The way you sign off on your e-mails makes more of an impression than you may realize and while we all might think we’re doing it right, we may in fact be getting it all wrong when it comes to the way we say our virtual goodbyes.

Bloomberg News
contributor Rebecca Greenfield recently shared her findings on some of the most common phrases that we all use to end our e-mails and what she had to share might not make you too happy. Among the sign offs that are least likely to make a genuine impression were words like “Best,” “Sincerely,” and “Regards,” while other commonly used phrases like “Yours,” and “Cheers,” tend to come off as dated or presumptuous.

So what is a good way to end your e-mails in 2015?

If you take the advice of Rebecca, not signing off at all is the way to go. Meaning, ending your e-mails with a blank space following your final remarks rather than a carefully crafted or insincere closing is apparently preferred. If you’re like us, this may not be such a smooth transition to make after years of instruction from elementary school teachers, high school tutors and even college professors have taught us to do just the opposite. However, it could at least be a fun experiment to try both methods and see if there’s any difference in the type of responses you receive.

So do you agree with this advice, Clutchettes? Or will you continue ending your e-mails the same way that you always have?

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  • i mean

    If I am asking for something I say “thank you,” if we are having a conversation, I don’t close it until the end. And I usually close it with a “best” or “take care.”