to feel that way, then it is more of MY problem than it is my friend’s problem. Because even if I were to politely request that my friend(s) to change into something more flattering, I am really saying: “I am uncomfortable seeing you wear that outfit, change your clothes and wear something that makes me comfortable.”

  • Yeah

    I noticed the fat joke in the first episode too and it felt kind of…off. I mean, going in on her because she gained a little weight? C’mon now.

  • IDK

    I don’t know. I feel like “stop it” is the exact response we’re getting re: the Zimmerman verdict. I think ignoring any activist/marginalized group is dangerous.

  • Marisa

    This reincarnated version of Wild N Out SUCKS either Nick should have kept the original format and some of the original casts or not brought it back period. These new folks aren’t funny, the skits are flat out lame also how many Nick is married to Mariah jokes can they make.

  • amber

    I agree about the Mariah jokes. It seems as though this season is suffering, not only due to the new cast (who I believe are mostly using this gig as a means for future projects – mixtapes and such.), but to Nick’s obviously obnoxious egotistical jokes. Yes, clearly he’s been given other business ventures since the show left years ago, but it seems as though it has gotten to his head. And “getting money and being married to Mariah” is all he mentions in every breath he takes. No one even mentions the kids they have lol!

    I gave up on the “revamped” season 2 minutes after the Nick/Kevin Hart banter. Some things should be left in the past.

  • http://gravatar.com/solfresh solfresh

    Using the word oppressed is a reach for me. You have to keep in mind these are entry level comedians at best. I don’t even consider Nick Canon to be a comedian for real, not next to the greats such as Chris Tucker, Eddie Murphy, Bernie Mac, Cedric the Entertainer, Steve Harvey etc. Sadly, I love Kevin Hart but he’s been off to me lately. He seems more annoying and contrived lately. So of course you’re getting the low-level jokes i.e. fat shaming. Wild n Out is no Comic View, Def Comedy Jam, nor the Kings or Queens of Comedy. As well the format is different. The show is 30-1hr and each round is under a time constraint. It’s not stand up where you’re sticking with the same show and it’s developed over time.

    In the case of Loni Love, I think you’re viewing it backwards in the context of comedy. If you take the class clown, and how they think, it usually goes “let me make fun of myself so no one else can do it”. If you’re able to show people that it doesn’t bother you publicly they can’t hurt you. Think Eminem in 8 mile. Em battled rapped everything the opposing rapper was going to use against him. This was a shift of acceptance to one’s supposed flaws or weaknesses being turned into strengths. Then in a turn of events, he went and exposed the opponent for the fraud he was rendering him useless. So no Loni Love wasn’t necessarily giving us permission to laugh nor submitting to our desires, she’s being a strategic comedian and disabling her opponent.

    If I’m going to an improv show, I’m not necessarily looking at a plus size comedienne and thinking “gosh, I’m so uncomfortable for her because she’s fat.” When people go to these shows they want to laugh. If you step on that stage you better bring the funny whoever your subject is. Comedy, laughter and humor is simple, so I don’t see why it needs to be complicated. Everyone gets made fun of in comedy: the crazy baby mama, the lazy baby daddy, your senile grandmother, white people, mexican people, the kids, George Bush etc.

  • Tellthetruth

    Honestly, Wild n Out MAY take a halfway progressive/surface level stance on race issues in America but it FAILS everyday in respect to gender equity – I mean wild n out girls and women comedians alike on the show face consistent objectification by their male counterparts. Watch one episode – its impossible to miss. Its gross really. I dont see how that was overlooked in this article – on this blogsite – of Black women/women of color…

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