rapist

Three Elmwood Park, New Jersey men and a 17-year-old are facing charges that they sexually assaulted a severely intoxicated girl and showed a video of the assault to others, according to prosecutors.

Prosecutors charged 18-year-olds Craig Howe, Justin Draper and Ashari Wilson, as well as an unnamed 17-year-old male Thursday after a 15-year-old girl learned that she had been sexually assaulted by at least three of the suspects at a backyard gathering on June 21, Bergen County Prosecutor John L. Molinelli said in a news release Monday.

According to the prosecutor, the girl was found unconscious by her parents on the front lawn of their home on June 21. After undergoing testing, her blood alcohol level was 0.27, more than three times the legal limit for adults.

From NJ.Com

On July 8, the alleged victim, accompanied by her parents and a friend, told Elmwood Park police that the 17-year-old male told her they had sex at the back yard gathering, Molinelli said. The alleged victim had no recollection of the event, but the accompanying friend told detectives that she had seen a video in which the alleged victim was sexually assaulted by multiple men while heavily intoxicated, authorities said.

The alleged assault occurred at 100 Falmout Avenue, the residence of Howe and Wilson.

Prosecutors say Draper, Howe and the 17-year-old had sexually penetrated the victim while Ashari Wilson filmed the assault on his iPhone. The video was later recovered and logged into evidence, Molinelli said.

Draper and Howe were both charged with one count of aggravated sexual assault and lodged in Bergen County Jail on $150,000 bail. Wilson faces charges of manufacturing child pornography, endangering the welfare of a minor, hindering apprehension, invasion of privacy, and possession of child pornography. He was remanded to Bergen County Jail on $200,000.

The 17-year-old was also charged on a juvenile complaint with aggravated sexual assault, assault on a police officer, and resisting arrest.

#Justiceforthisyounggirl.

55 Comments

  1. noirluv45

    I have a question. Do you all think the rap/hip hop culture is to blame for the insensitivity toward women?

    Back in the 70s, we attended house parties. In fact, people would drive down the street and ask where the happenings are. People showed up, and I don’t recall there being any violence (but then again, we didn’t have 24-hour news back then or the Internet), but I’m wondering if the consciences of these young men are being seared because of the portrayal of women in music videos. I’m not saying it’s fully to blame, but I wonder if it contributes to this sick mentality. Just thinking.

    0
    • [email protected]

      Interesting question Sister.

      Today, I can’t listen to a lot of the mainstream hip hop anyone. Recently, someone blasted music talking about stuff that I can’t mention here. I currently listen to artists like Jean Grae, the Roots, Jasiri X, and underground artists.

      The 70’s were a little before my time. LOL. I was born in the 1980’s and even in the 1990’s, many conscious people were in the mainstream level showing their talent like Arrested Development. One problem is that corporate executives today fund and advance artists that show degrading music against black women and black people in general. The corporate elite could care less about our people and they seek profit obviously. I think that among some young men (not all), they get indoctrinated into believing that manhood is about how many people that you can sleep with or how many people can you beat up. That is not true manhood obviously. These negative influences (along with other things) does contribute to some males believing in sick views.

      Also, I think there are just going to be evil folks in the world regardless of the generation that we live. There are going to be sick people and they must be held accountable for their actions. Real hip hop doesn’t contribute to it, but a nihilistic version of hip hop does contribute to a lot of the unfair insensitivity toward women. That is true. Too many artists refuse to be held accountable for their lyrics since their words sometimes have more influence than political or religious leaders.

      Also, it won’t hurt for us to fight back against misogynistic messages and unjust violence messages found in the mainstream music industry too.

      0
    • noirluv45

      Thank you, truth! You hit the head on the nail when you mentioned corporations and rap. That’s huge because I remember the days of conscious rap, and then it took a turn for the worst. Enter gangsta rap.

      Unfortunately, evil people will continue to walk the earth until the earth is no more; however, like you stated, they need to be reap what they’ve sown, and we must stand up against it. I remember C. Delores Tucker trying to do just that, and they disrespected that woman to no end. It was pitiful and plain pathetic!

      0
    • [email protected]

      Back then, a lot of people would have block parties and have a great time listening to music. Now, there is no much selfish individualism that we are certainly reminded that we have a long way to go.

      Many folks, as they get older, see the gangster rap situation as counterrevolutionary. Its proponents say that these artists are just discussing the reality of the streets. Yet, authors spanning centuries described the vicious conditions of poor communities. Yet, many of these authors never degraded women, they never degraded humanity in an obscene way, and they did not have to use one penny to advance material excess instead of social enlightenment. I heard of C. Delores Tucker. She experienced massive disrespect, which was unjust and evil.

      0
    • [email protected]

      You’re Welcome Sister. Goodnight Sister noirluv45.

      0
    • [email protected]

      Also, a Brother named Solomon Comissiong has written on this issue. His article entitled, “The White Supremacist Infiltration of Rap Music” is an excellent description of the situation. I have his book too entitled, “A Hip Hop Activist Speaks out on Social Issues.” It is a great read.

      0
    • noirluv45

      I’m going on Amazon right now to find that book, truth. Thank you!

      0
    • noirluv45

      Looks like it’s not available on Amazon, so I’m going elsewhere to find it.

      0
    • [email protected]

      OK.

      0
    • Primmest Plum

      It’s not just rap/hip hop culture. It’s also, quiet as it’s kept, porn culture. Pornography is highly impressionable on young men and boys and in this day and age it is more accessible and misogynistic as ever. There are a few documentaries about the sex industry (the names escape me now) but it was a real eye opener for me. It also made perfect sense.

      Anything media related is mostly run by (white) men. The sex industry is no exception. These portrayals of women are more damaging than we realize or want to give credit to.

      0
    • I agree. I saw a documentary on the psychological effects of porn on men and boys and it is far more damaging than rap music.

      0
    • trish

      Very good question indeed. My take on that is a little bit of rap, but also parenting. It seems respect isn’t taught the way it used to be the way it was when I was growing up. There was a time that I recall when not only would your parents discipline you, but so could anyone in the neighborhood who saw you acting up. Our community was strong and united and I don’t ever recall the nonsense you see going on today happening that much back than, but now it’s a different game and you there is no sense of self or community anymore. And that saddens me. We need to bring back the old school ASAP

      0
    • noirluv45

      Thank you, trish. You see, I grew up in the same kind of community where it did take a village to raise a child. Yes, ma’am, neighbors would not hesitate to chastise a child, and when the child got home, they KNEW they were in trouble with the parent(s).

      I agree with you. I’m all for bringing back old school.

      0
    • SimplePseudonym

      Nope. Women have been raped (including gang raped) since forever and continue to be raped all around the world. It doesn’t discriminate based on race, religion, socioeconomic status, level or liberalism or conservatism, if you’re wearing a burqa or walking around naked, age, what kind of music rapists listen to, etc. It’s is a ubiquitous human problem.

      0
    • noirluv45

      You’re right, Simple Pseudonym, but I wonder if some of these boys, in this day and age, listening to the misogynistic contents of music all the while seeing these video props (women) as a piece of meat lessens there respect for women. I’m not saying it’s fully to blame, but does it help?

      0
    • SimplePseudonym

      It definitely doesn’t help, but I was simply answering the posed question which was “Do you all think the rap/hip hop culture is to blame for the insensitivity toward women?”

      Rap song lyrics are the WORST when it comes to how they portray how women should be treated. Gang rapes are nothing new, it’s just that rape culture is so real that rapists don’t feel ashamed to share that info on social media.

      But, as I said, boys listening to hip hop seem no more or less likely to participate in a gang rape than men who listen to country music, Catholic hymns (looking at priests), or anything other genre of music.

      0
    • noirluv45

      You know, what I should have said was “contribute” instead of “to blame for.” My bad. :-D

      0
    • Nerdstradamas

      This is a good question. Pop/youth culture doesn’t showcase many complex female figures. Many women are reduced to the sum of their body parts and their sexiness. A bit off topic, but I am just disgusted at how quick the term Thot caught on. It was as if the public was just salivating and waiting for a brand spanking new term to further denigrate women. There’s an unusual joy in degrading women and girls. We’ve been completely dehumanized. That’s why these acts are so prevalent and people are able to empathize with the perpetrators. I fear for our future.

      0
    • noirluv45

      Yes. I agree with you all the way.

      0
  2. habinerenmei

    Their lives aren’t over. Their lives will be harder. There are people that go to jail and turn their lives around. I’ve met a few, because my father was a guard in a jail. Men would come up and thank him for treating them like a person rather than an animal. I hope these guys, get help and change their way of thinking about women

    0
  3. Elizabeth Aspen

    Why are you using words like “alleged victim” if there is actual video showing her being raped? And while we’re on the word rape, why are you using words like “sexual assault”? There is no such thing as sexual assault, battery, molestation, abuse or whatever other nonsense word the criminal injustice system wants to throw after the word ‘sexual’. There is only RAPE.

    0
  4. Nerdstradamas

    The defense for hip hop has a lot of backwards logic I can’t keep up with. So, for the most part, I am opting out of the culture. I guess I am one of those uppity Black folks that don’t know the struggle. If Hip Hop crumbles, so be it.

    The justification for many of the destructive themes in hip hop makes my head whirl (bitch is a term of endearment, except for when its not. These rappers are artists and they are simply playing a role. But these same artists are considered fake if they really aren’t about that life. Get money at any and all costs, even if it’s at the expense of other Black people. Complain about hardships and struggle. At the same time glamorize and help perpetuate those same hardships and struggles) It’s weird. And it doesn’t make sense to me.

    0
    • noirluv45

      Nerdstradamas, the whole of society is a contradiction. It is weird, and it doesn’t make sense to me either.

      0
  5. noirluv45

    Yes, indeed, DreaMLC.

    0
Comments are moderated, please be respectful. View our policy.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

More in Ashari Wilson, Craig Howe, Elmwood Park, Justin draper, nj
Close