From The Grio — Back in 2008 when comedian/actor/philanthropist/activist/America’s Dad Bill Cosby announced he was releasing a hip-hop album filled with clean raps and positive messages (which became 2009’s Bill Cosby Presents the Cosnarati: State of Emergency, the response was mostly hearty laughter.

Nevermind that the image of the former Jell-O pudding spokesman donning a doo-rag and spitting hot fire in the studio was simply hilarious (he outstourced the actual rapping, so no worries that this actually happened), the idea of releasing a curse word free rap album in this current era was laughable.

Cursing and rap are bosom buddies by now, 20+ years after Ice-T had the dubious honor of bearing the first Parental Advisory sticker in hip-hop on his debut album Rhyme Pays.

OK, so Lupe Fiasco’s first album, 2006’s Food & Liquor, has all of three curses in the entire 70 minute run, but it’s an anomaly in today’s hip-hop world. Which is why it’s a bit surprising to hear that Kanye West protege Kid Cudi plans to release his upcoming third album, by his side-group WZRDsans curses and the infamous n-word. According to him it will be “a universal album for everyone.”

Foregoing cursing doesn’t necessarily mean the album will be for “everyone,” but Cudi’s motive is clear. He wants to make his album appealing to the segment of the population that has never embraced profanity in music. It’s a relatively bold move, given the current unspoken conventional wisdom that the way to become more marketable is to increase profanity usage. Could this strategy actually work?

Cudi need look no further for an example of a rapper who didn’t curse and was still loved by many than the recently departed Heavy D. The “overweight lover” was laid to rest earlier this week and people from all over came to pay their respects to the man and his legacy, which includes being “a fav of my momma’s,” as Q-Tip once put it on the track “Don’t Curse.” On this song, Hev challenged a crew of some of hip-hop’s most respected emcees (Kool G Rap, Big Daddy Kane, CL Smooth, Grand Puba, and the aforementioned Q-Tip) to do an entire verse without cursing.

Combined with his generally lovable demeanor, fun subject matter, and penchant for dancing, his refusal to use curses in his rhymes made him a family friendly emcee. He rode that appeal to three platinum and two gold albums. However, unlike what Cudi has planned, Hev wasn’t shy around usage of the “n-word.” He was, after all, the architect of the posse cut “A Bunch of N****s” from 1993’s Blue Funk album.

(Continue Reading @ The Grio…)

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  • fuchsia

    If anybody can do this, it will be Kid Cudi he is very versatile and he has a wide diverse following. I really like him already but now I may be able to introduce him to people who are less inclined to listen to rap music because of the profanity.

  • chakalaka

    i will definitely support this!

  • Praises to Kid Cudi for stepping up to the plate, taking a stand for human decency, self-respect, pride, honor and dignity and most of all by demonstrating the strength, courage and nobility to do the RIGHT thing showing respect for himself and his race. If you are in agreement with this move, don’t just put it all on Cudi’s shoulders, you must stand up and be counted just as he is doing, you can do this by signing the petition denouncing use of the n-word. To learn more go to:

    http://www.change.org/petitions/black-african-americans-to-denounce-and-stop-referring-to-one-another-as-the-n-word-ngahs?share_id=KieLfUvvjt&pe=d2e

  • The Comment

    Jesus! Only the very ignorant NEED profane words to rhyme.

  • Girl

    I wish him well. WE cant keep getting mad at others using the n-word when rap artists keep giving them lee-way. watch Ye and Jay-Z in concerts, making their audience repeat their lyrics esp the n-word and seeing taht alot of their fans are non-black, what the hell does one expect?
    Hopefully others will learn from Cudi