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Teen Vogue beauty editor Elaine Welteroth recently paid a visit to Kigali, Rwanda and while she was there decided to chronicle her hair braiding experience. Welteroth arrived in Rwanda with her naturally curly fro, but left with Senegalese twists.

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Welteroth wrote about the experience on Teen Vogue’s site:

Adopting this hairstyle became an integral aspect of drinking in the cultural experience as a first-time visitor to East Africa—women sported braids and twists everywhere. But I wasn’t sure how people would react back home in New York City.

At the office I found myself fielding responses ranging from shock to sheer confusion. (Wow! How did your hair grow so fast? Do you wash them? Is your hair still inside there? Those things look heavy! Don’t they hurt?) Sure, the questions were innocent enough; though, laced with ignorance, they started to make me feel like I was wearing a target on my head.

But once the story was published in the print edition of Teen Vogue, the backlash began, over the models chosen to showcase the braids.

The model, Phillipa Steele, who according to is half Fijian, and also Tongan, French, English, and American, sported the twists in the shoot and also was profiled on Instagram.

Twists, braids, and locs are not just GORGEOUS and perfect for summer, they represent strength and beauty, as @Zendaya so eloquently stated during the Oscars incident. In the June/July issue of @teenvogue I write about my personal experience rocking Marley Twists–and traveling all the way to Rwanda to learn about the rich history behind this hairstyle. It sheds light on the merging of culture, beauty, and activism through the lens of hair. I encourage you to pick up the issue or read the story online. So grateful to the brilliant team who brought this story to life [email protected] @phillipasteele @ladyalicelane @robbiefimmano @Andreaskokkino.

A photo posted by Elaine Welteroth (@elainewelteroth) on

The print article also included photos of Zendaya Coleman, wearing her faux locs, as well as Zoe Kravitz.


But people were offended that none of the models represented darker skinned black women.

The first person to bring attention to the spread was user on Twitter:

Interestingly enough, Welteroth responded to the accusations online.

“How do you define black?” she wrote. “Just curious. Is it about skin color? Eye color? Hair texture? I ask because this mixed-race model is as black as I am. Also, how do you define cultural appropriation? I ask only because I want to better understand your point of view.

Then the model in question stated that she’s actually ‘black’, even though everything but black is listed on her page.

“For the record, if anyone even cares . Yes im half black and half French.”

In any event, does anyone expect anything other than light-washing (as opposed to white-washing) from Teen Vogue?


Photo Credits: Teen Vogue/ Chloe Louvouezo/IG

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  • Allie

    and her twist look like shit. She knows better ! She co-signing this bull….ughhh I can’t I would post a pick of my dark ass with beautiful Havana twist that I did myself if I could!!!

  • Anastasia Hill-Thompson

    Also, while i’m thinking, this is why it is important for black people to have and support their OWN publications. Teen Vouge is for young, affluent white girls. While media pretty much reinforces systematic racism, and for there to be positive images of color to exist in that area I stopped waiting for my beauty and my culture to be validated in these spaces. Elaine, (who worked for Ebony and Essence) could have very well had more photos

  • disqus_tP7K2Xmh2Y

    If the model used is part “American” shouldn’t she look more like she comes from all the contenents in Africa?

  • Samah Juana

    Black women wear wigs and weaves all day and white people do not care. If you look at the texture of the model hair. It is clearly not white women hair. I think this being made into a bigger deal than what it really is.