In  the age of technology and selfie-indulgence, people tend to forget that there’s a population of people who don’t have access to such extravagances.  At Salon, an amazing essay was written by D. Watkins, an adjunct professor from Baltimore, called “Too Poor for Pop Culture“:

Miss Sheryl, Dontay, Bucket-Head and I compiled our loose change for a fifth of vodka. I’m the only driver, so I went to get it. On the way back I laughed at the local radio stations going on and on and on, still buzzing about Obama taking a selfie at Nelson Mandela’s funeral. Who cares?

[…] Two taps on the door, it opened and the gang was all there — four disenfranchised African-Americans posted up in a 9 x 11 prison-size tenement, one of those spots where you enter the front door, take a half-step and land in the yard. I call us disenfranchised, because Obama’s selfie with some random lady or the whole selfie movement in general is more important than us and the conditions where we dwell.

Watkins then describes with intimate details his friends that are about to start their night of spades and vodka:

COPY CODE SNIPPET

It’s amazing how the news seems so instant to most from my generation with our iPhones, Wi-Fi, tablets and iPads, but actually it isn’t. The idea of information being class-based as well became evident to me when I watched my friends talk about a weeks-old story as if it happened yesterday.

Miss Sheryl doesn’t have a computer and definitely wouldn’t know what a selfie is. Her cell runs on minutes and doesn’t have a camera. Like many of us, she’s too poor to participate in pop culture. She’s on public assistance living in public housing and scrambles for odd jobs to survive.

Sheryl lost her job as a cook moments after she lost her daughter to heroin, her son Meaty to crack and her kidneys to soul food. It took 15 to 20 unanswered applications a week for over a year for her to realize that no company wants to employ a woman on dialysis. Sometimes Bucket-Head and I chip in and buy groceries for her and her grandson Lil Kevin who has severe lead-paint poisoning, but was diagnosed late and is too old to receive a check.

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  • This writer has basically eviscerated the MSM. He shows how the privileged players discuss their issues and concerns while excluding a majority segment of the US population. This isn’t “relative poverty” either. This is poor. No door poor. I hope he is eligible for and wins the Pulitzer. What is a selfie indeed.

  • Starla

    Reading Miss Sheryl’s biography had me feeling depressed. How can one person’s life be so filled of sorrowful experiences, and on top of all of that deep poverty?

    I am grateful for this article because while I have disconnected from social media by choice, I completely forgot that there are people who have no choice in the matter.

  • Excellent article! A nice, healthy dose of reality!

  • Tish

    .I can’t get over such desperate impoverishment that people steal and sell doors. Doors? Seriously?