Photo Credit: NTY

Photo Credit: NTY

Over the course of the Atlantic Slave Trade approximately 450,000 Africans were brought to the United States, scholars has estimated. Since then, U.S. has not seen such a large influx of African-born Blacks until now, according to the New York Times.

Between 2000-2010 the amount of legal Black African immigrants in the United States has doubled to nearly one million. The newspaper states more Black Africans migrated to this country during that decade alone compared to the Atlantic Slave Trade.

As a result of the influx, U.S. demographics have changed. New York State, in particular, “is home to the largest proportion and many have gravitated to ethnic enclaves like Little Senegal in West Harlem or the Concourse Village section of the West Bronx.” However, compared to Caribbean immigrants, African immigrants are more prone to move across the nation vs. staying clustered in one region.

“To live among fellow Ghanaians, black immigrants from Africa have tended to disperse more widely across the country — to California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Texas and Virginia — than Caribbean-born blacks,” the writer notes.

The report continues to compare African immigrants, Caribbean immigrants and native-born Blacks. It says, “30 percent of African-born blacks in the city had a college degree, compared with 22 percent of native-born blacks, 18 percent of Caribbean-born blacks and 19 percent of the nonblack foreign-born.”

To read the full article click here.

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  • Anthony

    That is a nice, short article. I don’t see a big deal in African immigrants not identifying too closely with African American history. As the article says, the black population of America has just become more diverse, and there is nothing wrong with that.

  • J.R

    I am African, funny thing is though, even though we have different cultures, we unite when it comes to issues affecting all of us, not just negative media stuff, even growing this natural hair movement.

  • J.R

    I am African, funny thing is though, even though we have different cultures, we unite when it comes to issues affecting all of us, not just negative media stuff, even growing this natural hair movement.

    I also wish that all these Africans in the US, invest back home because Africa is growing, there’s a lot of business entrepreneural opportunities that everyone should be interested in.