From Frugivore — A new campaign by Strong4Life is causing quite a stir amongst childhood obesity critics. The organization has launched a series of print ads, TV commercials, billboards, and online videos under the mantra, “Stop sugarcoating it,” encouraging Georgia communities to face up to their current status as claiming the second highest rate of childhood obesity in the United States, barely behind the number one record holder, Mississippi. The ads feature cameos of obese children discussing the challenges of being overweight, including bullying and health illnesses. One ad even goes so far to feature an obese child asking his obese mother why he is fat.

While there seems to be a consensus that anti-obesity campaigns need more leverage, critics disagree over the target of Strong4Life´s campaign, children. Many argue that childhood obesity campaigns should address the parents of obese children, as they primarily control the diets of their children. Others feel that the campaign needs a stronger educational approach, not simply an appeal to human emotion.


(Continue Reading @ Frugivore….)

 

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  • fuchsia

    I agree with the above comment. Besides the parents I think the school is also responsible for teaching nutrition and actually serving more nutritious foods. Recess, P.E. sports and general exercise should also be a priority. Since the school system doesn’t care about our kids then it’s up to to the parents to take the extra steps. It should start and continue from kindergarten.

    • MarloweOverShakespeare

      It really starts in the womb. Babies are predisposed to their mom’s diet. So if mom has a high sodium intake, that child will have a hard time eating low-sodium meals. I’ve witnessed this happen. Doesn’t mean it’s too late though.

    • “Since the school system doesn’t care about our kids then it’s up to to the parents to take the extra steps”

      You think! Yes, parents should take the extra steps to ensure THEIR CHILDREN are provided nutrious foods. Let’s remember kids do not have to eat school breakfasts and lunches. Also parks, playgrounds, outdoor spaces are everywhere. No parent should expect others to take care of their kids better than they can..

  • MarloweOverShakespeare

    Do I think it will help? If this brochure is really geared for the eyes of adults ONLY, I say absolutely.

  • lestin

    Just finished Harris’s piece about microaggressions and then saw this… wow. What a message to pound into a fat kid’s head every day.

  • Racial Rachel

    It’s cyclical.

    1. Poorer people have less money, time, energy, and resources to wealthy eating, excuse me, healthy eating. If you work all day and have a large single parent household where the oldest child might be cooking, you’ll probably be having raman and hot pockets.
    2. Eating can be a psychological and emotional response to outside pressure. Poverty creates stress, which induces unhealthy habits like drinking, smoking, and eating trash.
    3. Unhealthy food is cheap, in ready abundance in the hood, and labeled to incite those easily susceptible to bright colors and brand names…hmmm…where do I see people wearing flashy colors and large brand names….

    I actually took a class on obesity in undergrad. Sleep patterns, water intake, stress levels, genetics, and culture play a large role in obesity.

    Don’t get me started on the culture. Greed is normalized in this society. Exercise comes off as a luxury activity. My mom read to us, so now we read. My mom played tennis with us, so now we exercise. How many parents send their kids out to play but don’t go with them? So staying in becomes an adult activity, a rite of passage. Screens have definitely contributed to obesity, especially when people let televisions and computers babysit.

    Also, there is the idea that behaving well means sitting down quietly and not bothering me while I talk on the phone or do my nails. Don’t be running around the house, don’t be playin’ outside with those hoodrats, sit yo’ azz down somewhere…so kids sit and eat out of boredom and emotional depravity.

    Cultural reform and socioeconomic reform are in order.

    • LemonNLime

      “1. Poorer people have less money, time, energy, and resources to wealthy eating, excuse me, healthy eating. If you work all day and have a large single parent household where the oldest child might be cooking, you’ll probably be having raman and hot pockets.”

      I see what you are saying but I have a hard time seeing that as an excuse. Some of the cheapest, high yield, and healthy food in super markets are things like dried beans, lentals, flour, oatmeal, and rice. That in itself can serve as a good base that can be supplemented with fruits and veggies. Our grandparents grew up during the depression and still managed to eat healthfully, nothing is stopping people from starting same gardens, many farmers markets accept food stamps, and there are food banks that give out fresh produce. You can feed a family of 4 a healthy meal on $10-15 without going to Burger King. Many of these meals can be prepared in a short amount of time OR with the aid of a crockpot can cook all day while family members work. I believe there are ways to work around these challenges if you make the effort and want to.