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Alpha Gamma Delta – The University of Alabama (Facebook)

Let’s be honest, the University of Alabama isn’t known for its love of “diversity”.  So I’m not sure why it’s so shocking to learn that certain sororities on the UA campus won’t pledge black recruits. The Crimson White (CW) recently wrote an expose on four sororities that blocked two black women from pledging. Allegedly, alumnae members of  Alpha Gamma DeltaTri DeltaChi Omega and Pi Beta Phi didn’t want to tarnish their “history” by offering bids to the black women in question.

In “The Final Barrier: 50 years later, segregation still exists,” CW reporters Abbey Crain and Matt Ford report that Alpha Gamma Delta members were told during recruitment that the sorority would not be voting on potential new members because the chapter had already agreed on who would make the cut.

According to the CW, sorority member Melanie Gotz raised her hand and asked, “Are we not going to talk about the black girl?”

The girl, according to the CW, should have been a prime candidate — a “4.3 GPA in high school, was salutatorian of her graduating class and comes from a family with deep roots in local and state public service and a direct link to The University of Alabama.”

The two black woman in question have preferred to remain anonymous due to the backlash they’re afraid of receiving.

In response to the allegations against one of the sororities involved, Whitney Heckathorne, director of communications for Chi Omega nationals, said, “Our membership policy embraces women from different ethnic, religious and racial backgrounds. Our sole membership criteria is that our members live and reflect Chi Omega values, and so I can speak from the national standpoint that certainly singling out someone because of race is not something that would reflect Chi Omega’s ideals.”

Maybe the white sororities at the University of Alabama could learn something from the University’s National Pan-Hellenic Council, composed of traditionally African-American greek organizations, who have no problem in having diverse pledges. According to a 2011 article in The Crimson White, Zeta Phi Beta pledged white member Eve Dempsey in the spring of 2007, after integrating in the 1980s. Maybe the two black women in question should look into black greek organizations. Inclusion isn’t always the easiest thing, especially when it’s only been 50 years since the first black student was allowed on University of Alabama’s campus.

  • Anthony

    What is the problem? What black oriented woman would want to pledge one of these sororities? Let those white girls alone, and go be a Zeta, AKA, Delta, Sigma Gamma Rho, or whatever.

  • Kaeli

    I have to agree. I know we want to create a utopia where all are welcome everywhere but this just screams to me of black people who for some reason need to be accepted my whites. If you don’t want me I am going to keep it moving and live my life with and around people who make me feel welcome and included. Life is too damn short to be worrying about if white people like me or want me in their social club. Now let that mess start messing with my money or my ability to live well and we will have a problem.

  • Brad

    I know there are simply too many great black female sororities to join for them to put up with an organization who doesn’t want them.

    I mean what kind of sister hood do they think would have in this sorority?
    What kind of connections do they really think they’re going to get if there made members?

    I hope the issue isn’t that they turned their noses up at the AKA’s, Delta’s or Zeta’s.

  • Karyn

    I don’t know if it’s still called pledging now-a-days…ahem…but she could have tried a go with one of the Latin sororities as well. I guess she wanted to TRY it out. Hmmmm.

  • http://www.lillian-mae.com Knotty Natural

    They should sue for discrimination and start their own sorority chapters, if they don’t exist already.

  • Candice

    Um… We have our own sororities committed to helping OUR communities!!!
    OOOOO-OOP!

  • Kaeli

    Exactly! I am all for fighting racism but when black people reject their own people for white people they want other black people to stand and fight with them. Heck no!! When you reject black people and are met by racist white people I have no desire to help.

  • http://gravatar.com/geenababe geenababe

    I don’t know, I wouldn’t have tired out for an all white soroity in the first place. I’m guessing that maybe the school didn’t have any black sororities and they really wanted to be apart of one…I don’t know.

  • Karyn

    ^5!!

  • MimiLuvs

    Off topic:
    Just by reading this article, a thought popped into my head about black, women students and attending PWI colleges. I wonder if they really weighed the ‘pros and cons’ about attending such school. From my viewpoint, some universities’ policies give off the mindset of “black folks ain’t welcome here unless you’re playing a sport here” and usually those student-athletes are men.

  • http://gravatar.com/geenababe geenababe

    @ myself
    I mean tried not tired

  • WhatIThink

    Nothing wrong with appreciating other folks and cultures but the whole point of civil rights is to appreciate yourself, your people and your own culture first and foremost.

    Some people act as if that means forgetting all of that and just blindly assimilating.

    Bad bad bad.

  • Brad

    Yea, some universities are more diverse than others. But, it does seem odd on some of these campuses needing Black student unions and such. I mean it seems that in some cases you have to work extra hard just to coexist at some of these universities.

    I mean read this except about some of the goings on at FSU these days:

    “With the hope of easing the freshman transition from high school to college, Florida State University’s Black Student Union (BSU) will hold their first-ever pep rally this Friday, 6 p.m. at the Tully Gym. The inaugural pep rally’s theme is “Bridging the Gap.”

    “Once you leave high school you just jump right into college, and we just wanted to allow the freshman to transition; like an official last pep rally,” Johnson said.

    In light of recent events involving FSU student, Mandy Thurston, BSU leaders aim to bridge a gap they believe exists between Florida State and Florida A&M University students. The event will encourage greater acceptance of the city of Tallahassee’s diverse makeup.”

  • MimiLuvs

    re: the actual post

    I wouldn’t be surprise if the members of this sorority are attending strolls and step shows that are put on by black fraternities and sororities.

  • http://ladyngo.blogspot.com Lady Ngo

    I’m certainly not the kind of person who believes that if you’re black you should automatically only consider D9 (afterall, i’m in a Multicultural GLO rather than a BGLO) but i would definitely be interested in knowing why these two women wanted to join those particular orgs. No shade to the Panhel sororites but i don’t see what the draw would be, especially for a black woman…and at that school with that kind of history.

  • Sylvie

    Ugh. I can’t believe I am going to type anything in defense of Greek organizations as personally, I am opposed to paying people to be my friends (or beat me up) BUT there is a difference between what the national organization does and what the local chapters do,

    At my school, a sorority that was literally 99% Jewish at the local level was probably 97% international/latina at the national level. So it’s great for the Chi O national folks to make a statement but you need the bigots at the local level to speak to get a true sense of what’s going on.

  • SAA

    And in other news, water is wet.

  • MommieDearest

    Cosign!

    I can’t get behind black folks who continue to beg white folks for acceptance. Get some pride about yourself. Damb.

  • LemonNLime

    I don’t think these girls should be given crap because they wanted to join a white sorority. I’m most definitely anti-Greek because I refuse to pay for friends or to have the crap beat out of me but I came close to joining one in college and it was a white sorority.

    I went to a PWI but I have VERY strong family connections to AKA and Delta. The AKAs and Deltas on my campus were a MESS. They were constantly getting in trouble for hazing, they were loud and disrespectful, rude, materialistic, and arrogant. That was not anything that I wanted my name attached to no matter how many of my family members were in the organization (and honestly, some of those family members exhibited the same traits of these girls on campus).

    I had a friend who was the VP of her sorority and so I was alway hearing about the things that her sorority was doing and I was impressed. The organization was very active in the local community, campus government, and had high academic standards. She asked me if I would like to go through the process of joining and I had to really debate it. I even found black women who were apart of this organization at different chapters to find out their opinions and why the chose it over one of the D9. In the end, I decided against it not because they were white but because I wanted to save my money to travel and I could do volunteer servie on my own but if I wasn’t interested in studying abroad and traveling, I probably would have joined.

    What I’m saying is you don’t know what was their reason for pledging this organization; not every issue has to do with “self-hate”.

  • Rose

    Maybe the two black girls will learn a lesson: white people do NOT want us around. Stop whining when you realize that they are not going to embrace us and hold our hands. It’s embarrassing how butt-hurt black people are constantly throwing fits over white people not rolling out the welcome mat for them. Always wanting to get in good with the white folks little clubs and organizations, and begging for acceptance as a sign of ‘making it’. “Oh, white Massa please like me! I love you, please say you love me toooooo!”

  • Brad

    Sounds like you not comfortable around black woman if you ask me and I am sorry I just ain’t ready to buy that the AKA’s and Delta’s were so ghetto and loud.

    I know I may sound like I am taking offense but, I was rasied by an AKA no apologies. I have never met a more finer representation of black woman than some of the ones you find in our black sororities.

  • Candice

    I went to a PWI just graduated in May. I did weigh the pros and cons. In my state there were 2 HBCUs within 30 mins of my house were all of my high school classmates went. The others didn’t give me good scholarships. I wanted to go to Clark Atlanta soooo bad but that out of state tuition was killer so I went to the school that gave me money and was still pretty close to home but far enough that I wasn’t always with the same people I’ve known my whole life. I’m a Greek but I think the experience would have been a whole lot different at a black school. We didn’t get much love from the school honestly but we were still great. If I could do it all over again idk that I would have chosen a different school because I had so many awesome opportunities and the city was beautiful but I would have thought a little harder about it for sure.

  • LemonNLime

    Oh so you have met EVERY AKA and Delta walking God’s green Earth?

    Just because the women that you were raised by might have sense doesn’t mean that they are representative of all AKAs and Deltas just like the trashy ones at my university weren’t representatives of the entire organization. However, since that was the chapter that was available at MY school, I didn’t want to be associated with such foolishness.

    Oh, and it sounds like I’m not comfortable around black women? That sounds like a stupid response by someone who doesn’t take kindly to people who don’t worships these organizations. But I guess would discount someone’s experience if I had drank the Greek Kool-aid too.

  • MimiLuvs

    “Sounds like you not comfortable around black woman if you ask me and I am sorry I just ain’t ready to buy that the AKA’s and Delta’s were so ghetto and loud…”

    I have met a few sorority members (of the Divine Nine) who have behaved in an unflattering/uncouth manner. So I believe in LemonNLime’s testimony.
    I do believe that you are more offended about her diction than about her feelings of the sororities that were on her college campus.

  • LemonNLime

    Oh so you have met EVERY AKA and Delta walking God’s green Earth?

    Just because the women that you were raised by might have sense doesn’t mean that they are representative of all AKAs and Deltas just like the trashy ones at my university weren’t representatives of the entire organization. However, since that was the chapter that was available at MY school, I didn’t want to be associated with such foolishness.

    Oh, and it sounds like I’m not comfortable around black women? That sounds like a stupid response by someone who doesn’t take kindly to people who don’t worships these organizations. But I guess would discount someone’s experience if I drank the Greek Kool-aid too.

  • Brad

    I havn’t met everyone but, I have met hundreds of them and I know what the nation chapters want represented.

    I am not greek myself didn’t pledge Kappa as my father did, niether did either of my brothers. So I am the last person to worship a greek organization.

    But, I am black all day and I am weary, tired and suspect of black people putting down black organizations and institutions in favor of white ones. Organizations that have been putting in work for us for over a hundred years.

  • Brad

    Maybe your right but, I am a little tired of hearing black folks attacking black organizations/institutions in favor of white organizations/institutions.

  • LemonNLime

    Thank you! And I’m sure you noticed that I didn’t not say “ghetto”, he did. That would be to simplistic and stereotypical of a description. Maybe he is the one with the discomfort around black people and should consider the language he is using.

  • Kaeli

    I think your story shows the perspective of someone who might join a predominately white sorority but I think the difference between your story and this one is you were asked to join by someone high up in the organization. You also took the time to do some research to see if you would be accepted. If you had done that same research and not found one black woman who had been a part of this organization would you have considered it?

  • Sheena

    I attended a PWC after weight the pros and cons considerably. I loved my experience. It’s not that I didn’t consider the possibility of going to a HBCU, I just decided to go with the school that gave me the scholarships. Also because the city I’m from is a mixture of races. I wasn’t raised in a predominately black neighborhood, so I wanted some of that same diversity when I went to college.

    Never had any major race issues. There were little moments here and there (some unknown fool spray painted swastikas on some buildings my first year; some white kids feeling superior like they needed to grade check and compare themselves to you academically) but overall it was actually great. We also had a strong Black Student Union so we all felt welcomed and would have our own parties, meetings, and other social gatherings. We knew how to handle those situations without letting the ignorant white students get the best of us or ruin our experience. The same as one would do in the real world.

    I think that because of instances like this (in the article) some of us get the idea that going to a PWC is like stepping back into the 1800s. And it’s not like that for everybody. Some college’s do only see black males who can play a sport as a commodity, but that doesn’t mean they will make student life a living hell for other black students. That’s why college visits are so important. Visit on days when there is no official schedule for it. Ask the students questions. Ask if there is a BSU. Investigate before you sign on to go to just any old PWC.

  • MimiLuvs

    @Brad

    IMO, LemonNLime’s message did come off as if she was down-grading black greek organizations in order to praise the white ones.
    She was actually offering a different perspective as to why these two Alabama students wanted to join a predominantly white sorority.

  • LemonNLime

    I said “I’m most definitely anti-Greek because I refuse to pay for friends or to have the crap beat out of me”. I didn’t put down the entire D9, if anything I put down all Greek orgs. whilst mentioning the characteristic of the 2 organization on MY campus.

    Personally I believe that most campus Greek orgs. are nothing but expensive gangs and bacchanals, whether they are black, white, latino, or asian. And while I can acknowledge that contributions the D9 may have made, that doesn’t negate the fact that many of these organizations also have a colorist and classist history of practices.

    And this, “I am black all day..”, yea you and every other black person… we don’t just change colors like lizards and it doesn’t make your argument more valid.

    Your experiences are not representative of mine. Get over it.

  • Brad

    “were loud and disrespectful, rude, materialistic, and arrogant”

    - OK Ghetto is a more simplistic term for what you described, short hand if you were. As far as being comfortable around black people. Raised in a black neighboorhood, member of a black church, graduated from a HBCU(Tuskegee Univ), daughters mandated to attended an HBCU. I think I am more than just a little comfortable around my own.

    But, fair enough I am not greek nor a member of a black sorority so maybe it would be better that actually members spoke out for there organizations. I can only relay the experiences I have seen with them. One of class and dignity from black woman my mothers age(Althea Gibson was her line sister), to young black woman I witness when ever I am back on the yard.

  • Evie

    I’m so tired of reading this argument. Where are these spaces where Black people are wanted? Because personally, everywhere I go I raise hackles: work, the grocery store, the doctors office… If I only went where I was wanted, I’d have nowhere to go.

    So for me, I’ll always tread on white peoples’ toes when given the chance, everyday and twice on Sunday. Not because I love them and want them to love me back (nothing so naive), but because it is my right. Not one Black person who ever integrated a white space did it because they loved white people or wanted to be loved by them. They did it because it was their right to do it.

  • LemonNLime

    That is a good question. If I had not found other black women and talked to them about their experiences (many of which got a lot of crap from their family members I might add), I would not have even considered it. It was because of talking them that I continued to look into the organization. I really researched the history of this organization and it’s founders values; I also looked at their history of diversity.

    In the end, it was just more important for me to be able to travel and study abroad. Also, like I said I’ve never been into Greek organizations so I think it says a lot about this chapter on my campus that I even considered it.

  • Brad

    Fair enough but, forgive me if I can’t get behind why at this late date two black woman would want to beg for acceptance from people who have no interest in them.

    It just seems crazy to me…

  • LemonNLime

    That is a good question. If I had not found other black women and talked to them about their experiences (many of which got a lot of crap from their family members I might add), I would not have even considered it. It was because of talking them that I continued to look into the organization. I really researched the history of this organization and it’s founders values; I also looked at their history of diversity.

    In the end, it was just more important for me to be able to travel and study abroad. Also, like I said I’ve never been into Greek organizations so I think it says a lot about this chapter on my campus that I even considered it.

  • LemonNLime

    Sorry this was a reply to Kaeli’s question. My replies are just all over the place!

  • Brad

    There is a differnce “in work, the grocery store, the doctors office” and in the year 2013 fighting to join a all white organization that has a policy not to accept people like our selves.

    Ain’t no reason to try and be Jackie Robinson in the 21st century, there is too much postiive work that can be done for our selves.

  • L

    I agree with LemonNLime.
    Many of these Divine 9 greek organizations do not embody the principles of thier founding members. They are so worried about image instead of truly serving the black community. Many of them don’t choose to live in black neighborhoods after graduating and he!! some don’t even graduate yet they have letters. At a national level, yes there are some very accomplished women that have greek letters but lets face it, many of the members these days are just a member to say they are a member.

  • Marisa

    No not a school called the University of ALABAMA really no not them, what next Ole Miss, Univ of Texas lol. This is exactly why places like HBCU’s are important or if not going that route is what you want, then those Black Student Unions are important as well for students at PWI’s. Whites sometimes tend to send messages on occasion if you listen closely. Which is the law says they have to allow black people to be here we just don’t have to make yall feel welcome, and that my friends is the bottom line. Its ironic that these Black Greek pledges are letting in non blacks but, we don’t receive the same consideration.

    It’s all lip service which is what its really all about, and that’s why The United States of America will continue to be ass backwards in regards to race. I bet my bottom dollar the same ones white one’s who don’t want blacks involved in their social settings, are the same ones who b%tch and moan about Blacks having their own pledges, how come there is a BET but no WET, why is there a Black Girls Rock award show but no white girls one, bottom line I don’t associate with any social setting that aint feelin me. Let them continue being all white, who needs them.

  • Anthony

    I am certain that the University of Alabama has black sororities. I attended two similar traditionally white schools in the South, and there were plenty of Black Greeks.

  • Brad

    All that being said and there being some truth to it, although some of these organiztions are more visible in our community than the NAACP or the Urban League.

    But, all that being said, I know that my daughters will benifit far more socially from the AKA’s than they ever would from some of there girlfriends in the hood. The ones that stayed home and started having babies. The ones getting with boyfriends who are now locked up.

    The battles of rasiing a young black female today are intense. Fighting against the images of “what a black woman” is suppose to look like, is suppose to at like.

    Pledging and becomming a member of AKA and having a sister hood amoung those young future leaders will simply give them a far more positive perspective on what it is to be a black woman.

    But, maybe I am wrong but, I don’t think so. Watching those young black woman lock arms, gather around, form a circle and singing after there graduation ceremony is a positive image that will always stick with me.

  • http://yeshacallahan.com Yesha Callahan

    You are correct. They have a strong black Greek presence.

  • Rose

    @ Evie – A private club or extracurricular organization has little to do with one’s livelihood compared to the way healthcare or employment does. If a bunch of white people unanimously decide that they don’t want to be your friends because you are black, are you going to cry? Go tell mommy and daddy that the white folks don’t like you? If white folks saying “You can’t join our sorority” effects your life to the same degree that a lack of healthcare or fair employment would, then you value that sorority way too much. If someone is upset about losing out on a job due to discrimination, I understand that. The value is in the job position and economic gain, which is crucial to being financially sound in this country, or almost anywhere in the world. A social group like a sorority, however, places the value on the people (in this case the white girls), friendship, maybe networking and the community within that group. That is what was denied to these girls (by a group of people that apparently don’t like black folks to begin with), not something crucial like much-needed medicine from a doctor or a fair trial from a jury. It is FOOLISH to value the companionship of strangers as much as something that ensures your livelihood.
    ———————————
    Anyway, what black person would want to kick it with a bunch of white people in Alabama anyway? You trying to die?

  • Rose

    Yes! I am wondering why these girls were so interested in joining a white sorority, especially one in the south, as opposed to one of the black ones.

    Did they forget that they’re black? Black sororities have a fantastic network of high achievers and long histories, why pass that up?

  • https://www.facebook.com/kelley.johnson.75436 Kelley Johnson

    Why in the world would anyone want to be in a sorority with a bunch of racist white women? Why? When do black folks stop begging for white people to love and respect us? SMH.

  • http://gravatar.com/nolakiss16 binks

    Why is anybody surprised? I notice this with most white sororities and fraternities especially if they are older in nature. Most either have a VERY small percentage of non-white member (who are usually Asian) or none at all. Personally, I don’t think the black girls should be faulted, were they naïve yes in some ways but at the same time we don’t know why these girls were attracted to this particularly sorority. Maybe it is one of the most active on campus; maybe their objectives matched theirs, etc. Yes people usually say we shouldn’t beg to be accepted or go to our own but that reasoning is letting racist people and white supremacy win in the end because you are basically giving them an excuse to continue their racist status quo indirectly. I attended a PWC in the south and they had black sororities, white sororities and even a multi-cultural sorority, I had the option to join a black one and a white one (it was a new sorority on campus) but I decided not to pledge either mainly because I wanted to focus on my studies and I still think the best time to get into a sorority/fraternity is in grad school if you so choose.

  • L

    ok Brad let’s go through your list,
    “some of these organiztions are more visible in our community than the NAACP or the Urban League”

    Not in my community. Many of the events thrown by these organizations are private networking socials which proves them to be all about image. I went to one and was bored out of my mind.

    “I know that my daughters will benifit far more socially from the AKA’s than they ever would from some of there girlfriends in the hood. The ones that stayed home and started having babies. The ones getting with boyfriends who are now locked up.”

    So being an AKA excludes a person from having a child “early” or dating a person that gets locked up? people are so brainwashed. I’d rather my daughter be able to think for herself and choose friends that compliment her personality and morals. Greek letters have nothing to do with they way a child turns out. There are plenty of greek sluts out here.

    “Pledging and becomming a member of AKA and having a sister hood amoung those young future leaders will simply give them a far more positive perspective on what it is to be a black woman.”

    This is just wrong. There’s a problem if it takes joining a greek organization for your child to see the positive attributes of being a black woman. and from my experience, THESE DAYS, the true creme of the crop on campus never pledge any organization (i.e. Michelle Obama & Barack Obama)

    “Watching those young black woman lock arms, gather around, form a circle and singing after there graduation ceremony is a positive image that will always stick with me.”

    I don’t doubt that this was a great sight to see. But to me, a better image would be the entire group of african american graduates singing “lift every voice and sing” after every graduation.

    Just my opinions though. From your comments i gather you were raised by an AKA and a Kappa so changing your mind is next to impossible.

  • BeanBean

    This is news??? I’ve always known that sororities are racially segregated, very few aren’t. At my school we have black sororities and we have white ones. There are a few girls who are Asian or Latina who are in either white or black ones. But I have yet to see a white girl in a black sorority or a black girl in a white one. I don’t like the idea of this type of segregation, so I’ve always had a disdain for sororities to begin with..

  • Brad

    Ha, to be honest my wife also a graduate of a HBCU did not pledge herself for many of the same arguments you gave.

    So I do and can understand your points ;-)

    I just happen to think that there is more positive than negative in these organizations is all.

  • Dee

    White people refuse to let a black girl in their sororities but if a white girl wanted to join ours we’d be quick to let her in. I have seen other races in black greek societies but white people prefer to maintain their pure white membership. It’s ridiculous. We need to stop trying to join their stuff and be accepted by them, it’s not worth it.

  • copelli

    Aaaaaaaaaaa-mennnnnnnnnnnnn!

    :o)

  • WhatIThink

    I think some of the comments here reflect the fact that most people don’t know the history of most of these organizations. They are simply microcosms of the larger culture. The funniest part being that their lore and traditions are more secret than the black Greeks because the black Greeks make a show out of everything. On the other hand these other organizations have the power, wealth and influence and don’t need to put on shows all the time. This is one of the “keys” that most black folks miss in the whole concept of these groups. what power and wealth to black societies have ANYWHERE secret or otherwise?

  • http://gravatar.com/geenababe geenababe

    Thanks for clearing it up because I didn’t know about this school. I have ran out of reasons why they could have wanted to join an all-white sorority,

  • meli

    the white hate is real……im all for standing up for my race but not hating somebody else nobody wants to be excluded and racism is indeed still alive.. but sheesh do we have to have hate them…. this whole hate white people thing is getting on my nerves….

  • Tanya

    Why are people missing the point and accusing the two Black women of self-hate? My god, the lack of empathy is just astounding. The Black women pledged for a sorority… a historically all white sorority… they were discriminated against… it’s racism period point blank. The women didn’t disclose their names because they didn’t want any flack. I thought they didn’t want flack from white people.. but oh no…but I think it’s more than the whites… Black people are all about flogging them as well. Why didn’t they join a Black sorority? Who. Knows. Why does it matter? At the end of the day these women were discriminated against because they’re Black. I mean goodness… I hate the whole attitude that we have about, “OF COURSE THIS RACIST THING HAPPENED IN THE SOUTH” ladeedah snark… like it’s something we should accept rather than fight. No empathy. Yes, that makes total sense. Don’t be disgusted with the racist sorority… talk smack about the Black women who… got what’s coming to her. Gotcha. Also, do you even realize how important networking is in college? My goodness connections are important. Connections affect your livelihood. Some of these comments are just so… disconnected from reality. Some of you guys are projecting some ugliness onto these young women. You need to stop.

  • Jami

    These girls were laughably naive. Point blank. White people are notorious for discrimination and racism, particularly against black people. But if black folks wanna keep running to them with open arms, then let them. It’s like playing with fire and getting burned. Not much room for pity.

  • justanotheropinion

    U of ‘Bama was one of my daughters top college choices (pls, don’t go there – it was despite my misgivings and my schooling here about how things are ‘down there’). Made a visit there in Spring 2013 which was also the info session for soro’s (we had a tour and info session booked independently the next day for the school). After registration and drop off (at 5k+, largest group of young women interested in soros’s in Tide history). I was gone 20 mins when I got the text “get me the hell out of here”. Granted, her viewpoint was colored being from Cali, but this was beyond stupid. Stepford Wives doesn’t begin to describe the scene of the mothers & daughters we saw. All the girls dressed the same (a uniform) and the mothers, sadly, trying to dress the same while pretending to fit in, but 20+ yrs older (and honey, they showed their age). I was literally driving down soro row to pick her up (where house tours were being given), passenger door ajar with my child running out of one of the house tours, while diving into the car as I sped driving down the street as the other wannabe’s watched in dismay. Only after we got back to the safety of our hotel did she understand why someplace like this would never be a fit for her. (I tried to tell her that Momma knows…but you know how that goes). She couldn’t get out of town fast enough.

    This article doesn’t surprise me. I AM surprised by the comments to the original article as I would not have expected such a strong response that what was going on was wrong. Maybe there is is still hope – I won’t bank on it, but nice to see. At the end of the day, I can only say that ain’t nothing changed – white folk will always try to hang on to the past (i.e.segregation). Even if some are in protest – ain’t not a damn thing changed and it ain’t a party me or mine need to try to be invited to. or be part of. My heart goes out to the young black women that were just trying to do the college thing & pledge. I won’t hate on them or criticize them – I’m not in their shoes. I don’t blame them for keeping their names secret – there has been so much hate on this topic directed to them or the white soro’s that wouldn’t play to this, that I can see why they are worried about retribution. May be 2013 but could easily be 1913.

  • Tanya

    Of course white people are notorious for racism and discrimination. That goes without saying. But saying, not much room for pity. I am so sick of this mindset. Done. Finished. Again with the lack of outrage for the fact that, “…four sororities…blocked two black women from pledging. Allegedly, alumnae members of Alpha Gamma Delta, Tri Delta, Chi Omega and Pi Beta Phi didn’t want to tarnish their ‘history’ by offering bids to the black women in question”. This discussion on Clutch isn’t going to the white women’s jugular at all whatsoever. This is absolutely disturbing. This whole… man, who know how white people are… Black people shouldn’t even try… way of thinking. is. so, disconnected. from. reality. It’s. College! It’s life. We are always going to have to deal with white people. We are always going to have to go toe to toe with white supremacy. We are always going to have try to network with white people because it’s life. It is so disturbing that people are up in arms about the Black women who were ‘race traitors’ rather than the disgusting racism that these Black women had to deal with. This “what did they expect” way of thinking… is lazy and gross.

  • merytut

    WHY….ON…EARTH…WOULD a SANE Black woman want to purposely join them? #confused That’s sort of like feeling bad for two black women who were denied membership to the Klan.. -_- #sideeye

  • Monique

    It’s unfortunate that this happened. I am a Black woman that pledged a traditionally white sorority in college. I had a great college experience, and my sorority has provided me with irreplaceable connections and experiences. I have Black sorors and sorors of many other nationalities. I guess it depends on the school, because where I attended college ALL of the traditionally “white” sororities had Black and other non-white members. In hindsight, much of this was probably due to the fact that almost all of the traditionally Black frats/sororities were suspended or had few to zero active members on campus… but I guess the big difference here is I didn’t go to school in Alabama….

  • Bluboy

    It is wrong for everyone to assume that all these organizations are no good. Not every black person in a bglo is just send it to be seen. Some of us actually do things to help our community and reach out to our younger peers. Just the individuals, not the group as a whole. I have no problem with black people joining a predominantly white organization. It’s just something that never interested me because I was only interested in joining a Divine 9 organization. I also grew up in predominantly white neighborhoods. Let’s not ignore the fact that if what the sororities did is true, it’s completely wrong and unfair.

  • diasporauk

    Just pleases me no end when after a hard day’s bootlicking and miscellaneous treachery in their as job white supremacy’s washer women — “diversity” seeking (aka wannabe white) negros get a rejection slip instead of membership.

    Forever the trick, never the wife.

    :-)

  • Ms.Vee

    *rolls eyes and continues to pray for the day blacks stop being pitiful and begging for others to accept us into things we can achieve ourselves*.

  • Leo the Yardie Chick

    I’m from the Caribbean and the whole frat/soro thing is as foreign to me as seal meat. So I read what everyone here had to say, and then I went to the original article. It turns out that the members of the sorority where Miss 4.3 GPA pledged wanted her, but were overruled by the alumnae/Powers That Be. If that sorority is serious about integrating, then they need to get the ball rolling by petitioning to their national body and letting them know that something is rotten at U of Alabama, AND throwing their support loudly and publicly behind the two young women in question.

    IF they’re serious, that is. Standing up for the two will undoubtedly make them targets as well, but it will need to be done if they really want something more diverse than hair colours in their establishment. We’ll see how willing they are to do so, but I wouldn’t suggest holding your breaths,

    Personally, I, like a previous commentator’s daughter, would be sprinting as if Cujo and White Dog were chasing me had I witnessed half of what she saw, but this isn’t about me. This is about those two young women and what they thought they saw in these groups.

  • Allie

    Seconded. Deeply.

    I am where you are. Either we’re equal citizens, in all aspects of society (not just at work), or we’re not and that needs to get fixed. Otherwise, we’re just creating de facto segregation — which seems to be what some of the crowd here at clutch wants?? Blacks and whites only mixing from 9 to 5 inside the confines of an office building, then living with segregated lives, communities, social clubs, and engagements otherwise.

    Yeah, no. Not doing that.

  • Allie

    This type of argument is getting way out of control. I don’t give a monkey’s butt if “white people” want me around or not — if there’s a resource that *I* decide *I* want, or a thing *I* decide I want to do, I will fight for my ability to do it and be just as welcome as anyone else.

    White people also didn’t want us living in their nice white neighborhoods, or playing their nice white sports, or going to their nice white schools, or biking on their nice white bike paths or what the heck else ever.

    But guess what?

  • Allie

    But it sounds like several members DID have interest in them, and that a racist faction shut them down. So really, these girls were faced with the opportunity to either stand up for what they wanted, or let a bunch of bigots win and cow them into acquiescence.

  • chnyere

    Whoa, who said they turned their noses up at the blk sororities or that they were just searching for white approval. I know it may seem like this to yall, but you really don’t know, dang! What if the sorority had things blk sororities couldn’t offer them, like a house!?

    These girls should not be attacked, they didn’t do anything wrong.

  • http://twitter.com/Gr8Pizza Scott Allen (@Gr8Pizza)

    what about the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) at the University of Alabama

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