8napWgvLast October, a number of  Black and Asian students at the University of Texas, Austin campus said they were the targets of bleach bombing while walking on campus. In response to the incidents students, alumni and faculty members protested the attacks. Although these incidents occurred between June and September, Cindy Posey, public information officer for the UT police department, said the students recently came forward after the UT police launched their investigation.

Apparently the bleach bombing issue still persists on campus.

University of Texas student Bryan Davis, was struck by a bleach-filled balloon while he was walking to visit a friend in a neighborhood populated by UT students.

From The Burnt Orange Report:

Davis contacted the Austin Police Department, who said they’d put a detective on the case. Davis’ friends have told him not to hold his breath though; no prosecution has come from APD’s attention. Many students see no point in reporting the attacks when nothing has been done to stop them, Davis said.

That means there are many bleach bomb attacks in West Campus we don’t know about. The concept behind them is to “whiten” students of color. Bleach also blinds people. Luckily, no one has been blinded yet in West Campus. The very real possibility is hideous.

“I talked to my sister an hour ago,” Davis said. “She’s a freshman at Xavier University. I always tease her about how she should come to UT, but when I was talking to her on the phone about it, I was talking about why that was no longer a good idea, for her physical safety. UT is supposed to have the atmosphere of the entire city, it’s supposed to be progressive and forward-thinking, and here we are with hate crimes still taking place.”

Students of color feeling unsafe at UT is utterly disgraceful. The university, in conjunction with APD and UTPD, must do much more to protect its students in the neighborhood. They must figure out how to stop these attacks before they happen, and make sure they don’t so easily go under the radar.

A University of Texas spokesperson released this statement:

The University of Texas at Austin has long been committed to promoting diversity and ensuring respect and inclusion throughout the campus community. Our university should be a haven and home to students of all backgrounds. Austin Police are investigating the allegations about an incident off campus and we are anxious to learn the results. University police will work closely with APD on the investigation. The Dean of Students and our campus climate response team, which coordinates the university’ response to bias incidents, is actively reviewing these allegations and also prepared to work with Austin Police on their investigation.

Don’t worry Bryan, according to Bobby Jindal, racism is a rare occurrence here in the U.S., maybe you got bleach bombed because they wanted to help you brighten your whites.

 

14 Comments

  1. Anthony

    I saw a video about this on Huff Post, the bleach bombs are being dropped from high rise apartments. I can see where it would be hard to catch the culprits. The dropping of bombs on passers by is very cowardly.

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  2. If bleach can blind, a bleach bomb is a deadly weapon. If unwanted touching is assault, unwanted touching with a deadly weapon might be a second degree felony. If it is done out of racial prejudice, it can be enhanced to a first degree felony and a judge may not give probation and parole doesn’t happen fast (and there are other consequences of a deadly weapon finding). Not only the person throwing the bleach bomb, but all those who are parties to the crime by encouraging or aiding or attempting to aid the person will be guilty of the crime. Prosecutors could charge someone who encouraged bleach bombs with a crime that could absolutely destroy their life. Perhaps the police should take the time to stop this now before someone is blinded. It is a serious matter.
    ———-
    “Deadly weapon” means:
    (A) a firearm or anything manifestly designed, made, or adapted for the purpose of inflicting death or serious bodily injury; or
    (B) anything that in the manner of its use or intended use is capable of causing death or serious bodily injury.
    —–
    (46) “Serious bodily injury” means bodily injury that creates a substantial risk of death or that causes death, serious permanent disfigurement, or protracted loss or impairment of the function of any bodily member or organ.
    ———-
    (8) “Bodily injury” means physical pain, illness, or any impairment of physical condition.
    ———
    Sec. 22.02. AGGRAVATED ASSAULT. (a) A person commits an offense if the person commits assault as defined in Sec. 22.01 and the person:
    (1) causes serious bodily injury to another, including the person’s spouse; or
    (2) uses or exhibits a deadly weapon during the commission of the assault.
    (b) An offense under this section is a felony of the second degree,….
    ——–
    Sec. 22.01. ASSAULT. (a) A person commits an offense if the person:
    (1) intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causes bodily injury to another, including the person’s spouse;
    (2) intentionally or knowingly threatens another with imminent bodily injury, including the person’s spouse; or
    (3) intentionally or knowingly causes physical contact with another when the person knows or should reasonably believe that the other will regard the contact as offensive or provocative.
    ——–
    Art. 42.014. FINDING THAT OFFENSE WAS COMMITTED BECAUSE OF BIAS OR PREJUDICE. (a) In the trial of an offense under Title 5, Penal Code, or Section 28.02, 28.03, or 28.08, Penal Code, the judge shall make an affirmative finding of fact and enter the affirmative finding in the judgment of the case if at the guilt or innocence phase of the trial, the judge or the jury, whichever is the trier of fact, determines beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant intentionally selected the person against whom the offense was committed or intentionally selected property damaged or affected as a result of the offense because of the defendant’s bias or prejudice against a group identified by race, color, disability, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, gender, or sexual preference.
    (b) The sentencing judge may, as a condition of punishment, require attendance in an educational program to further tolerance and acceptance of others.
    (c) In this article, “sexual preference” has the following meaning only: a preference for heterosexuality, homosexuality, or bisexuality.
    Sec. 12.47. PENALTY IF OFFENSE COMMITTED BECAUSE OF BIAS OR PREJUDICE. (a) If an affirmative finding under Article 42.014, Code of Criminal Procedure, is made in the trial of an offense other than a first degree felony or a Class A misdemeanor, the punishment for the offense is increased to the punishment prescribed for the next highest category of offense. If the offense is a Class A misdemeanor, the minimum term of confinement for the offense is increased to 180 days…..
    ——-
    Judge Ordered Community Supervision

    Sec. 3. (a) A judge, in the best interest of justice, the public, and the defendant, after conviction or a plea of guilty or nolo contendere, may suspend the imposition of the sentence and place the defendant on community supervision or impose a fine applicable to the offense and place the defendant on community supervision.
    Sec. 3g.
    (a) The provisions of Section 3 of this article do not apply:
    (2) to a defendant when it is shown that a deadly weapon as defined in Section 1.07, Penal Code, was used or exhibited during the commission of a felony offense or during immediate flight therefrom, and that the defendant used or exhibited the deadly weapon or was a party to the offense and knew that a deadly weapon would be used or exhibited.
    ——–
    Sec. 7.02. CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR CONDUCT OF ANOTHER. (a) A person is criminally responsible for an offense committed by the conduct of another if:
    (1) acting with the kind of culpability required for the offense, he causes or aids an innocent or nonresponsible person to engage in conduct prohibited by the definition of the offense;
    (2) acting with intent to promote or assist the commission of the offense, he solicits, encourages, directs, aids, or attempts to aid the other person to commit the offense; or
    (3) having a legal duty to prevent commission of the offense and acting with intent to promote or assist its commission, he fails to make a reasonable effort to prevent commission of the offense.
    (b) If, in the attempt to carry out a conspiracy to commit one felony, another felony is committed by one of the conspirators, all conspirators are guilty of the felony actually committed, though having no intent to commit it, if the offense was committed in furtherance of the unlawful purpose and was one that should have been anticipated as a result of the carrying out of the conspiracy.
    ———-
    Sec. 12.32. FIRST DEGREE FELONY PUNISHMENT. (a) An individual adjudged guilty of a felony of the first degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for life or for any term of not more than 99 years or less than 5 years.
    (b) In addition to imprisonment, an individual adjudged guilty of a felony of the first degree may be punished by a fine not to exceed $10,000.
    ————-
    (d) An inmate serving a sentence for an offense described by
    Section 3g(a)(1)(A), (C), (D), (E), (F), (G), or (H), Article
    42.12, Code of Criminal Procedure, or for an offense for which the
    judgment contains an affirmative finding under Section 3g(a)(2) of
    that article, is not eligible for release on parole until the
    inmate’s actual calendar time served, without consideration of good
    conduct time, equals one-half of the sentence or 30 calendar years,
    whichever is less, but in no event is the inmate eligible for
    release on parole in less than two calendar years.

    0
  3. If bleach can blind, a bleach bomb is a deadly weapon. If unwanted touching is assault, unwanted touching with a deadly weapon might be a second degree felony. If it is done out of racial prejudice, it can be enhanced to a first degree felony and a judge may not give probation and parole doesn’t happen fast (and there are other consequences of a deadly weapon finding). Not only the person throwing the bleach bomb, but all those who are parties to the crime by encouraging or aiding or attempting to aid the person will be guilty of the crime. Prosecutors could charge someone who encouraged bleach bombs with a crime that could absolutely destroy their life. Perhaps the police should take the time to stop this now before someone is blinded. It is a serious matter.

    0
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