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According to a new study,  published in the journal Crime & Delinquency on Monday, 50 percent of all black males and approximately 40 percent of all white males in the United States are arrested by their 23rd birthday.  The study analyzed data from 1997 to 2008 of teenagers and young adults and their arrest histories.  The arrests ranged from simple truancy and underage drinking to serious and violent crimes.

The study also noted that the arrest rate among white females and black females was slightly different.  At age 18, while the arrest rate was 12 percent for white females, it was 11.9 percent and 11.8 percent for black and Hispanic females, respectively. By age 23, arrest rates were 20 percent for white females and 18 percent and 16 percent for Hispanic and black females, respectively.

Robert Brame, the study’s lead author and professor of Criminology at the University of South Carolina, provided background on the arrest rates and outcomes of being arrested.

“A problem is that many males – especially black males – are navigating the transition from youth to adulthood with the baggage and difficulties from contact with the criminal justice system,” Brame said. “Criminal records that show up in searches can impede employment, reduce access to housing, thwart admission to and financing for higher education and affect civic and volunteer activities such as voting or adoption. They also can damage personal and family relationships.”

The researchers hope to develop more of an understanding in the influencing factors that can lead to crimes and arrests, and examine the roles gender and race play in them.

“A problem is that many males – especially black males – are navigating the transition from youth to adulthood with the baggage and difficulties from contact with the criminal justice system,” Robert Brame, the study’s lead author and a professor of Criminology at the University of South Carolina, said. “Criminal records that show up in searches can impede employment, reduce access to housing, thwart admission to and financing for higher education and affect civic and volunteer activities such as voting or adoption. They also can damage personal and family relationships.”

 

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  • E

    This can’t be right…

  • Anthony

    All arrests are not equal. Arrests for driving issues, disorderly conduct, failure to pay tickets, etc. are not the same as felony arrests. A good portion of arrests that white boys suffer are for things that will blow over without too much fuss. Black boys probably have a higher proportion of felony arrests, and even the misdemeanor violations will be blown up much worse than for them than for their white counterparts.

    • joe

      The problem is that there is no such thing as a minor arrest for a black boy. A misdemeanor is viewed as a predictor of future felony activity.

    • Anthony

      Indeed.