Ray-Rice-September-20141-e1410212706541

Following the indefinite suspension of former Baltimore Ravens Running Back Ray Rice, sources are stating Rice is considering filing a lawsuit against the NFL.

Sources close to Rice told the Baltimore Sun, Rice and wife Janay Palmer are taking into account all possible legal actions including double jeopardy, which is the prosecution of a person twice for the same offence. In addition to filing a suit, Rice is considering hiring a crisis management to guide him through this dilemma.

On Friday, Roger Goodell composed a letter addressed to the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) explaining his choice to enforce a stricter punishment for the running back.

Prior to the release of the video that shows an unconscious Palmer as a result of a hit thrown by Rice, Goodell suspended Rice for two games for violating the NFL personal conduct policy. Once the video was released it was then Goodell increased punishment to an indefinite suspension.

However, according to a policy in the collective bargaining agreement “One Penalty,” it states that, “The Commissioner and a Club will not both discipline a player for the same act or conduct. The Commissioner’s disciplinary action will preclude or supersede disciplinary action by any Club for the same act or conduct.”

Tags: , , ,
Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter
  • Ray Rice needs his butt whooped. Idiot. Double jeopardy applies to the legal system- not a private organization. YOU KNOCKED YOUR WOMAN SMOOTH OUT. SHUT UP AND DISAPPEAR.

    • rena215

      The doctrine of double jeopardy absolutely can apply to employment decisions.

      The NFL has a collective bargaining agreement with its union governing the terms and conditions of employment for its players. The CBA itself is governed by the National Labor Relations Act.

      A lot of CBAs require just cause to impose discipline, and there is a procedure for challenging discipline and other employer decisions, which usually involves filing a grievance, having that grievance internally reviewed, then having the decision made by an arbitrator selected by both the Union and Employer. The arbitrator has authority to make a binding decision in the case, which is almost impossible to overturn.

      In cases involving even private employers, arbitrators have imposed the doctrine of double jeopardy and prohibited an employer from disciplining an employee more than once for the same misconduct. The doctrine is rooted in what arbitrators believe to be “fundamental issues of fairness,” rather than any specific law. Whether the doctrine applies is very fact-specific, although I’ve only seen this doctrine applied when there is a just cause provision in the CBA (I’m not sure if the NFL has this heightened standard for discipline).

    • Steve

      Under the current Collective Bargaining Agreement(CBA) players are not subjected to “double jeopardy” as so stipulated in Chapter 46 of the agreement if I’m not mistaken. Which states: Players may not be punished by the their team and the NFL for the same infraction. So, Mr. Rice as a very compelling and good chance of winning this appeal.

  • ALM

    Rice is very bold. They have him on camera, and he is still fighting this. Someone came on another Rice post saying that they are a lawyer, and people don’t usually lose their jobs over domestic violence cases. The only way a person would not lose their jobs is if the other person does not press charges and/or their isn’t enough evidence.

    Trust and believe, if you assault someone at the mall and you are convicted, you WILL lose your job. There are still women online defending this man, and it is unbelievable.

    If he wins, all this means is that these NFL players are not going to be able to blink without the police showing up at their doors. They have already rounded up at least two other NFL players for domestic abuse since the Rice incident.

    What probably will result is a zero tolerance policy. If so, Ray Rice may want to go into hiding because a lot of other players are probably going to blame him for the stricter standards. They have been getting away with a lot, and they are going to be under much harsher scrutiny now.

    • rena215

      The doctrine of double jeopardy absolutely can apply to employment decisions.

      The NFL has a collective bargaining agreement with its union governing the terms and conditions of employment for its players. The CBA itself is governed by the National Labor Relations Act.

      A lot of CBAs require just cause to impose discipline, and there is a procedure for challenging discipline and other employer decisions, which usually involves filing a grievance, having that grievance internally reviewed, then having the decision made by an arbitrator selected by both the Union and Employer. The arbitrator has authority to make a binding decision in the case, which is almost impossible to overturn.

      In cases involving even private employers, arbitrators have imposed the doctrine of double jeopardy and prohibited an employer from disciplining an employee more than once for the same misconduct. The doctrine is rooted in what arbitrators believe to be “fundamental issues of fairness,” rather than any specific law. Whether the doctrine applies is very fact-specific, although I’ve only seen this doctrine applied when there is a just cause provision in the CBA (I’m not sure if the NFL has this heightened standard for discipline).

  • Mr. Z

    This just goes to show that an education is more important that athletic ability; imo. Double Jeopardy applies to the legal court, not private organizations.

    If he does hire a crisis management team to help him during this tough time, it’ll be easy money for them because he isn’t going to win this battle and I’m positive the NFL already knows that.