After being inspired by President Obama’s endorsement of same-sex marriage, fifth grader Kameron Slade wrote a speech about tolerance he expected to deliver to his classmates. Unfortunately, his principal wasn’t feeling it and called the 10-year-old’s efforts “inappropriate,” dashing Kameron’s dreams of delivering his speech before his peers.

Thankfully, local news station NY1 picked up Kameron’s story and he was able to deliver his speech to a much bigger audience: the City Council.

Yesterday, Kameron addressed members of the City Council, confidently delivering his speech.

“President Barack Obama recently talked about same-sex marriage with his wife and two daughters. Some people are for same-gender marriage, while others are against it,” Kameron told them.

“Like President Obama, I believe that all people should have the right to marry whoever they want. Marriage is about love, support, and commitment. So who are we to judge?”

Joined by his parents and grandfather, Kameron said he felt honored to deliver his speech in front of the city’s politicians.

“I feel honored because not many people get to do this,” he told the New York Times.

 

*Photo and video via The New York Times

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  • The Comment

    I completely understand why school officials would not let a 10 yr-old deliver a speech on gay marriage. The news station is exploiting the young man under the guise of giving him a larger audience. A weird win-win for the media and young man but I stand by the schools decision with an understanding that Slade is not too young to understand basic human rights.

    • Sweetles

      You hit the nail on the head.

    • Elaine53206

      To say that he is too young to understand basic human rights is ridiculous. Chidlren aren’t blind and stupid. If he were to say do unto others… would you applaud? How is that different?

    • brownbabay

      She didnt say that. She said she understands both reasoning.

    • The Comment

      That question would have cost you dearly on the GRE exam.