What if you could delete the memory that causes you the most pain?

It almost sound like science fiction, but it’s very much real.

Researchers say they think they’ve figured out a way to erase painful memories and post-traumatic stress. In the study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team of scientists lead by University of California- Los Angeles professor, David Glanzman report the discovery of a new protein, PKM. The study found that PKM is associated with people’s most painful memories.

Though it is premature to think that that one could recreate the cult classic Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Glanzman, a cellular neuroscientist, says the results make for a promising start.

“I think we will be able to alter memories someday to reduce the trauma from our brains. Not in the immediate future, but I think we will be able to go into one’s brain, identify the location of the memory of a traumatic experience and try to dampen it down.”

The discovery of the PKM protein may benefit most for war veterans and victims of violent crimes who suffer from post-traumatic syndrome. However, it almost make me wonder what would happen if the Jim Carrey experiment of Sunshine really came to life?

The movie, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (one of my favorite films of all time), posed a very interesting question: would you erase a painful memory in an attempt to find happiness with a clean slate? I won’t spoil the movie for anyone who has not seen it, but let’s just say the film version showed that erasing heartbreak or pain from your memory is about as hard as truly moving on. Still I have to think, would I remove a period of time, a phase from my recollection to have a spotless mind?

What say you Clutchettes? Tell us what you think- share your thoughts!

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  • missyjustice

    As much as remembering some things from my past hurts, I wouldn’t erase the memories because they made me who I am today and I really would be a completely different person had I not gone through some of those hard times. I surely would not be as empathetic, strong, or compassionate as I am now. But I’d also be more trusting and likely more carefree….

  • jane

    We are the sum of our experiences. I would not do it.