It doesn’t happen often, but when a doctor botches a child’s circumcision, it’s heart-breaking.

Maggie Rhodes is dealing with that heartbreak right now, after a catastrophic mistake on the operating table.

Removal of the foreskin from a child’s penis is rooted in concerns about health, hygiene and religion. But some question the necessity of the procedure.

Rhodes is sorry she ever took her young son to get circumcised.

“After I went home and I discovered that my son’s penis was not there, I immediately froze, like, oh my God,” Rhodes recalls.

The mother said she couldn’t believe what happened when she took her three-month-old son Ashton to Christ Community Health Center on Broad Avenue for a circumcision in August. She says doctors told her the procedure would take about 20 minutes.

But after a couple hours, Ashton was still in surgery.

“It took them about three hours to do the circumcision and so my baby screamed the whole three hours, like the whole process,” Rhodes said. “Then even when she gave him back to us, he was still screaming.”

Rhodes said the doctor performing the surgery obviously botched the procedure. But when it was over, she says they simply returned her screaming son to her, never telling her about the devastating mistake that had happened in the operating room.

“I should have been notified that something went wrong in this room with your baby,” she said. “I wasn’t notified.  They gave me back my baby like nothing was wrong. They said, ‘here go your son.’ Yeah, something went wrong in that room.”

It’s something Rhodes said she didn’t find out about until she went home with a still screaming son, and a diaper filled with blood.

She said her curious sister finally discovered Ashton’s mutilated penis.

“When my sister pulled the cloth back, it was covered in blood and it was no penis there,” Rhodes said.

All that was left was a partial penis and his tiny testicles. Rhodes said Ashton urinates through a hole in his penis. She says she can’t imagine what she’ll say to her son, when he’s old enough to understand what happened to him.

“Like, ‘Momma like, how could this happen to me? How could this happen to me?,'” she said. “How could you explain that to your child that you don’t have a penis that they have to reconstruct one or you probably have might not never be able to have kids? That don’t sit well with me at all.”

Rhodes has hired an attorney and is pursuing a medical malpractice suit against Christ Community Health Centers.

As for little Ashton, a reconstructive surgery planned for October has been rescheduled for early next year.

FOX13 News contacted Christ Community Health Centers for a comment. We’re told the CEO is aware of our request, but so far has not returned our repeated calls.

 

Source FOX13 NEWS Reprint: http://www.myfoxmemphis.com/story/23912521/mother-upset-over-botched-circumcision#ixzz2kX9JIfPW

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  • This happened with an ob/gyn who once practiced (note the past tense) at my job. It happened at a different facility and the family sued her and the hospital. they ended up getting a few million, but not enough if you ask me, especially since little of it was for punitive damages. They were directed to put the bulk the money in a trust for the boy’s mental health care, so obviously there wasn’t much that could be done in the way of reconstruction. The doctor that did it just peaced out after the procedure, and a merciful mother-baby RN hunted down the discarded tissue and tried to contact the doctor to no avail, after noticing profuse bleeding upon the boy’s return to the nursery. By the time the doctor DID turn up, the tissue was no good.

    From working with this particular doctor in the aftermath, I could see for myself that she’s nuttier than squirrel cheeks. There really needs to be a better way for patients to vet providers before submitting to their care. I saw numerous unrelated complaints about this person AFTER this incident went public locally, but none before. some could have been false and driven by malice, but I’d like to think that at least half were legit grievances that women felt the courage to come forward with after knowing she’s harmed others.

    • I wanted to add that the need for provider vetting is ESPECIALLY important for poor patients, who are likely to be reliant on free or low income clinics, or a pool of providers approved by their state funded coverage. I’ve been in both situations and I was mostly lucky in just playing “eeny meenie minie moe”, because the process of of making a choice out of limited options is daunting with no frame of reference.

      Choosing a provider is just as daunting when you have good insurance, but it’s much easier for the rare person who can afford to pay for their care out of pocket and basically give a provider their ass to kiss by taking their money elsewhere if they aren’t happy with their services.

  • Very sad news, but cases like this aren’t as rare as you’d think. If you have a strong stomach, then google the botched jobs, and imagine how many other botches are out there without pictures on the internet.

    The record payout for a botched circumcision is $22.8 million. It was said at the time that the victim “will never be able to function sexually as a normal male and will require extensive reconstructive surgery and psychological counseling as well as lifelong urological care and treatment by infectious disease specialists.” Sure, cases like that are very rare, but why should they happen at all?

    Why are people still having irreversible genital surgery performed on baby boys? It’s not like it can’t wait. The USA (at 55% and dropping) and Israel are the only two countries in the world where more than half of baby boys are circumcised. Other countries circumcise, but not till anywhere from the age of seven to adolescence.

  • Kattified

    I don’t have any children, but I know I’m not circumcising any son that I have. I have never read or heard a valid reason to do so. I actually had a friend who was embarrassed by not being circumcised as if he would be seen different. If it’s naturally that way why change it?