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Credit: Screenshot

Credit: Screenshot

Remember that video of a white woman walking down the New York City streets and being catcalled by over 100 men? There’s one problem with it. All the white guys who catcalled her were edited out. According to Slate, “the video is a collaboration between Hollaback!, an anti-street harassment organization, and the marketing agency Rob Bliss Creative. At the end they claim the woman experienced 100 plus incidents of harassment “involving people of all backgrounds.” Since that obviously doesn’t show up in the video, Bliss addressed it in a post. He wrote, ‘we got a fair amount of white guys, but for whatever reason, a lot of what they said was in passing, or off camera’ or was ruined by a siren or other noise. The final product, he writes, ‘is not a perfect representation of everything that happened.'” So then why are you making it look like on Black and Hispanic men catcall and street harass? Do better.

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  • harryx

    the editing of white men from this video made me think of Emmett Till who whistled at a white woman in Mississippi in 1955.

  • Darryl Hines

    19xx, most men I know do. Walking down the street most black men will give a head nod or a “what’s up” to another black man. It’s what we do. The intent isn’t always the same but it’s still a greeting and that happens often with women, too.

    • we got three things going on here this is not the first time women have pulled this stunt picking at man but what we got going here is with some of the sister we got classism they neither value or respect the working class black man, you got some sister who just don’t like men anyway so anything they do is wrong, then we got gentrification where upscale white women are moving into the intercity among black and Hispanic men and they are afraid and want of them and want the social engineers to do something about it for her comfort and naive black women are co-signing with her not realizing she is next.

  • Darryl Hines

    I guess my comment was overstated. I didn’t mean that “all” of the comments were typical of human interaction but it appeared that most were. To most, a hello or simple greeting isn’t offensive. What lies behind the greeting we can’t say but for those couple of men who said more or did more and supposedly offended the young lady then one could say that’s not typical. But let us remind ourselves—IT WAS AN EXPERIMENT! How many times have men greeted a woman or followed in an attempt to talk to her and she stopped, they interacted, eventually dated and sometimes married and had children? Billions is the answer.