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During an interview with Anderson Cooper, Michael Singleton, the teen who got whooped on tv by his mother in Baltimore, spoke out about the incident and explained that he was embarrassed by his actions. Singleton also explained why he went to the mall and picked up a brick in the first place.

“My friends were down there, my friends have been beaten by police, killed by police, so I felt I needed to go down there to show my respect,” he told Cooper. “[When I saw my mom] I was like, ‘Oh man. What is my mother doing down here?'”

Singleton, who is 16, also understood why his mother reacted the way she did, even though others have been coming down on her.

“She didn’t want me to get in trouble (with the) law. She didn’t want me to be like another Freddie Gray,” he said.

Personally, I’m not sure how I would have reacted if I had a son and saw him in the same situation. I may not have done what his mother did, but I definitely wouldn’t have acted calmly.

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  • noirluv45

    Now that both sides have explained themselves, I’m hoping attention gets back to why all these riots and unrest have been happening in the first place. The media will do everything to divert our attention away from why this boy was out there in the first place. Moving on.

  • _a_

    I really wish the media would let this go.

  • Mary Burrell

    Time to move on and get to the real matter of police brutality. Diversion tactics and deflation as usual.

  • Mary Burrell

    Plus the other angle of this scenario white people like seeing black men brutalized.

    • [email protected]

      That’s a great point. White racists almost have a sick fetish in seeing black people being harmed or brutalized in public. Yes, the real issue in combating the epidemic of police brutality.

    • joe

      Black parents beating their children to appease white folks dates back to the slave plantation.

    • Mary Burrell

      @joe: i have read about that in regards to black parenting