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A Calgary woman recently learned that she would not be allowed to bring a multi-cultural child into the world, if she planned on using the Regional Fertility Program.  According to the anonymous woman, the fertility clinic restricts patients from using sperm, eggs or embryos from donors who do not match their ethnic background.

She was told she could only use sperm from donors who were white, like her.

“That’s when everything went downhill,” she told the Calgary Herald. “I was absolutely floored.”

The clinic’s administrative director, Dr. Calvin Greene, confirmed that his center would not treat couples or singles who insist on using donors of a different ethnicity.

“I’m not sure that we should be creating rainbow families just because some single woman decides that that’s what she wants,” he said. “That’s her prerogative, but that’s not her prerogative in our clinic.”

A statement on the clinic’s website reads: “it is the practice of the Regional Fertility Program not to permit the use of a sperm donor that would result in a future child appearing racially different than the recipient or the recipient’s partner.”

Greene noted that other doctors who work at the clinic also feel that “a child of an ethnic background should have the ability to be able to identify with their ethnic roots” and that a patient and their children should share a “cultural connection,” the Herald reports.

Well, apparently Canada isn’t post-racial after all.

 

Clutchettes, do you think the clinic should prevent multi-cultural children being “made”?

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  • Anastasia Hill-Thompson

    IDK. Being response for giving potential life of a child to an adult comes responsibility. Its a very slipper slope, but I think ethics should play a role.For example, what if someone came to you desiring a male sperm because the felt that female children are inferior or something like that? Would you give that couple a sperm knowing they have beliefs that are potentially damaging?

  • KamJos

    I’m not sure why everyone is automatically assuming she wants a Black baby (race wasn’t mentioned in the article) or that she wants it as some sort of accessory. From the article:

    ““I would ask you, why would you not choose somebody of your own cultural background?”

    Catherine said there are many reasons. By the time she narrowed down her pool of potential donors to those who met Canadian standards, had a good health history and a compatible blood type, she was left with only 20 or so Caucasian candidates to choose from. Many of them had already been used by several other patients in Calgary.”

    She didn’t want to choose from such a small pool of genetic donors who already had their genes spread throughout the city. No doubt her child would have to be careful when it comes to dating so that he/she wouldn’t end up being with half-siblings. I think that’s a valid concern. Choosing someone who had a lower donation rate would be one way to lessen the chance of this happening. It her body and her choice and she shouldn’t have to be forced to just choose Caucasian because some doctor made an assumption about who she is or her ability to care for it.