TIME

TIME

Whenever a study is released about children from interracial couples, a friend immediately sends it to me because he finds it fascinating, that even though I’m from an interracial marriage, he never sees me in the study.

Take for example this recent study from Lauren Davenport, professor of political science at Stanford. According to her research, daughters of interracial couples are more often describing themselves as multiracial, because it makes them seem more intriguing.

My friend, who has known me since I was 9, found it hilarious that they used the word ‘intriguing’, especially since it’s nothing I would use to describe myself, and also because I’ve never referred to myself as multiracial, biracial, or anything but black; even though my father is Irish. I typically joke around with friends and say that I’m “Barack Biracial”…meaning I’m brown, if I didn’t tell you I was biracial, you’d just think I was black. And I’m fine with that. And my father was the one who made it clear to me as a kid, “Say it loud, you’re black and you’re proud”.

But back to the study.

From Time:

She discovered that gender played a big role in whether children of interracial parents identified themselves as multiracial. Among children of black-white unions, 76% of the female freshmen defined themselves as multi-racial. Only 64% of male freshmen from the same background did.

A similar pattern held true for children of Latino-white unions, with 40% of females defining themselves as multi-racial, but only 32% of guys, and for children of Asian-white unions, with 56% of females, and only 50% of males.

Why? Davenport speculates in her study that in general it may be easier for biracial women to cross between societies, because they are stereotyped as “a mysterious, intriguing racial ‘other,’’ while biracial men may be more likely to be perceived simply as ‘people of color.’ Davenport’s argument: “the different ways that biracial people are viewed by others influences how they see themselves.”

“How biracial people choose to identify is more than an assertion of their racial group attachments,” she writes. “It also has real political consequences.” These include the distribution of political resources, the implementation of affirmative action policies, and the enforcement of anti-discrimination laws.”

Some people may say that I’m denying my Irish background, which I’m quite fond of, if I only say that I’m black. But the only thing I’m denying is the fact that I don’t need anyone to tell me how to define myself. But if there are those out there who feel think it’s more intriguing, then I’m just going to assume that’s the only thing they have going for themselves.

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  • [email protected]

    Just as biracial people have the right to call themselves black or biracial (if they desire in a free society), we have the right to say that biracial people are not superior to black people. The one drop rule was instituted to not only promote racism, but it was used by racists to fight against the movement for black liberation. Biracial people are human beings and they should be treated fairly and have human rights. No biracial person should be disrespected. Likewise, we are in fight against white racism. Historically, the powers that be have exploited biracial people to prop up a system of light privilege including faux beauty standards that has infected Hollywood and various other industries. That’s a fact. When some people call biracial people “intriguing,” some of them are really trying to promote the myth of the superiority of the biracial image (or some want to fetishize biracial people as “exotic”). We know the truth. We know that Blackness has been around for the eons of time and it will still be here in the future. We know that the leaders of the black struggle included strong black people who knew what time it is. The black image is the first human image and Black is Beautiful.

  • Mr logical guy

    Race is a social construct. We are ethnicities. Race is more about culture and on those terms I do identity as a black man.

    • Beauty In Truth

      Race and ethnicity is a biological construct as our genetic blueprint foundations are a 100% real thing. You are black. It’s not just what you “identify as.” Our physical builds are different, mannerisms, somethings are just biological. So please do not attempt to play light with what is clearly a scientific and observatory standard. Thank you.

    • Mr logical guy

      Ethnicity is biological, race is not. So tell me if you’re 49% west African are you still black? What’s the difference between being biracial and the average black American who’s around 75% West African? I know people who are less then 40% African descent but still consider themselves black……….now go to Latin America and it’s the opposite. One drop of european blood will make you white.

      That’s literally the description of the term social construct cause it’s based on subjective opinions and not biology. Black, white, brown, yellow and any other colors are too broad to be considered science based. More like pseudoscience.

    • Beauty In Truth

      Okay, don’t have time,nor am I being paid to engage with your type of “brotha.” Keep sleeping sir, keep sleeping….Pop!, pop!, pop!

    • Mr logical guy

      Exactly…….you can’t answer my simple question because there is no answer. Race is culture base and didn’t existence 400 years ago.

      You’ve been condition to think a lot of things but that doesn’t make what you believe true.

    • Beauty In Truth

      Believe me, I’m probably one of the least “conditioned” people there are on this planet.

    • Mr logical guy

      I’m actually pretty curious about what you think as far as who’s black and who’s not. What percentage of African descent blood do you need to be considered black? 70% 51% 38% 20%? Know one can answer that simple question and we all know why.

  • [email protected]

    “Study: Daughters of Interracial Couples More Likely To Say They’re Multiracial Because It’s ‘Intriguing’”
    Nope just like others they just want to distance themselves as far away from black as they can.

    • Tina

      Um, can you blame them?

    • WhyNot?

      But you are spending your precious time trolling among us, huh? That says more about you than it does us..

    • [email protected]

      nope!