Yesterday Chicago-born rapper Lupe Fiasco sat down for an interview with CBS’ What’s Trending, a show that takes a look at what’s happening on Twitter.

During the interview, Fiasco discussed the challenges he went through to release his album, Lasers, the power of Twitter, and his political views.

When the asked about the political nature of his album, Lupe had some pretty interesting things to say about his Chi-Town brethren, President Obama.

“My fight against terrorism, to me, the biggest terrorist is Obama in the United States of America,” Lupe said.

He continued, “For me, I’m trying to fight the terrorism that’s causing the other forms of terrorism. You know the root cause of terrorists is the stuff the U.S. government allows to happen. The foreign policies that we have in place in different countries that inspire people to become terrorists.”

Despite his political views and stance on President Obama, Lupe Fiasco went on to tell host Shira Lazar that he doesn’t vote because it’s meaningless.

“I don’t vote. No I don’t vote. I don’t get involved in politics. It’s meaningless. To be honest,” he said. “If I’m going to say I stand behind this person and write on a piece of paper that says, ‘yeah I stand for this person,’ then I have to take responsibility for everything he does cause that’s just who I am as a human being. So politicians aren’t going to do that because I don’t want you to bomb some village in the middle of nowhere.”

While I believe Lupe’s point of view is admirable, it’s a little too easy to critique a system and a process that you feel is meaningless without offering up an alternative. Instead of simply labeling the President as a terrorist, Lupe should work to offer solutions (or support those who do) to our country’s and our world’s problems. #JustSaying

What do you think Clutchettes and Gents? Is Lupe Fiasco right? Is President Obama a terrorist?

Let’s talk about it!

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  • kYm

    I had a bad taste in my mouth after I heard his comments. As a journalist, I had to step up to the plate and take Lupe F I A S C O to task. Read my article. Leave a comment.

    http://tinyurl.com/4y9yzbz

    Holla.Black @ kYm

  • edub

    “My point is that there shouldn’t be an imbalance in the outrage. Somewhat like black Americans raising Cain over police involved shootings of black people but seem almost muted to the reality of the overwhelming amount of black-on-black crime that has more of an impact. Right now America is enganged in asymetrical warfare and it seems like everyone has asymetrical outrage. Yes we can walk and chew gum at the same time: we can call out both the insiders and outsiders that are causing harm.”

    I don’t think there is an imbalance in the outrage. Just because one chooses to speak about one atrocity does not mean that they are turning a blind eye to the others. Me agreeing with Lupe in regards to his assessment of Obama does not mean that I don’t have an equal or greater level of outrage towards the situation of terrorism within the black community. We are on a thread addressing Lupe’s words about Obama. I agree with his assessment. That’s it. As I mentioned earlier, if we were talking about terrorism perpetuated and played out within our community, then I would have another set of arguments. Walking and chewing gum at the same time would entail that you would understand this.

    • Lea

      Excuse my condescendence here but any mention of the black community in my replies to you have been in the context of analogies. I wasn’t “accusing” you or Lupe of turning a blind eye to the “terrorism” within the black community, which is a real issue, but I was charging that you and Lupe were ignoring the terror that Muslim extremists commonly exact on their own people. Just like, *analogy alert* black people who ignore the more frequent black-on-black crime to focus on the exceptional cases of other-on-black crime.

      And it was established that you agree with Lupe. Just like I’ve made my case for why I disagree with him.

      ‘Nuff said.

    • edub

      “Excuse my condescendence here but any mention of the black community in my replies to you have been in the context of analogies. I wasn’t “accusing” you or Lupe of turning a blind eye to the “terrorism” within the black community, which is a real issue, but I was charging that you and Lupe were ignoring the terror that Muslim extremists commonly exact on their own people. Just like, *analogy alert* black people who ignore the more frequent black-on-black crime to focus on the exceptional cases of other-on-black crime.

      And it was established that you agree with Lupe. Just like I’ve made my case for why I disagree with him.

      ‘Nuff said.”

      *Logic FAIL alert*

      No, you tried to derail the argument by deflection and confusion by trying to assert that because I agree with Lupe, I am not only drinking Lupe’s Kool-aid, I don’t care about the plight within the black community. Meanwhile YOU haven’t even read Obama’s executive orders but go on to defend our government’s actions by saying Obama is not a terrorist because “hey look, they kill as much, if not more, than his policies do”.

      So, your argument suggests that you would also LOGICALLY support the following argument:

      Because black people kill each other at a disproportionate rate, a white guy killing a black guy is not a murderer

      So, unless you agree with the above sentiment, then no, you have not made your case.

      I do agree with you that war is necessary. However, we are not at war with Pakistan, Libya, Egypt, Jordan, Palestine, Iran, or Syria and we have no right to send drones, carry out covert military operations, bomb, and overthrow governments within these countries. These actions kills thousands of innocent people and IS terrorism.

    • Lea

      “No, you tried to derail the argument by deflection and confusion by trying to assert that because I agree with Lupe, I am not only drinking Lupe’s Kool-aid, I don’t care about the plight within the black community.”

      It is not my fault that analogies are too sophisticated for your one-track mind. And I find it interesting that you were so distracted by my use of black-on-black crime as an analogy. Because in my first reply to you I also mentioned intraracial crime stats in general and in specific, the affinity scam that Benie Madoff used to bilk fellow Jews out of their money to butress my analogy: the biggest threat most communities face is from within. So, come again, how was I accusing you of not caring about the “plight” facing the black community? I guess I was also accusing you of not caring about Jews too? Did my FDR-and-Nazis analogy also “confuse and distract” you?

      If I am guilty of anything it was assuming that you were sophisticated enough to understand the use of analogies as an argument approach.

      Even more fascinating (on a Freudian level) is how you turn around and use my analogy (without “distraction and confusion”) to make your own point: “Because black people kill each other at a disproportionate rate, a white guy killing a black guy is not a murderer [sic]” And to that I will just refer you to my 2nd reply to you in which I talked about (and you specifically responded to) “‘asymetrical’ outrage.” So, huh?

      You admonish me for you admitting to only being aware of many of Pres. Obama’s executive orders as opposed to reading them first hand but evidently my awareness was spot on because you didn’t reveal anything more incriminating than those predator drones. As I stated before: damned if America does and damned if America doesn’t. In at least four of the countries you’ve cited many of the citizens of those very states (not to mention activists around the world) want America to do more. That’s to say nothing of those human rights activists who ironically question why the U.S. only focuses on certain countries accused of “crimes against humanity.” If America was using covert military ops to save the people in the Darfur region of Sudan, who have long suffered genocide, I’m sure it would be applauded.

      And I guess I see terrorism in large part as a matter of intent. America isn’t intending to kill or make enemies of the innocent. Whereas conversely, Osama Bin Laden and his followers intended to kill and make enemies of innocent people including (and largely) fellow Muslims. Coincidentally, Salon.com has an interesting article about abolitionist John Brown’s use of violence to combat slavery. You may want to read it, but I must warn you it is heavy in analogies and metaphors as well as moral ambivalence regarding today’s war on terror.

      http://www.salon.com/books/history/index.html?story=/politics/war_room/2011/06/12/lafantasie_john_brown

      Lastly, paradoxically, you draw a moral equivelancy between America and terrorists, yet hold America largely accountable thereby acknowledging America’s moral authority. As in: America should know better because it is better or at least carries the air of being better.

    • edub

      No, your ‘analogy’ was an attempt to derail an “argument’ (and I use that term very loosely because you fail to grasp basic logic). The problem is you take an air of intellectual superiority (FAIL), get caught up in verbiage (or is that garbage?, because half of what you have written does not even make sense), and lack the humility to step back and look at what you have actually said.

      Stuff like:
      “in at least four of the countries you’ve cited many of the citizens of those very states (not to mention activists around the world) want America to do more.”

      and

      “America isn’t intending to kill or make enemies of the innocent. Whereas conversely, Osama Bin Laden and his followers intended to kill and make enemies of innocent people including (and largely) fellow Muslims.

      tells me all I need to know about you and your thought process ( I am about 99% sure that your passport has never hit the desk of any country in the middle east).

      Since you can’t stay on topic (but love to answer stuff that is completely irrelevant to the topic at hand) let’s focus this discussion with the following questions. Do more? Do you even know what “doing more” means? If so, what does it mean? Who created Bin Laden? How many fellow muslims has he killed in comparison to the numbers the US has killed? What is the primary reason why we have muslim terrorists? Who is behind that reason? How?. There’s more to the story than what CNN, tells you. Travel abroad, speak to the people, live there, take notes. Then come back to me.

      Go grab a coffee and breathe into a brown paper bag; I am not the committee member who rejected your application to Harvard Law School.

  • Penny

    I think it’s scary and sad when any black man chooses not to vote. I think he is taking the stance of a victim, which, in my opinion, is totally unappealing. It’s all just so whiny and passive aggressive of him. So in his mind, it’s better to be completely inactive in the game – let someone else decide for him. That is exactly what certain people want black people to do. If voting didn’t matter, then so many people would not have fought for our right to vote and people would not have been harassed, beaten and even killed for just trying to get black people registered to vote back in the day. Black people are not yet in the position to just not care about voting; we don’t have that luxury.

  • nm

    Either the drugs are stronger or some people are getting dumber.