Screen Shot 2015-02-24 at 9.07.45 AM

During Sunday’s Oscars, Zendaya Coleman opted from dreadlock extensions and a glamorous white gown. Although Coleman was a picture pretty beauty, Giuliana Rancic decided to slam the star’s hair on the Fashion Police. The forever emaciated looking Rancic stated that 18-year-old actress looks like she “smells like patchouli oil… or maybe weed.”

Not one to remain quiet when it comes to being the subject of conversation, Coleman eloquently schooled Rancic:

A photo posted by Zendaya (@zendaya) on

 

 

In typical fashion, Rancic then tweeted an apology to Coleman:

Which really isn’t an apology at all, of course. At the tender age of 18 years old, it’s a shame that  it seems as though Coleman has more knowledge about life than Rancic, but should we be surprised? Where’s Joan Rivers when we need her. At least her insults were at least funny.

Tags: , ,
Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter
  • K.C.

    Shade from a grown woman who looks like ET’s anorexic love child. Girl, please. How about get a real Journalism gig? Team Zendaya on this one!

  • Anthony

    Zendaya showed a huge amount of class and intelligence I her response. We black folks need to support this young woman, and not get hung up on her color as some of us did when she was criticized for playing Aliya (misspelled.) I honestly don’t remember what I said then, but I know I am her fan now!!

    • elsay

      Terribly unfair comments were written about her then.

    • Anthony

      I tend to agree. Basically, Zendaya had to prove her blackness to be accepted by some folks. I tend to be the opposite: I tend to accept folks until they give me a reason to reject them. She cannot help her color anymore than a woman with a banging body can help it if she gets more attention than a woman who is straight up and down.

    • elsay

      I tend to do the same.

    • Okay

      Sorry Anthony cant agree with this one. She said the right thing……this time. Last time I could not agree with her. Half black is black enough. Those were her words. And YES it IS a problem when biracial women and girls routinely play brown and dark skinned women in movies. The fact that she got it right this time does not negate that.

    • Anthony

      The Rancic situation shows that half black is black enough to catch hell for not being white. I have no interest in disputing the obvious reality of colorism, it is something that hits pretty close to home for me. My point is that getting treated better does not equal being treated fairly, and we as a people would be smart to maintain alliances rather than allow whites to Balkanize us along color lines.

    • elle D.

      YES to your entire comment—you said er uh wrote that!

    • Okay

      Half black is not black enough to portray a full black woman in a film. Lets not mix the two issues up. We all know what she was referring to when she stated that. That was a misstep on her part and her getting it right this time does not make up for that. And her being ‘black enough’ to catch hell does not mean we should sweep the issue of biracial women replacing black women in the media under the rug. Every time something like this happens thats what we try to do. In order for us to be allies I have to say ok to biracial women being the primary face of black women? I don’t think so. Its only seen as divisive when we point out the division is it? How is it not divisive for only one shade of women to portray the majority of black women? We’re already divided whether we want to see it or not. And pointing it out is not the problem. Keeping your head in the sand is. So whenever the issue comes up ‘remember white people are the enemy’ is often stated. So what happens? The people who spoke out against the primary casting of biracial women as black women are guilt tripped into silence and the issue gets swept under the rug.

    • Anthony

      I have never denied colorism. Since I am near retirement age, I suspect I am a lot older than you, and I have experienced being on the short end of colorism myself since I am a large, dark skinned, man. In my first post, I was not clear in what I was saying in that not wanting Zendaya to play Aliyah was fine, my problem was people who felt a need to question her blackness only to give her props for checking Guiliani Rancic.

      As for unity, I am grateful that someone like Walter White felt a need to help out his darker relatives, because he certainly could have lived a pleasant life as a white man if he had wanted to do so. The same goes Thurgood Marshall, and many more people than I can name.

    • Dayzed

      I love Zendaya, but disagreed with casting her as Aaliyah. It seemed like a smack in the face. The Zendaya casting essentially said that by today’s standards Aaliyah wouldn’t have been chosen to play herself in the movie (not to mention Missy and Timbaland).

      That said there was some real despicable underserved things said about Zendaya around here that were totally uncalled for.

    • Okay

      Bingo! But they dont hear you though. This is just like the casting of Zoe Saldana as Nina Simone. Nina actually wanted Whoopie Goldberg to play her! And remember that simply stating this is allowing “whites to Balkanize us along color lines” according to some. So we should just ignore the issue and act like its not there.

    • Anthony

      If you care to do a search, you can see where I was against Zoe Saldana playing Nina Simone. Frankly, my criticism of Saldana playing Simone has about as much to do with what I percieve her politics and identity to be as her color. That goes back to why I am supportive of Zendaya, since she is proving to be conscious in terms of African Ametican identity. Once again, my point is it would be smart not to avoid questioning anyone’s blackness unless there is clear evidence that a person does not identify with black people.

      Who gets a given role is an artistic matter, but when portraying real people, the actress should look at least somewhat like the person being portrayed. Similarly, casting like Cosby show with two brown or dark parents, three dark younger kids, and two clearly biracial older daughters was just goofy since the family was a biological family, not one with adoptions, or half siblings.

    • Okay

      Anthony,

      Anytime someone questions why a biracial woman who looks nothing like the brown/dark skinned woman she is portraying has been given the role thats questioning her blackness? So as long as a biracial person is black identified then they are free to take on the role of any black person? Anthony this is what happens every time this is questioned. Bottom line this is the excuse that is used whenever the question is asked. Well all mixed people are black so its not problematic that black women are not used to play black women. As far as Im concerned this is just a way to get people to shut up. Thats pretty much all there is to it.

    • Anthony

      You need to ask someone who thinks like that your question. I have already made it clear that I have no problem with questioning whether Zendaya, or any other actress, is right for a given role. I have said her blackness should not be questioned, not her access to roles. My first post did not clearly state my position, and that is my fault. I have since said what I think.

    • Okay

      Pot-ayto, Puh-tah-to. I say your waffling.

    • Anthony

      OK, you are entitled to your opinion.

    • Okay

      Rancic was insulting a hair style associated with blackness period. If it had been on a Japanese person I think most black people would have felt the same way. Would that make them hypocrites too?

    • Anthony

      You would still be selectively claiming Zendaya.

    • Okay

      OK even if its about the Japanese? Now thats a matter of your opinion.

    • Dayzed

      Not when you remember what Cliff’s dad looked like. He was light skinned. Within the context of the show I assumed Denise and Sandra took after grandpa.

    • Anthony

      Fair skinned is one thing, biracial is something else. If the Cosby Show casting made sense to you, your objection to Zendaya playing Aliyah looks pretty inconsistent because in this case, half black is black enough for you.

    • Dayzed

      1. The Cosby family is fictional. They are not based on real people. Aaliyah was a real person. No one is asking for her doppelgänger. It’s not unreasonable to expect the actress/actor playing a famous figure to bear a passing resemblance at the very least. You seem to be suggesting that it was an impossible feat to cast such an actress. It’s not. Your argument echoes the poor excuses made when POC characters in source materials are whitewashed for the big screen.

      The problem for me isn’t with Zendaya. I love that girl and have since she started out on Disney probably before you ever heard of her. I don’t have a problem with her being biracial or with her identifying as black. My problem is with the racist/colorist system that unfairly privileges girls who look like Zendaya over their darker skinned counter parts to the ridiculous point now where a gorgeous girl like Aaliyah, already rather light skinned herself, wouldn’t be chosen to play herself. Casted as Aaliyah, Zendaya unfortunately was the face of the problem, but let’s not forget the castings of Missy and Timbaland. Are you going to try to tell me that it would have been impossible to find a black male actor who looked even a little like Timbaland?

      2.You know features and skin tones can vary widely in black families. My dad and aunt have the same parents, but he’s dark skin taking after my grandma and my aunt is light skinned and freckled taking after my grandfather. A stranger wouldn’t think my dad and aunty were related let alone full blooded siblings. And it wouldn’t be a stretch by any means for some people to assume that my aunt is biracial. So, no, the casting of the fictional Cosby kids with their light skinned grandfather didn’t strike me as especially far fetched. Not when genetic variance is reflected in my family.

    • Anthony

      Whatever, I have been black more than half a century. You are not telling me anything that I don’t know when it comes to how complexions can vary in a family. I do not think the Cosby children looked realistic. I also said that I knew the difference between casting for Cosby and Aliyah was that Aliyah was a real person. For what it is worth, there are more than a few biracial people who are about the same color as Aliyah, who, as you said, was fair skinned. I don’t think you have been consistent in your arguments, and I know you don’t think much of my position either. You are not going to change my mind, and I am not going to change yours. I suspect you will feel the need to have the last word, so go for it.

    • Whitneys Receipts

      What happened here was wrong and she shouldn’t have been made to feel bad about her hair but let’s not act like colorism isn’t a big deal in Hollywood. Let’s not act like roles for dark skinned/monoracial black women and characters are being given to lightskinned/bi racial actresses.
      People were certainly justified in being offended with another role of a monoracial black woman going to someone biracial. You can be a fan of hers and have a problem with colorism and the “lightwashing” that takes place in Hollywood.

  • Mahogany

    Zendaya gave her a classy read. Why do they want us to conform to their white beauty standards when mist of them are trying to immulate us?

  • [email protected]

    Zendaya Coleman responded to Rancic with historical facts, class, and inspirational statements. It is a shame that in this generation that we have people who want to disrespect a young woman in such vicious terms. Locs are part of real human expression. Just because someone wears locs doesn’t mean that that they smell like weed, etc. Some individuals have to live in the 21st century and realize the dignity of people of color must be respected. People of all colors wear locs and our hair has the right to be shown in diverse ways (as beauty is diverse). Rancic’s obviously desperate apology was certainly a plan to save face. We will continue to defend not only locs, but justice too. I love that Zendaya listed India Arie. She is a great music who expressed classic records. Locs are here to stay.