From The Grio —  “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.” The safest way for President Barack Obama to acknowledge the role that race played in the killing of Trayvon Martin without saying the words “black” or “racism.” He personalized it, empathizing on the level of parenthood, and hinted at the fear that young black men deal with on a daily basis, and the fear of those who love them.

“All of us have to do some soul searching to figure out how something like this happened” is about as close to saying “we must address racism in this country” as is politically possible for Obama to say without redress. His short statement was as good as it gets.

I was among those who didn’t particularly care to hear the president weigh in on the killing of Trayvon Martin, for which George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old self-appointed neighborhood watch captain that shot him, has still not been arrested. There didn’t seem to be anything to gain, since the president elicits such hatred from certain segments of the country, best known as Republican wingnuts, that pounce on any and every thing he says in order to fabricate a scandal.

WATCH ‘ED SHOW’ COVERAGE OF THE CONSERVATIVE REACTION TO TRAYVON:

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I wasn’t interested in hearing the president’s political opponents weigh in on any remark the he may have made regarding Trayvon by accusing him of race-baiting or polarizing the country,dividing when he should be uniting, or placing the concerns of “special interests” above those of the nation as a whole, dabbling in local law enforcement issues when the economy is still in recovery, or whatever else they may cook up.

And I would hate to see pundits discuss new polling information on how the “Trayvon Martin issue” would affect Obama’s re-election prospects. I didn’t, and still do not, wish to see Trayvon’s 17-year-old life and tragic death become a political talking point.

So when he was asked the question at the end of a press conference introducing Jim Yong Kim as his nominee to the World Bank, I held my breath for a brief moment. I was pleasantly surprised to hear his measured words that recognized the gravity of the situation, but refused to address the legalities and specifics of the case, and opted to empathize with the parents while giving subtle nods to the role race played. Again, it was as good as it gets, and, to my mind, there was little his political opponents could use to turn this into a partisan issue.

Enter Newt Gingrich.

 

(Continue Reading @ The Grio…)

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  • pink

    Who really gives a “S” about anything Newt, or Santorum has to say?? They are both just trying to stay relevant