Multi-racial business team sitting around an office boardroomWomen still don’t earn as much as men, though we comprise almost 50 percent of the workforce. However, there are some cities where women – particularly working mothers – are valued by lessening the income-gap.

Nerd Wallet, a site designed to financially empower consumers, compiled a list of the best places for working women to earn income comparable to men. The publication determined rankings based on three questions:

1.    Do women earn high salaries?

2.    Do women earn as much as men?

3.    Is the city growing?

The publication used this scale to determine the cities and then separated the best into small, medium and large categories. Clutch is highlighting the top five large cities on the list since most of these metropolises are thriving and drawing women of color.

Washington, D.C. ranks No. 1 on the list of best big cities for women in the workforce. Women living in D.C. earn a median wage of $55,688, but still earn more than 20 percent less than men. The other four metro areas on the list are San Francisco, Calif.; San Jose, Calif; Austin, Texas; and Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas.

Nerd Wallet describes the rankings as follows:

Washington, DC

DC women benefit from a high median salary and high population growth.  Politically minded women will find job opportunities on Capitol Hill, and the tourism industry is booming as well.  Home to several universities, DC offers plenty of research resources as well.

San Francisco, CA

Known for its tech jobs, San Franciscans benefit from a high median salary and steady population growth.  Muir Woods and Yosemite National Park are nearby, making nature easily accessible.

San Jose, CA

Nestled in Silicon Valley, San Jose is home to many tech companies, including Adobe, Hewlett-Packard and IBM.  Sports fans will enjoy the Bay Area’s many teams, including the San Jose Sharks, and residents earn a high median salary as well.

Austin, TX

Austin’s rapid growth makes it a great city for job seekers and women in the workforce.  An emerging tech hub, Austin has plenty of jobs in the tech industry or at the University of Texas.

Dallas-Forth Worth, TX

The Silicon Prairie is home to many telecommunications and information technology firms, and the area’s low cost of living and rapid population growth give the area great future prospects.

The full list of large cities includes Denver, Colo.; Los Angeles/Long Beach/Santa Ana, Calif; and the New York/New Jersey/Philadelphia area.

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You can see the full results of Nerd Wallet’s analysis on their website.

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  • bob

    I hate statistics because they can manipulate how the data comes out by what they choose to include, like did they include overtime , and what type of jobs men are working in comparison to women because I have no doubt that the fireman deserves to be compensated more than anyone working an simple admin position. I do not take none of these surveys at face value unless they explain in detail how they collected the data and give solid examples.

  • E.M.S.

    I’m proud my home area of the Bay is a good place for professional women, but then it also makes me sad. I’m a Bay Area native that moved to SoCal for college and I grew to love it down here to the point where I don’t want to return home after I graduate. But it looks like that might be a poor career move if I’d like a chance to make a little more, dang!

  • Curls&Swirls

    These surveys really need to include a blurb about cost of living. Of course in these cities (esp. DC) you would need to make more money, but when most of your money goes to basic living expenses, what good does it do?