Yes, I Have A Black Name..Sort of..But So What?

by Yesha Callahan

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For the record, my name is pronounced I-esha. The “Y” as an “I”. But if you’d like to get specifics about my name, it has several different origins and meanings.  In Hindu culture, my name means “fame”, but if you take a look at in Hebrew, יש”ע, it means “salvation” and is also an acronym for Judea.

So there you have it, the various etymologies of my name.  But in this country, because I’m a black woman, with an “ethnic” name, my name is automatically labeled a “black name”. Guess what, I’m fine with that. I mean, I don’t have time to break down the etymology of my name all the damn time.  My siblings names are even more interesting. There’s Joshua, April and Khalilah. Two ethnic names, and two plain Jane names, my parents were random name pickers.  Hell, I could have been named August, if I was born on the first of August. That’s pretty much how they came up with my sister, April’s, name.

There’s always that question of “What’s in a name?” but nowadays it’s “Why do parents give black children such weird names?”.  That exact question was posed by a Reddit reader last week, to Black parents of Reddit:

“Before racism is called out, I have plenty of black friends. They, and their siblings have “normal” names, I.e. Justin, Jason, Chris, etc.

Just curious why you name your kids names like D’brickishaw, Barkevious D’quell (all NFL players first names) and so on. I don’t know 2 people in this world named Barkevious. Is it a “unique” thing? My black friends don’t know the answer so I’m asking the source .

I’m a minority too and I know all races have weird, uncommon names like apple and candy for white people, Jesus for Spanish, and so on.

Don’t get your panties in a bunch I just want a straight answer. I googled it and anytime someone asked, they get their heads ripped off so the Internet doesn’t have a straight answer yet.”

So you pose an antagonizing question, then state the old common “I have black friends” defense, and you don’t expect a shit storm to happen? Oh ok, dude. People were quick to site how “black” names could prevent people from getting jobs, others poked fun at names like Beyonce and Airwrecka, as well as stating that most black names can’t be proven to have African origins.

Daily Beast writer,  Jamelle Bouie, received a barrage of negative comments after his series of Tweets pointing out the double standards that exist between black and white names:

“Seriously, I will take your ‘questions’ about ‘weird’ black names seriously when you make fun of Reince Priebus and Rand Paul. White people giving their kids names like Saxby Chambliss and Tagg Romney is a clear sign of cultural pathology.” If names like “DeShawn” and “Shanice” are fair targets for ridicule, then the same should be true for “Saxby” and “Tagg.”

Here are a few of the responses:

So, names like Jamelle, Mo’nique, [and] Trayvon are normal?” asked one self-proclaimed conservative. Likewise, another asked if “Jamelle, LaShonda, Trayvon, etc. are signs of advanced, successful, economically stable and crime free culture?”, which was followed by someone wondering if “names like LaShaniqua, Jamal, Porsche, Mercedes” would be our “future leaders.”

Future leaders, huh?

Well there is that dude named, Barack.  I sort of remember this woman named Condoleeza. Now if those aren’t  examples of how names didn’t keep people from becoming leaders, I don’t know what is.

Like Bouie stated, apparently these so-called “black” names are treated inferior.  So it’s completely fine for a kid to walk around with the name “Apple”, but “Laquan” isn’t? Dweeezil, is completely fine.  Shaniqua, oh that’s ghetto.  A few months ago I noticed someone on Facebook posting the name of their new son, I had to raise an eyebrow. Skywalker? Really, dude?  You can name your child after a Star Wars character and no one raises an eyebrow. Now that’s what you call white privilege.

So to answer the Reddit user’s original question, “Just curious why you name your kids names like D’brickishaw, Barkevious D’quell (all NFL players first names) and so on”, it’s because they can.

 

Clutchettes, what do you think about so-called “black” names, or parents being creative when it comes to their child’s name?

  • http://daratmathis.wordpress.com dtafakari

    My parents were Africanists and I got the Pan-African name treatment twice over. I was long ashamed of it until I grew up and realized that they put so much thought into naming me: to reflect on hope.” I am proud of my names. Anyone who has problems with it can keep my name out their mouth.

  • http://www.lillian-mae.com Knotty Natural

    Eh…to each her own, but at the very least, the child should be able to pronounce and spell their own name.

  • MimiLuvs

    “Clutchettes, what do you think about so-called “black” names, or parents being creative when it comes to their child’s name?”

    Well, naturally, it’s none of my business when it comes to parents naming their children. But, I do wish (secretly) that parents will name their children with names that “means something” to them. I have a relative who had named her daughter ‘Ximena’ because she wanted to name her daughter with a name that has the letter ‘X’. Sure, her explanation did make me roll my eyes, but I didn’t throw out suggestions and tell her that her daughter’s name was (insert insulting adjective).
    What “people” (mainly white people and bougie black folks) need to realize is that their “normal” names were once considered “weird”.

  • Orange Starr Happy Hunting

    I heard that!

  • MimiLuvs

    @dtafakari

    You’re lucky.
    When I was a kid, I disliked my name. I thought that it was “too ordniary” (it’s Michelle).
    I preferred if my parents had given me a name that was ecletic. Then I learned the origin behind my name. I was named after my father (his name is Michael) as in I was the ‘junior’ (my older brother is the junior actually, so I would be ‘the Third’). My godmother and my paternal grandmother thought that it was a great idea. Now, for me, it is extra special because both women has passed away.

  • Orange Starr Happy Hunting

    I do not think there is anything wrong with a “black” name. i know some people have problems with names like Quvenzhané etc but I never did. Why can’t we as Black American people be creative and proud of names unique to our culture?
    Why do we have to forever dilute and assimilate?

    My whole name is unique, and I loves it, so do many other people…… my first name brings to mind either Africa or the Asian Pacific but my Dad came across it in Nice LOL

  • KG

    I can’t really form a full paragraph because my thoughts are all over the place on this one, so I will just use dashes

    - I hate Reddit, too many closet racists with “black friends.” And I already know who their black friends are – Carlton Banks, Chris Turk, and Skeeter Valentine.

    - Jesus is a common name in Hispanic culture. Apparently, it’s after Jesus Christ, and second it’s pronounced “Hey-Zeus”

    - I’ve been clowning Reince Priebus’ name for years. He sounds like he should be a unicorn or some other creature in Narnia.

    - Regardless of what Ron Paul says, I know Rand Paul was named after author Ayn Rand, who was pro-choice…

    - I don’t feel either way about Beyonce, but I never had a problem with her or Solange’s name

    - Let’s add Oprah to the list with Barak and Condoleeza. Her name was originally Orpah, a name found in the bible.

    - I really need white people to calm down with Star Wars. When you state that your religion is Jedi and walk around in a large yeti/dog costume and think you’re still normal, you need some kind of psychiatric help.

  • 1989

    I totally agree with Mr. Bouie’s point, even if he could have given better examples (‘Reince’ is German, Saxby’s first name is Clarence, and Rand is short for Randall). Some better ones would have been Moxie Crimefighter, Pilot Inspektor, and Zuma Nesta, as well as Reyghan, and Bear Blu. Even if these names are terrible, sadly, no one would ever judge one of these kids as immediately and as harshly as they would a black kid from the same socio-economic background named Tyquell or JaMarcus.

  • JS

    As far as names that are linked to a culture’s history I have no problem with. However its the misspellings that get me. Airwrecka for Erica is just plain ignorant.

  • CNG

    Hmmmm… Ive always wondered if I had a “black name”. Ive always wonder if when people receive my resume they just automatically assume Im black…

    My name is Chanel btw

  • CNG

    Well let my clarify my comment. I know my name is french but Ive always wondered if people associate my name with me automatically being a black girl.

  • Ladydivadynasty

    Why is Mrecedes a black/ethnic name? The car was named after an Austrian daughter….it was a girl’s name BEFORE it was a car. Porshe was also a last name. I am so tired of people classifying and judging each other non-stop. Exhausting.

  • JS

    Nope. Only girl I know named “Chanel” is white and actually spells it “Channel” LOL.

  • sixfoota

    *deep sigh*

    Whenever folks talk about black names, they always like to counter it by saying ‘why can’t you just name your child a normal name’? Question is, WHAT’S normal? What they’re really saying is take a white-american hundred year old name & name your child that. IE Washington, Ashley, Carter, Brandon. So, what you REALLY want me to do is assimilate. You want me to denounce my heritage (black American names such as Kesha, Latonya, Kenya, Jerome, Tyrone, etc) & use an over-used white American name. Naw, I’m good on that. And we should ALL be good on that. Name your child what you want & spell it how you want to spell it.

    One thing I also hear is ‘don’t name your child names hard to pronounce & spell’. If they can learn to spell Brandon they can learn to spell Myiesha. All of the letters are part of the same alphabet Brandon is from. So, yeah, that’s not an excuse.

    Another excuse: “Your child is not gonna get a job with that name”. Let’s say my name is Keshawndra. They look at my application & automatically know I’m a sista. No job interview. Alright. Now let’s say my name is Christina. They invite me for a interview. But as soon as they SEE I’m a sista, the same ideas forming in their head when they saw the name Keshawndra is going through their head once Christina walks through the door. You can’t win. If they don’t want to hire a black woman/man they’re gonna not hire you REGARDLESS of what your damn name is.

    We gotta stop beating ourselves up, y’all! Name your children what you want! And if you wanna make up a meaning for the name, do that. Start a tradition. ALL names were made up & given a meaning. Every. Single. Name. Start ya own tradition!

  • Girl CJ

    Anything associated with blackness is usually made out to be stupid, non-sense, bad, etc. There’s nothing more to it. People talk badly about the DeKarios and Ramieshas of the world because they are black, and they leave the Trigs, Fleets, and Dristans of the world alone (or at most there are just questions as to why their parents named them that as opposed to why White people name their kids those types of names)

  • apple

    i’m sorry i hate my ghetto made up name, and that what it was, a made of name with no history, no reasoning, nothing, just because my mom saw her teen mom students naming their new babies that and thought “oh thats trendy” . .i have spent my ENTIRE life explaining my name, my 10 LETTER NAME, i didn’t know how to spell my name correctly until i was 7! i have to keep pronouncing it to everyone OVER AND OVER and no one ever remembers it and everyone butchers it. my own father can’t spell my name, my family can’t spell my name. i actually think its effecting my job search. i have not used my legal name since i was 17, except when i have to. when i do prescriptions, phone calls , in which it requires my name i don’t even bother saying it, i just start spelling it because no one can spell it. just a couple months of go, a waiter took my credit card and looked at it with my ID and said “wow i guess your mother didn’t really care about you” i don’t care if that makes me look self hating or whatever, because i have to live with this shitty name always explaining it , if i knew what i knew now i would have legally changed it at 18 before all my past employers, internships,college diploma said it. and even now i think maybe it will be worth it. if i have kids, i won’t do that to them, i wanna make up a name ill give it to their middle name.

  • Non-woman policer

    All names are made up even Sally, Sarah and Melissa. The discrimination lies solely on black names. We have to embrace our culture not succomb to the roles assigned to us.

  • Me

    @CNG Would it be bad if the answer is yes, they can tell you’re black by your name? It always seems to me like the people who have a problem with black names (not saying that you do) only have a problem because it indicates that the person is black. It’s like everyone’s trying to trick people into thinking a white person is who they’re dealing with (“shh… don’t let them know you’re black until it’s too late for them to turn back”). I wonder if Maria, Jose, Carlos, Juanita, Consuela, or Felipe ever lament people knowing they’re Hispanic just by their names (since Hispanics are the next in line to set the US standards for everything).

  • Me

    Amen! I should’ve started and ended with your comment.

  • http://www.lillian-mae.com Lillian Mae

    The best thing about being 18 is you have the right to change your name! There are fees associated w/ it but if you think it’s affecting your chances at finding employment, it may be worth considering!

  • http://www.lillian-mae.com Lillian Mae

    I’m a Chanell too, and believe it or not I recently saw a white girl named Shanelle!

  • http://www.lillian-mae.com Lillian Mae

    Neither Porsche nor Mercedes are terribly bad, but there are some others…

    A women is named Marijuana Pepsi Jackson, why? She explained that those were her parents favorite things in the 70s…go figure!

  • https://www.facebook.com/kelley.johnson.75436 Kelley Johnson

    Is there a blacker name than Barack Obama?He did ok for himself.

  • naan

    I like African-American sounding names and I don’t understand why everyone can have names that indicate their ethnic background but for some reason it’s a problem if an African-American child has an African-American name.

    If it starts with a “La” and ends with an “A” WHAT is wrong with it?

    And if white people can name their children Rose, why cant we name ours Diamond?

    All of those stereotypes about African-American names are exactly that, STEREOTYPES. People should stop acting as if ONE awful sounding name represents all of us. Oh you came across a name with a subliminal message like Mary-J-Wanda, that I can understand why you roll your eyes but why is Maria, Lorenza, Jane and Terry better names than Tyrone, Aisha, Tameka, and Shanika? Oh you are afraid of not getting hired? Then go badger those who are profiling.

  • naan

    and how many children have you actually come across who couldn’t spell their own name? who couldn’t pronounce their own name?

    are you a teacher? was the issue their name was too long for YOU to have patience for to help teach?

    my child has a long name that is not native to English. he will LEARN how to write it and say it just like every other child.

  • A

    Sigh. But when a black person is given a “white” name like Jane, people take issue with that too. White folks being surprised a black person named “Jane” because lets be real, they usually expect something ‘different’ for a black person. Then black judging an asking “why you have such a white name for?” I spent a good bulk of my childhood being teased by my own race because my name is considered a white name. Name kids what you want. Theyre going to be judged for it either way.

  • naan

    oh and what about:
    Wolf (Blitzer)
    Skip (Bayless)
    Dick (Clark)
    Bill (O’reily)

    Minus the name of Dick Clark, I’m sure everybody knew those names also were names of animals, an action, and a note proving payment is needed.

    Bill is short for William, but so what— who thinks of BILL?!

    Now a legitimate “I have a problem with your name” argument is naming your children nicknames of the actual name.

    Name your child William not Bill. Joseph not Joe. Elizabeth not Liz. Samuel not Sam. Mohammed not Moe.

  • lizette

    I wish I could like your comment 1,000 times, seriously!

  • http://parentingbytheseatofmypants.wordpress.com greendoondoon

    Can I also add that Mercedes is a ultra-traditional Catholic Spanish name that means mercy? The man named the car after his daughter, not the other way around. Mercedes is a beautiful name.

    What about all of these white people naming their daughters names that sound like law firms? Mackenzie, Addison and Sloane? Or what comes to mind when you hear the name Braiden?

    I really wish I had named my daughter Rashida. It is such a beautiful name.

  • http://parentingbytheseatofmypants.wordpress.com greendoondoon

    I live in a majority white county. I’ve met plenty of white Chanels, Chantelles, a Shanice, and a Keisha.
    Tanisha is actually a South Indian name. I’ve seen a white Tanisha too.

  • http://parentingbytheseatofmypants.wordpress.com greendoondoon

    Tyrone is Irish. I think I know more white men named Leon than black men with the same names.

  • JaeBee

    Beyonce was named in honor of her mother’s maiden name “Beyince”–thus her cousin, Angela Beyince, who’s always travelling around with her.

    Solange is actually an old French name, which I’m sure was done as a nod to their Creole heritage.

    Condolezza’s name is actually a derivative of the Italian “con dolcezza” which means “with sweetness”.

    Seems as if no matter the reason, or the honor behind it, as long as the name is unusual and given to a black person it is automatically classified as “ghetto”.

  • olar

    whats wrong with asking the question why do black peopke name such names that is your opportunity to teach others about your culture. I find having an African name you get to explain to others the meaning behind the name and get to teach others about african culture. but i also find there is abit of hyprocracy going on here black people in America and west indians can make fun of real African names but then name their children made up names that to most people outside the culture sounds odd. i remember watching a documentary on President Obama when he first got elected and they went back to chicago i think where he first started his political career. the blacks there were saying the guy with the weird name which is fair enough but in my mine i was thinking alot of blacks in america make up names that sounds odd to many people why did barack obama stand out

  • Roses

    :)

  • http://gravatar.com/keimia Kam

    Why? Why are multiple spellings of names like Catherine, Katherine, Cathryn, Kathryn allowed, but not Erica? Just interested in hearing your reasoning.

  • sixfoota

    Wherever the origin, it’s become a popular black American name. You don’t see many white American’s named Tyrone. We’ve adapted that name. And when folks see the name Tyrone, they don’t assume it’s anyone other than a brotha. Just like Aiesha & Kenya – those aren’t originally black American names but we’ve taken them on as black American names.

    Point is, name your child what you want. Period.

  • Akosua

    We can laugh and snicker but at the end of the day black women are single handily doing what Malcolm attempted with the ‘X’. They are eradicating the slave master’s names The greatest fear to white supremacy is losing the psychological hold of the black psyche. ‘When you name a thing, you control that thing.’ A sovereign people are people who define themselves. It is no accident that black names are ridicule, seen as ghetto. White people have done a successful campaign of desecrating black names even to the point that black people mimic the same disdain for black names not approved by whites.

    I would suggest people to read up on naming rites on the Continent. Black women are culturally consistent with naming rites. Thus, in Africa, names are selected for example based on (day of birth, events, objects, esteem person). An example of this is my name AKOSUA which is Ghanian. It is my day name because I was born on Sunday. So all you females out their born on Sunday your would also be called Akosua. Names link people to their culture, race & geopolitical history. We may not appreciate it now and not see the significance but history will show its implications especially when we are deciphering cultural contributions to civilization.

    I think it is a beautiful thing. I love my Da shawns, and hybrid names. I smile.

  • Shirl

    To answer his question: Folk just give their kids names that they like… There are names with cultural significance, names that were trendy (at the time) and names that the parents just plain liked the sound of. I would think at least one of his “normal named” black friends could’ve told him that.

  • Kemba1248

    Out of curiosity, is your child’s name a “real” name or one you made up? I am asking because you mentioned that it is not native to english. What is the country of origin?

  • kemba1248

    Sorry but that is a ghetto name. I don’t care, black, white, asian, the name Ximena sounds like some sort of ointment……… It’s going to be tough for her….

  • Morgan

    Ximena is actually a popular Hispanic name. its an archaic spanish spelling of simone

  • kgo

    Also, Jesus was always a Spanish name.

  • http://gravatar.com/nolakiss16 binks

    Everything a black person does is met with a double standard or negativity because clearly what is good for the goose isn’t good for the gander. I say who cares, people have the right to name their child what they want as long as it isn’t lewd. I never got the fuss over so called “black” names because all name whether if it is new in vocabulary or old is derived from somewhere and as human/society grows/progresses so does the pool of names. And let’s not pretend having a “black” name or “normal” name is going to give black people brownie points either way in this society because regardless if your name is Trayvon, Emmitt, Malcolm, Barack, Kenya, Michelle or LaToya people still try to discriminate against you once they see you. Furthermore, I am starting to see a lot of so called “black” names crossing the color line and starting to become blurred for example I never met so many white guys named Trey it isn’t funny…lol

    So, as Shakespeare said, “what is in a name?”

  • kgo

    Wrong. Barack is Hebrew, and Obama is African, not a name made up by a black American.

  • kgo

    And Dick is short for Richard. So you don’t like nicknames? Bill O’rielly and Dick Clark probably were named William and Richard, they just got famous with their nicknames. You’re off point.

  • JS

    Right, but all those variations are based on the general syntax of the word structure based on that culture. For “K” names are more common in greek influenced languages while “C” variations are more common with latin. Of course the slight mispellings between cultures I don’t have a problem with. But if my name is “Becky” I am not going to spell it “Bakekey”. That doesn’t have roots in anything. Basically all it is doing is spelling the name out phonetically and spelling names phonetically suggests a certain level of ignorance and illiteracy to me. But to each their own.

  • http://parentingbytheseatofmypants.wordpress.com greendoondoon

    Hang on, I totally agree. My beef is with people who associate names with blackness when their origins are white. It’s the height of ignorance.

    I live in the UK and some of the names that are seriously upperclass would be thought of a “ghetto” back home.
    Names like Tarquin, Jacinta, Tamsin, Rollo.

    As long as a person’s name isn’t just offensive, why shouldn’t they be called what their parents want?

  • June

    All names are made up.

  • Orange Starr Happy Hunting

    Yep just met a white girl named Kendra.

  • Akosua

    This is consistent with white folk esp white females. They have always covenant our names.

  • http://www.lillian-mae.com Knotty Natural

    You took that a bit to personally. I think it’s pretty clear the article isn’t talking about names that are not native to English. I am a person w/ a “simple” name that was always mispronounced so there was always correction.

    So again, if you want to name your child ShakaLockaBoomBoom, at least make sure the child can pronounce, spell, and is prepared to correct (without malice) those who will mispronounce it.

  • http://gravatar.com/geenababe geenababe

    Interesting post, I understand naming your baby what every you want and spelling it however you want but can we agree that some names are just stupid. Like some mention Marijuana pepsi Jackson., I mean really you name your child after an illegal drug. Names along the lines like that I can’t get with and sometimes people don’t think of their kids. Like the women who said she had a first name with ten letters in it because her mom thought it was cool. My mom named me based off of a character in a soap opera. It’s is French but still some people mostly non-black call me another name because my name and the other name starts off the same way.

  • Tylergirl

    What animal is named Skip?????

  • Sissy

    Kendra is actually a white name originally….

    @Akosua

    That’s not true.

  • meme

    I understand that there is a double standard, however we need to understand that when white folks catch a cold, we get pneumonia. They can name their children anything that they want and it will not prevent them from taking advantage of the white privilege that is inherent in this country. When we name our children, D’Brickashaw and the like it hampers their ability to open some doors. While there are very successful people with black sounding names, the studies have shown that resumes with black sounding names do not get selected for interviews. At least give your children a chance to get to the interview. If the hiring manager is racist, it may not make a difference but just give them the chance to impress him/her before they are summarily dismissed.

  • Laura Charles

    “If the hiring manager is racist, it may not make a difference but just give them the chance to impress him/her before they are summarily dismissed.”

    Why? What is the point of that chance at impressing a racist? That is a complete waste of time and energy.

  • Akosua

    @sissy.. umm you losing me. Give me empirical not speculation. By the way I was not debating Kendra. But do your own numbers. How many white Kendras do you know? I know several Black Kendras.

  • Pip

    I think Barak is a name that was also scene in the Bible…Not saying that was the intention of the Presidents name, but my point is its not new, and its not hood either.

  • Lee Lee

    My senior year of I was so excited I was finally getting a black teacher in the communication department. Her name was LaKesha. Imagine my surprise when she turned out to be white. I will never make those types of judgement again.

  • Diane

    “- I’ve been clowning Reince Priebus’ name for years. He sounds like he should be a unicorn or some other creature in Narnia.”

    Right here is where the tears started flowing, I am so weak.

  • rhea

    Amen, amen, amen @ Akousa!

    I used to hate my name when I was growing up because I thought it was too “ghetto”, a made-up name. I wanted to go by my middle name, which sounds like a ponytail being flipped when you say it out loud. Then, I learned that my father named me after his mother, who died before I was born. Suddenly, I was proud of my name. It’s amazing how these names sound less ghetto once you learn your history. I am glad that I am not one of a thousand inconsequential Brittany’s or Ashley’s or Nicole’s, which is what middle class black folk were naming their daughters in the 80′s when I was born. I am glad that I was born to be unique. Most of all, I am glad that I was made to be a tribute to my ancestor and a testament to my father’s love for his mother. I know who I am and I know whose I am, so a paycheck is not enough of a reason to turn down my heritage.

  • Keepin it very real

    Issue is two-fold. On one hand, there is no cultural value to calling your daughter Porsche, Alize and Moet. Stop naming your kids after liquor, cars and famous Italian designers you can’t afford. Be imaginative with your baby names or be cultural but please don’t be ignorant. Dashaquanda has no meaning and we all know it. It is a way to further alienate black kids too in a way. Your name defines you. Alize? Really? Stop, just stop.

  • Keepin it very real

    Apple and Dweeziel are millionaire’s kids. There is one Barack, one Oprah and one Condoleeza but a lot of Ja’Quons or Porsches trying to get a job. Help your kids. Stop ridiculing them with ridiculous names. Take out a dictionary on real African names with actual African meanings if you want to keep it ethnic but Alize really? really?

  • Keepin it very real

    All those kids you mentioned are millionaires. Just like Jermasty (Jermaine jackson’s kid) will never be judged or apply for a real job.

  • Keepin it very real

    Last thing, a name is the most important thing you can bestow on a child. It defines that child. It is an old ritual with lots of history. Give it thought, think about who you want this kid to be and name him or her appropriately. Even if Jashaquanda becomes Senator, the point is what is the feeling that jashaquanda has about a name that seems to have no purpose? I say hte same about all the Haileys I see in the schoolyard too. Why name your kid after 20 other little girls? Just like I don’t think a girl should be named Muffy, Buffy, Missy, etc, I also think the same for these “black” names. Have respect for the woman your daughter will become and don’t name her Muffy. Come on. Dashaquanda? These are all attempts at connecting to Africa, I guess but why not African names? I think a lot of these young and impressionable parents name their kids these names because they don’t imagine the kid going further than his front door. A woman who is 40 most likely will not be naming her kid Prada and Gucci. A teen mom will though and probably mispell it. Also, Apple, Pilot Inspektor, Dweezil and all those celeb kids are millionaires. They never have to submit a resume to anyone. Does your name have effect on hiring? Yes. Not because it will trick people into thinking you are not black. No. The reality is this: in the boardroom, no one wants to address Alize and Dashaquanda or even Muffy. S exist and racist? Yes. So it is not just about getting the job, it is about sitting at the table. Every other race of people are doing it. Why do we continuously want to alienate ourselves from the table?

  • http://gravatar.com/geenababe geenababe

    LOL same with me the professor was name Yvonne

  • http://gravatar.com/yesimthatleah Yes, I’m That Leah

    My friends 17 year old daughter just named her newborn son, Tray Aunte or some ****. Tray On Tay is how it’s pronounced. I asked what she was gonna call the baby. She said she would call him Tay Tay. Tay Tay!? Great, we already have enough Tay Tay’s , Ray Ray’s, Jo Jo’s and Boo Boo’s…. I’m so disappointed, The child’s name has no meaning at all…..

    By the way, I went to High School with a girl named Vagina. Another girl in my High School was named Ho. :(

  • Christi

    I still think that some of these names are made up to try to make their child special, to give them some sort of uniqueness to help them stand out in an overpopulated society of Michael’s and Lisa’s and Susan’s and other common names. But some are hit and miss in my opinion. I have met some people with names that make you wonder if their parents even loved them at all… lol… but some are so unique that you admire the originality.
    I didn’t have a specific game plan when naming my children other than the fact that when I was pregnant, I really liked the names I chose for my children. Amber was a very pretty girly name that seemed appropriate. Journie was unique and now that she is 14, she really has lived up to her first name. Dylan was actually suddenly changed. He was supposed to be Dalen but when I held him, I called him Dylan and it just stuck.
    I was never attracted to what is being called” black names” because I never found them interesting and I wasn’t creative enough to make one up so I went with what I liked for names and hoped that my kids would come to appreciate the names I gave them. As far as race goes, it really depends on the family and their preferences. My mother was half mexican and black, and my father is black. The names they gave their 6 children are Alicia, Christi (me), Kymberly, John Jr., Robyn and Rhonda.
    Growing up black with a name like Christi has been interesting. On paper, people assume I’m white, and when they meet me they can’t get over how nice I am… lol… I don’t know the origin of my name, but it means “Christ like”, If my name gives me my identity, I hope I live up to it. :) Love

  • Apple

    Because they are the hiring manager and you need a job and job affords you the ability to eat damn it. Nobody wants to impress a racist but let’s face it they have the jobs!

  • Hannah

    I will be honest I believe a lot is in a name, we can pretend that it’s not but we all know better. All of those studies that show how children are stereotyped by the school before they’ve even met their teacher can’t all of been made up. I really can’t stand names not being spelt correctly, random accents everywhere just for the fun of it. Now before you jump down my throat there is a correct way to spell a name, yes it might be a parents’ choice, but it just makes you look stupid because you wanted to put a y where there was no need or you just wanted to throw an apostrophe in to feel special. Make up your childs name if you want be as creative as you like but please put don’t try and get creative with the alphabet and make up sounds that aren’t there.

  • KTiy

    I actually work within a youth development program, several of my teen students have miss spelled names, and this was reported by the student. Their mothers didnt know how to spell the name. I am saddened to say this but, I am against names that are “stereotypical” names. In other communities, let’s say the Jewish community, some of those names are “ethnic”, however the stigma is not as harsh as within the black community. Its one thing to be creative, but another to not know how to spell a name, yes it makes you look unintelligent.

  • Nic

    I think my biggest issues are a)people only want to police and criticize black people for giving their kids unique names, and b)once again, we have black people who want to side with the white majority to earn their ” see, I’m not like those other Negroes” badge.
    I do not have a “black” name but hey, your baby, you name it as you see fit. I remember that right before I started at my university (an Ivy), they started sending me the alumni magazine, and they actually had an article about the kids at that school who had the most unusual names.
    Guess what, they were all white, and they had names that were so odd (I won’t even type them b/c they are so unique that you could easily find them) that I still remember them all of these years later. And yeah, if I DO look them up, they have been quite successful, despite having names that were incopmlete sentences or nouns that you’d think no one would EVER use as children’s names.
    So until I hear tut-tutting about how Apple, and Coco, and Axl and Rumer won’t be able to get jobs, I really don’t care how you feel about Keyshawn or whatever.
    And seriously people, you aren’t special and the white people don’t like you more when you agree with them and help support the idea that all of the ills of the world are b/c of what black people name their kids (or whatever stereotype you are so proud NOT to guilty of when people rail in on black people).
    At the end of the day, if you are black, you are black, and I can say that all of the degree, and the right names, and everything else does not make you immune. So while there are problems to be solved, I’m not going to pat myself on the back everytime there is an article like this. Fine, so my school, and my experience, and my name pass muster, but when I get to the in person meeting, I still have a black face.
    Oh, and I also work with a lot of Chinese immigrants and the English names they choose can be pretty funny too (b/c they really have no context and just pick things they admire or like…so you’ll find some some Chinese Chanels, Rambos, and a lot of other stuff). And white people don’t question their intelligence or ability to keep a job.
    To suggest that a kid won’t be successful b/c her name is Mercedes (bad example since that is a European name, and a lot of the other names people question were not first used by black people…names are abandoned by wealthier whites when lower income people start using them) but not to quickly Apple or Coco is frankly just racist.

  • Nic

    Well, do you feel badly that Bruce Willis and Demi Moore apparently don’t know how to spell either, since their oldest daughter is named “Rumer” (pronounced “rumour”)?

  • Nic

    Very true…names go in and out of fashion. Anyone who doubts that should google the names that were most popular for boys in girls for each decade. I mean, if you are under 40, do you seriously know anyone your age named Betty or Shirley. And dial it back and tell me how many Mildreds you know?
    B/c lots of names that were once all the rage would make you seem like an oddball now.

  • Nic

    A lot of names you think are “ghetto” names actually are European, sometimes Latin in origin, so in your effort to prove that you are in fact a respectable Negro, you have really just demonstrated your ignorance.
    Mercedes and Portia (which is how Porsche is actually pronounced) actually fall into the same category.
    When I was in college, there were a fair number of African students and what I’d call “real” African-Americans (so children of immigrants from African countries) and I was surprised how many names that people dismiss as being made up or “ghetto” actually are actual African names that have meanings.
    That really shouldn’t matter, but again, some of us are so desperate to jump on the white bandwagon that we don’t do our homework.

  • Nic

    But the same is true with the bad examples given by the white people, like Mercedes (Spanish) or Portia (Italian), wihch is how the car name SHOULD be pronounced if you know any German.
    So um, yeah.
    A lot of the names being dismissed as ghetto as in fact Latin/Romance language based as well.

  • Nic

    Um, at my company I actually know a Chinese Chanel…don’t know her but have to interact with her, so yeah, it’s not just us.

  • Nic

    Jamila is another Indian name that black people use…it’s funny b/c I’ve had friends with names like that and Indian people see the names and are surprised that the person winds up being black.

  • Nic

    Actually “Portia” which is the proper pronounciation for the car (if you know German) is an Italian name and is in Shakespeare.
    So that’s not exactly low class if we want to pretend that things being European are the epitome of being respectable and real.

  • Nic

    Leon is Latin- based (so it exists in Italy, France, and Spain) and Jerome is French. What happens is that once poor people and non-white people start using names, wealthy white people abandon them.
    It’s in Freakonomics…

  • Nic

    Yvonne is French…it’s so funny how many people think that names that have existed for hundreds of years in Europe were created by black people.

  • Nic

    Um, even though a lot more Keishas might be screened out then say, Kellys, are you so naive that you think that if the hiring manager is racist that black Kelly will get the job if she makes it to the in person interview?
    Here’s the thing about racists. You can’t get around them by buying into the idea that being a respectable negro will protect you.
    It doesn’t. So that person will either cut you for having a black name or not hire you for having a black face and black skin.
    Take your pick.
    You cannot convince a racist that you are a good and smart Negro who can do the job just b/c your parents didn’t give you a “black” sounding name. You are living in denial if you think behaving properly or having the right name actually protects you.
    Sorry, you could walk on water, a racist will not care.

  • Nic

    I think another issue is that you should do your homework before dismissing a name as having no value.
    Porsche is a German last name but it is pronounced like “Portia” which is an Italian name that I’m sure you wouldn’t dismiss (it’s even in Shakespeare. Since most Americans are pretty ignorant of foreign languages, they get this wrong all of the time.
    So i think a lot of people display a lot of ignorance when they fail to learn the history of some of these names. Sure, maybe the parents never read Shakespeare but don’t say there is no value whether the name came from the Bard himself or from a child’s parents.

  • Megs

    It is not about a name making you less black. It cannot. It is about a name giving you dignity. The African ancestors thought long and hard to give a name to a new born which is why a lot of traditionally African names are very earthy and full of hope and wishes for prosperity. What dignity is there in naming a kid after a malt liquor? Or what dignity is there i naming a kid LaShatafiqua when it means absolutely nothing? or Vagina (yes there is someone named that)

  • face the facts

    We shouldn’t be so concerned abou tthe Chinese immigrants. Their kids are at Stanford and Harvard in droves, weird names or not. Our kids are failing and the names don’t help.

  • Megs

    It is not about a name making you less black. It cannot. It is about a name giving you dignity. The African ancestors thought long and hard to give a name to a new born which is why a lot of traditionally African names are very earthy and full of hope and wishes for prosperity. What dignity is there in naming a kid after a malt liquor? Or what dignity is there i naming a kid LaShatafiqua when it means absolutely nothing? or Vagina (yes there is someone named that)

  • Megs

    They named Rumer after a well known poet named “Rumer”. cough cough. Also, the Willis’ kids are filthy rich. They are not being assessed in the same way as Daquonda in the projects and you know it.

  • Megs

    Girl, I speak 3 languages and I can assure you that Posches in the hood are being named after a car the mother will never be able to afford but knows is a luxury item. So there is value in this German name that some teen mom in the projects decided to give her child? So you are ok with the value of the name being German not the value of it being about a car? WHAT? Come again?

  • Megs

    WRONG! That is why we are behind and failing partly. We believe nothing we do can change our status. Like someone said before, if a racist won’t give you a job they just won’t but no one at a Fortune 500 company wants to address Lashaquanita or La Gucci at a board meeting when the Stanford educated 4.0 Asian kids are all changing their names to Lisa. Are they changing their race? No. However, they know power comes from sitting in that board room. Truth. We think power is in keeping our “black” 10 syllable black name. Once again, we picked the wrong battles.

  • Megs

    That is why we are behind and failing partly. We believe nothing we do can change our status. Like someone said before, if a racist won’t give you a job they just won’t but no one at a Fortune 500 company wants to address Lashaquanita or La Gucci at a board meeting when the Stanford educated 4.0 Asian kids are all changing their names to Lisa. Are they changing their race? No. However, they know power comes from sitting in that board room cause it leads to financial power. Truth. We think power is in keeping our “black” 10 syllable black name. Once again, we picked the wrong battles. Meanwhile Zhang Chiao is changing his or her name to Lisa and learning long form division by the age of 4. We need to check ourselves.

  • Megs

    My sister is at Stanford. The majority of the students there are Asian. MANY have changed their names to generic American names. They know power is not so much in holding on to the ethnicity of your name but rather in getting that 4.0 at Stanford and becoming successful. Names help. Until we realize the subtleties of the choices we make, Dashafaniqua will still be in the projects serving you happy meals at McDonald’s cause it is beyond her name. The name is one of the symptoms. No coincidence all the 6-figure black people I know have no Dashafaniqua named kids and they are successful and running things. Running things. They are still black and proud but they knew what it took to run the show. Now, THEY are telling white people what to do. Dashafaniqua ain’t. Real talk.

  • Megs

    My sister is at Stanford. The majority of the students there are Asian. MANY have changed their names to generic American names. They know power is not so much in holding on to the ethnicity of your name but rather in getting that 4.0 at Stanford and becoming successful. Names help. Until we realize the subtleties of the choices we make, Dashafaniqua will still be in the projects serving you happy meals at McDonald’s cause it is beyond her name. The name is one of the symptoms. No coincidence all the 6-figure black people I know have no Dashafaniqua named kids and they are successful and running things. Running things. They are still black and proud but they knew what it took to run the show. Now, THEY are telling white people what to do. Dashafaniqua ain’t. Real talk.

  • Megs

    Let’s do a survey. How many Shaniquas are Ivy League educated, CEOs or college educated as opposed to the black Debrahs, Diannes and Michelles? The reality is you will find black names like Shaniqua are disproportionately represented in a lower class while Michelle or Dianne is not. So there is a link. We just don’t want to admit it.

  • Rochelle

    So what it took to run the show is being named “Tom”? LOL. Comedy..

  • Rochelle

    What is the value of Porche? Well what is the value of Megan or Nicole? I am almost certain those are Irish names. So what is the difference in naming a BLACK child a name that is not African? They are all names from other cultures. So, I don’t see your point. So name your child an Irish or English name but not German and not one associated with an automobile? Who makes these rules? You? The white man you are begging for a job? The issue is not names. It is discrimination. Point blank. So you sitting here gunning for all black people to name their child Rebecca is pointless. How about gunning to economic growth through business and home ownership. I think that would be more fruitful of a discussion. Should all Nigerians change their names? I have a few Nigerian friends with long names. Beautiful names. They are educated and doing well for themselves. So a name didn’t stop them. If you don’t see that a black man named Peter or Brian is still a BLACK man when he shows up for the interview…..YOU are the one that is lost.

  • Rochelle

    @ Megs

    Power is setting up our own table…..like your beloved Asians do.

  • Megs

    Nope. All of it is connected. Why are there no Dashafanidaquitas who are CEOs of Goldman Sachs and why are all the Dashafaniquadanidas serving you happy meals? Think aobut it.

  • SueQ

    We live in America and we have to know how to play the game and play it right. It is a FACT with multiple studies that Quaneshia and Melquaun have a slim to none chance of getting to that interview. Many black adults have altered their ‘black’ names to common ones and have seen an increase in job call backs. Lets not be ignorant here.
    Growing up with the name Susan as a black young woman, has proven the research as well. I love my name and plan to name my children ambiguous names to give them a chance in this society.

  • SueQ

    We live in America and we have to know how to play the game and play it right. It is a FACT with multiple studies that Quaneshia and Melquaun have a slim to none chance of getting to that interview. Many black adults have altered their ‘black’ names to common ones and have seen an increase in job call backs. Lets not be ignorant here.
    Growing up with the name Susan as a black young woman, has proven the research as well. I love my name and plan to name my children ambiguous names to give them a chance in this society.

  • Nic

    I’m going to say you didn’t go to Stanford and don’t have any interaction with executives in Fortune 500 companies.
    B/c if Tanikka goes to Stanford, she can get the job.
    Too many black people believe that facile and superficial changes like names and hair will get them jobs when in fact that reason we are falling behind is b/c not enough of us do well enough in school, or even go to good schools to begin with.
    And if you start the race 10 steps behind, then by the time you finish high school, you aren’t even running the same race anymore
    As someone who actually did go to an Ivy League school, the kids with black names who have the degrees behind it have no in fact suffered and many have moved up the ladder quite nicely, with natural hair, and with black names.
    But yeah sweetheart, if you do’nt know Chemistry or Calculus or Computer Science or a foreign language, that isn’t b/c your mom named you Moet or Prada.

  • Nic

    Actually boo, 20% of the kids at Stanford are Asian. That is not a majority. Which is probably why you aren’t there with her. If she doesn’t know that 20% isn’t a majority then good luck to her graduating too.
    And Asians are a good example of how playing the game doesn’t get you that far ahead. They can change their names and agree with white people as much as they want. They do NOT do well in coproroate America or in law firms b/c they are seen as worker bees and not leaders.
    And many Asians actually aren’t high achievers. The model minority myth is a myth for a reason.

  • Apple

    Jews change their names too, sometimes they go for the whole name first and last name

  • Breezy

    If Thomas and Dayquan both have a 3.5 GPA from Harvard and they’re both applying to be a Junior Consultant at the Boston Consulting Group, who do you think will be more likely to get the interview (unless they’re diversity hunting) ?

  • Rochelle

    What is the value of the name Porche, Rayquanna, Lakeytria? Well what is the value of Megan or Nicole? I am almost certain those are Irish names. So what is the difference in naming a BLACK child a name that is not African? They are all names from other cultures……meaning cultures that are not our own. So, I don’t see your point. So name your child an Irish or English name but not a German name or not one associated with an automobile? Who makes these rules? You? The white man you are begging for a job? The issue is not names. It is discrimination. Point blank. So you sitting here gunning for all black people to name their child Rebecca is pointless. How about gunning to economic growth through business and home ownership. I think that would be more fruitful of a discussion. Should all Nigerians change their names? I have a few Nigerian friends with long names. Beautiful names. They are educated and doing well for themselves. So a name didn’t stop them. If you don’t see that a black man named Peter or Brian is still a BLACK man when he shows up for the interview…..YOU are the one that is lost. Plus I know plenty of Peters, Pauls, Mikes, Terrys Elizabeths, and Stephanies that are toll booth collectors, working fast food, retail, home help aides, and the like. Meaning they still ain’t ish. Most of the people naming their children these creative names are of the lower class. It is hard to move from one class to another in this country. So not only do we have a racism problem, we have a classism problem. The only way to solve that is to build our own….economically, social, and monetarily. If that doesn’t happen we go no where. Whether we are named Dayquan or David.

  • Megs

    Rochelle, you make some great points but you know for sure what I am saying is painfully true. We have to put names in social context. Nicole may have meant car or ironing board in the 16th century as all names have some weird origin, ok I give you that. However, in this society and this day and age, Nicole has a different social context than Dashaniqua and you know it. At the end of the day, are all names silly? Probably. However in a social context when you are competing with all the Asian Suzies (whose names were originally Chinese) the name means something. It is all part of the game. We can play the game in a different way and say that a 24 year old Black grad from Stanford does not need the validation of getting that great Goldman Sachs job or we can say, why not allow this black grad to have access to the same opportunities that Asian Suzy has given herself. It is up to us. Socially, we find Dashaniquas are in a different social class and different social experience than the black Michelles. Does that suck? Yes. Is it a harsh reality? Yes. The black teen mom who named her kids after cars and liquor probably does not have the ability to expose this child to the outside world nor help that child compete in the world. Are there some that get out? Yes, some. The name is another symptom of us alienating black kids through names, lack of exposure, language etc. Black parents can continue to name their kids Shaniqua and Lamberghini if they want, but meanwhile Asian kids are graduating from high school and college at rates doubling that of black kids. While we black parents are fighting for the right to name our kids Shaniquah, the Asian parents are demanding that their kids get A’s in Trigonometry and yes if it means losing their Chinese name and calling themselves Suzie then they do it because the reward of playing the game for them is greater than winning some fight about a name that has no ethnic value anyway. Pray tell what exactly does Dashafaniqua mean in any language? Yes, that is someone’s name btw.

  • Rochelle

    Asians graduating at the top of their class and black children lagging behind, have nothing to do with names and I really hope you could but your logic to work and see that. Also Shaniqua does mean something and is not “made up.” If you want to teach your children to beg white men for jobs, fine. Ill teach mine to be self sufficient. To take over my business when they come of age. Yeah Asians get good grades, but they also open up businesses and invest their money after they get those degrees. Again I know plenty of black people with “white” names and they are still in the hood and still ain’t ish. You probably have some in your own family. Your agreement is null and void.

  • Rochelle

    I would hate to have to go through the pain of labor, look into my child’s face to pick an appropriate name and have to think about what a racist white man may think of my choice. “Should I pick an African name? No white man won’t like that!” That is the shame.

  • Chrissy

    Oh gosh. Here we go with the holier than thou Africans.

  • Joyous

    If Dayquan was a real righteous man, he would forget about being another worker bee for White-owned Boston Consulting Group, and establish his own business. A 3.5 GPA from Harvard mans you start something of your own. If anything, his name woul be a huge benefit, because it would stand out when seeking clients. It is a name to remember, while Thomas is as boring as watching White paint dry on a White wall. When will the majority of Black American men and women wake up, and understand that the only solution to the high unemployment situtaton is through business ownership. I would much rather spend my life bulding a business to give others oppotunties, and pass on a foundation for my family than spend my life begging Caucasions for jobs, or working for them.

  • Rochelle

    This a million times! Tell that to Megs. Her head is in the clouds for real!

  • Meg

    Rochelle: I know plenty of Black MBAs who got their start slaving away at Associate jobs at Fortune 500 companies only to use the connections they made there to open their businesses. Some people (like myself) have worked up the ladder within very white industries and made it our own. I don’t have children but I was able to use the money the WHITE company helped me get to put my brother’s kids in a very nice private elementary school. That WHITE check was worth every penny, thank you very much. I don’t think you understood a word I said and you are letting your emotions get in the way. I am saying we have symptoms of this alienation we fully accept as rule. Other people who have less connection to America and who hardly speak the language have understood that getting your kid through Harvard so they can then turn oaround and use those Harvard connections to further their community IS revolutionary. There are two ways to revolt. As the world is getting smaller and smaller, we need to find ways to be part of it not outside of it. Naming your kid after malt liquors is a symtom of a greater problem of us just giving up on our kids and giving up on our standards. I said in a post before that naming your kid an African name with REAL African origin is a very different thing then naming your kid after a malt liquor or Dashafaniqua. Those names mean nothing. In fact they are an insult to Africans. People in my family: actually we have been middle class to upper middle class for many generations but I won’t bore you with the details. You automatically assumed because I am black, I come from the hood. Ok, girl. Do your thing. I will stick to what I said: naming your kid after liquor, cars and Italian designers is a symptom of our misplaced priorities. Face the facts.

  • Rahim

    took the words right out of my mouth!!

  • donnadara

    I have an African name as does the President of the United States. Condoleeza, made up. I think the author’s examples say it all.

  • donnadara

    If people are racist, once they see your black face, they will not give you a chance anyway. There is a limit to assimilation. People are prejudiced not because of the name, but because of the black. If they could identify Susie and John as black, they would treat them the same way.

  • Rochelle

    @ megs. You like to beg whites for jobs and then brag about it. That is cool. You also like to pay crazy amounts of money for white people to teach your kids about “white Jesus.” (I know they have a pic of white Jesus on the wall, lol!) Also your business. I see we are of two different mindsets. I don’t live my life to worship the white man and make him comfortable. You think very small. Stay in your small world.

  • Charles Heifet

    For a long time, many whites have been giving their kids trendy, faux aristocratic, and bizarre names. Sarah Palin is one of the worst. She named her first child “Track.” By doing that she proved herself shallow, trashy, and weird. Let’s not forget about Dylan, Flynn, Cody, Madison, Colby, Walker, etc.. These are goofy names that refect on the goofiness and shallowness of the parents.

  • Apple

    Difference is with your black name you won’t even get a chance (interview) your résumé will just be tossed but whatever

  • Anon

    I had a classmate in college named Chanel. She was white, but she said that she’d been told on multiple occasions, by people of many races, that they thought she was black before they met her, when they read/heard her name.

  • http://chrishubley.com chrisblazingsun

    I have a (white) friend called China Bluefish from birth. Unsuprisingly she is now a peformance artist.

  • Megs

    Rochelle: there you go shaming black people who did all the right things – got into Ivy League schools, made connections, made their way through corporate America and made something of themselves to turn around and help their communities. You know nothing about me. I laugh at black people such as yourself who demand that all black people give up everything right now and go start your own business because working for the “white man” is a betrayal. lol. That small business you have, do tell, where did you get the loan for it? A WHITE banking institution lent you the money. I can go on and on with examples of how even your black owned business depends on white people in some way but it would make you cry. I am proud of the double degrees I worked super hard for and the titles that I got at a major corporation (I was the first black woman in my general filed to have gotten as far as I did). You find that shameful but I find it revolutionary. You simple child. In your thinking, I suppose Barack Obama should be ashamed of being the President of the United States right? Oprah should be ashamed of being CEO of OWN? I mean her deal is not with a black corporation but a white one but that is shameful right? Silly child. My head is not in the clouds. I had an agenda when I was a teenager (to become very successful by the age of 35). I did it. Try the shame game with someone else who would actually bite. Silly person you.

  • Megs

    A 3.5 GPA from Harvard means you think for yourself and you decide to get your rewards as you see fit not as a poster on a blog tells you that you should. My sister is a 4.0 at Stanford. Every major firm is looking for her to join them. She will do with that as she pleases. She knows making 6 figures before you are 28 has HUGE benefits. She won’t let naysayers who could not get that 4.0 at Stanford make her feel as if she is not worthy. Same people who tell black kids who study and get good grades that they are “acting white”. Shame on all of you for your simple thoughts.

  • Megs

    To Rochelle @ 2:19pm: First of, I am Agnostic so that shuts down your “Jesus” comment. Once again, you ASSUME and you know what that does rigt? Secondly, see my post which answers you silliness:Rochelle: there you go shaming black people who did all the right things – got into Ivy League schools, made connections, made their way through corporate America and made something of themselves to turn around and help their communities. You know nothing about me. I laugh at black people such as yourself who demand that all black people give up everything right now and go start your own business because working for the “white man” is a betrayal. lol. That small business you have, do tell, where did you get the loan for it? A WHITE banking institution lent you the money. I can go on and on with examples of how even your black owned business depends on white people in some way but it would make you cry. I am proud of the double degrees I worked super hard for and the titles that I got at a major corporation (I was the first black woman in my general filed to have gotten as far as I did). You find that shameful but I find it revolutionary. You simple child. In your thinking, I suppose Barack Obama should be ashamed of being the President of the United States right? Oprah should be ashamed of being CEO of OWN? I mean her deal is not with a black corporation but a white one but that is shameful right? Silly child. My head is not in the clouds. I had an agenda when I was a teenager (to become very successful by the age of 35). I did it. Try the shame game with someone else who would actually bite. Silly person you.

  • Rochelle

    So……….we should shame and judge others that want to be creative with the names they give their children, but you yourself don’t like to be judged? Gotcha. I guess you don’t like the shoe on the other foot, huh? Please shut up, no one asked for your life story. No need to give it. I never said black people should be shamed to work for or with whites. Get in where you fit in. It is fine as long as you don’t mess with my money, I couldn’t care less. What I did say is that blacks, as well as any other minority group should name their children according to their culture or likes without people like your dumb self “shaming” them and making “judgements” (2 things you don’t like remember)? BTW, never got a loan for any business I used my own funds. Guess you shouldn’t ASSume huh?

  • Megs

    Rochelle @ 1:07am: blah blah blah. Back pedal on that bike hun? Pray and do tell, what is culturally black about naming your kid after malt liquors and champagne? You missed the part where I stated calling your kid an actual African name with actual African meaning is ok but for heaven’s sake what does Alize and Dashafaniqua exactly mean? In any language? Imaginative? Try underexposed. Of course that is ok with folks like. As long as it is someone else’s kid. The point is the name you give your child expresses the level of value you give your child. You name him or her after liquor and it hints to how you feel about the kid’s value. You obviously have no problem with this because, once again, it isn’t your problem, It’s those poor black people’s problem. You hypocrite. Oh, you used your own funds for your business. Bravo to the one black person in America who in no way at all depends on any “white” money for her survival. Bravo! You are one in a million. You drive a car? You are online? You have a FB account? White people. Now you can sweat that or actually use their resources to turn around and own the game. You are stuck on simple things. Good luck to you.

  • https://plus.google.com/102426889694490248529 Erickka Sy Savané

    I named my daughter the Zimbabwean name Makhosazana (meaning Princess) because I loved it. I like to think that it will make her stand strong. Anyone who has a problem with it can eat rocks!

  • http://gravatar.com/designdiva40 paintgurl40

    I have a “regular” name but I still love it. It’s feminine but not too girly. I’ve heard some people tell me because of my name that at first they thought I would be stuck up and are surprised that I am more “hood” than snobbish. My mother told me that she wanted my sisters and I to have girl names and not her name. She was born in 1930 and back then no matter the gender, people named you after your father. I had aunts and cousins with male names. I don’t have a problem with black sounding names.

    This is what pisses me off. My married last name is the same as a popular black judge on t.v and an older black singer. White people will pronounce or say every other last name but that simple last name. But they expect me to show respect for their last names like Kawalsky or Blajovech or whatever. I think black names are cool for the most part but the ones I scratch my head over are the ones like “Passion” or something that sounds like it belongs to a stripper. If the parents like to smoke weed don’t name the kid Marijuana, at least be slick about it and name her Mary Jane.

  • ScriptTease

    Cashmone’, come in side girl, it’s getting late. Yes, that is an actual name given to a child. SMDH.

  • ScriptTease

    Genuine African names is one thing, thrown together names is another. Condoleeza was named Condomleeka, then she may have a different story to tell. Most people, including whites know the difference between an African name and a straight-up hoodrat, ghetto fabulous name. I’m sorry, but it is what it is.

  • ScriptTease

    Not necessarily because some of those Quaneshia also have the stereotypical attitude to match. Black folks know this, and white folks do too. I guarantee a Black owned business would bypass a Quaneshia any day for a Cynthia. Tell me I’m lying.

  • ScriptTease

    I remember 20/20 conducted a study about Ghetto sounding names, brought to their attention by one of their Black employees. A White lady who was over hiring had her appearance hidden, but she stated the higher ups would have them to toss out all the Ghetto/hoodrat names. So whether people want to admit or not, if you’re shooting for the stars, your atrocious name can hinder you.

  • dave

    I don’t know about everyone else but as a white guy, I’ve always found our ‘normal’ names to be boring as hell. Frank. David. Henry. Wtf. Barkevious: thats Greek Epic poem quality there. And yeah, Rand? Mitt? Really? Mitt?

  • ScriptTease

    Yeah Dave, I’d rather have a boring name than a cringe worthy name. I thank God my parents hooked my brother and me up with some terrific names.

  • devi

    Lol, I know a white girl named Shonda and another named LaJuana

  • Stop the trolling

    You are not white so stop lying.

  • http://gravatar.com/lrblevins29 lrblevins29

    @megs I just want to enlighten you on something. Europeans in this country will be a minority. Europeans make up less than 10% of the world’s population. When will my people wake up and realize white folk really have no power of us. Someone black will be in these positions one day. Until then name your child what the h*ll you please and if someone doesn’t like it too bad. Start your own business so you don’t have to depend on people who clearly are jealous of us and don’t like us.

  • Marchelle

    My name’s Marchelle. I’ve heard of or seen on Jerry Springer show a few other Marchelle’s. All black, except maybe one or two. My siblings names?? Mark, Lisa, Lori. FYI…I’m white.

  • Keita

    My name, Keita, is Swahili. I was born (and named) during the black pride/ black power movement of the 70′s, and my name reflects my parent’s wish to give me a name thatdid not originate in white culture.Why? To give me a sense of my African heritage. To be unique. And…because it was their right as my parents. I have carried on this tradition- my kids are named Imani, Zion, Fatima and Sarena. Why? To give them a sense of their African heritage. To be unique. And…because it is my right as a parent.

  • George

    It is too bad that the common parents don’t think about the ramifications of the name they give their children. The first thing an employer sees is the name. It means a lot. Ghetto names are readily picked out and their resumes are immediately shredded (trouble makers). Christian names are put on the top of the pile (passivist who will follow orders and not make trouble). The best names are neutral ones that do not raise suspicion.

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