Hairstyle bans may seem outdated to some, but Sid Credle, dean at Hampton University’s business school, believes they are legitimate and even necessary. Credle placed a ban for the business school’s MBA program in 2001 barring students from wearing cornrows or dreads to class. Credle sees it as an effort to help them land corporate jobs.

Apparently, dreads and cornrows won’t get you hired in the corporate world. Credle offers up the school’s stats as proof that the ban has been effective. “We’ve placed more than 99 percent of the students who have graduated from this school, this program,” he said to WVEC.

But not everyone agrees the ban is fair. An incoming freshman, Uriah Bethea, who has dreadlocks, told WVEC: “I don’t think it shouldn’t matter what the hairstyle. It’s my life. I should be able to do whatever I want to do.” Instead of changing his hairstyle, he added, “I would just find another major.”

Credle and a Hampton spokesperson, Naima Ford, maintain their ban is not to deter students from the program nor police their hairstyles, but to mirror successful business professionals. “These students choose to be in this program and aspire to be leaders in the business world. We model these students after the top African-Americans in the business world,” Ford said.

Credle adds that cornrows and dreadlocks aren’t necessarily tied to our culture. “When was it that cornrows and dreadlocks were a part of African American history? I mean Charles Drew didn’t wear, Muhammad Ali didn’t wear it. Martin Luther King didn’t wear it.”

Speak on it, Clutchettes: While Credle’s intentions seem good, do you believe a ban on hairstyles is really necessary or even effective?

Source

Tags:
Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter
  • Joan

    This serves as another reminder that becoming a real player (someone who has the power to make, break and rewrite the rules) in the business world is rarely encouraged in the black community, but becoming a well polished pawn is. Too often, we plan our entire lives based on what we think white people want. Encouraging that becomes much more important than encouraging innovation and creativity. We tuck our butts under, our lips in (or we get plastic surgery) and we fry our hair beyond recognition in desperate hope of getting hired by companies often started by people who had the guts (or encouragement, whether they are black, white, whatever) to be creative, innovative, and quite ironically, a rule breaker.

  • Blaque217

    I don’t like the idea of this ban, but it is going to prepare these students for the real world. White corporate America will not hire Black applicants with corn rolls, braids, etc. Maybe an entry level position, but not a top job that pays well.
    There is proof that many companies won’t call an applicant if their name “sounds Black”. So what do you expect them to do if they interview a person with braids and such. These young people have to play the game if they want to get their foot in the door. Once they have the job they can take a chance and grow their hair out. But to get in the game you have to play by THEIR rules.

  • This is why I don’t give a damn about White corp Amerikkka. I’m building my own business and will employ folks that corp amerikkka wont hire. I”m tired of trying to fit into a system that doesnt like me to start out with. This guys quote at the bottom is nothing less than a person suffering from Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome-shame indeed.

    “Credle adds that cornrows and dreadlocks aren’t necessarily tied to our culture. “When was it that cornrows and dreadlocks were a part of African American history? I mean Charles Drew didn’t wear, Muhammad Ali didn’t wear it. Martin Luther King didn’t wear it.”

  • I think this is ignorance on behalf of the administration at the school. First, the comment made about when the styles were connected shows ignorance and an intolerance for culture. Not only African Americans would want to attend the school. Also, What about a hasidic Jew with his long beard and side locks..? now we have a breach in the constitutional right to the freedom of religion. What about those from other nations – Jamaica for example like me who wear dreadlocks for a spiritual reason? What if I only want my MBA for purpose of working in Africa and NOT in corporate America? What if I want and MBA for the knowledge of being and entrepreneur – where my locks would not matter anyway as long as my product is good? Are they not willing to take my tuition money in exchange for teaching basic business practices? The assumption that all black males who wear locks will not get hired and the need to protect the schools history of getting people jobs afterwards is rediculous. Schools are for teaching not job placement. Not all want jobs either. IF we all wanted jobs then why teach entrepreneurial classes in the MBA. This school has shown its true colors and I will complete my MBA that I am currently enrolled in with my locks down to my backside and be proud to not be a part of a school that supports such ignorance.