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As the holidays approach, families are either upholding old traditions or creating new ones.

In this month’s Ladies Home Journal, First Lady Michelle Obama reveals the holiday activities that take place at the White House and how she celebrated the holidays as a kid.

“Christmas has always been a special time in my household,” Michelle Obama says in the December/January issue. “Growing up, we lived in a little-bitty apartment, but my mom put her heart and soul into decorating that house.”

With two daughters of their own, the First Family have made their own holiday traditions that liven up the White House.

“I’ve hula-hooped, done a dog trick with (pet pooch) Bo and read poems,” she said. “The kids will sing or put on plays. The President and some of the other dads will get together and do a song.”

Another tradition that endures is holiday cooking.

“Sasha is our big cookie maker,” her mom says. “It’s one of the major activities the girls do when they have friends over.”

 

Clutchettes, what are some holiday traditions your family enjoys?

 

 

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  • Nikki and The City

    Our grab bag is always a hit :)

  • My Name is My Name

    There are none.

  • Chika

    We watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade and then we watch the Detroit Lions lose yet again.

  • MimiLuvs

    Depends of the side (maternal and paternal) of my family that I am spending the holidays with.
    For my maternal side, it’s celebrated in the typical dysfunctional family fashion: getting drunk off of egg nog/alcoholic beverage/mouth wash/etc., spend hours reminscing about their abusive childhood, passive-aggressiveness, eating copious amounts of food, napping, watching old basketball games, listening to my uncles talk about their failed basketball dreams, scavenging the turkey/ham carcass for left-overs (after the guests took almost everything) and wishing to never experience this stuff again.

    For my paternal side of the family, it is less dysfunctional, but it is boring (especially for a kid):
    Midnight Mass service on Christmas Eve, church service on Christmas Day, breakfast at the grands’ house, doing last minute shopping, have lunch, go back to the grands’ for dinner, watch the adults play Bid Whist for pennies, watch a game (it could be a game of anything: hockey, basketball, football, shot putting, curling, etc,.), watch them drink, then there’s gift exchanging, drinking some more, watching “Babes in Toyland”, more card games and then it is time to go home.